Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'rocks'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
    Tags should be keywords or key phrases. e.g. carcharodon, pliocene, cypresshead formation, florida.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Fossil Discussion
    • General Fossil Discussion
    • Fossil Hunting Trips
    • Fossil ID
    • Is It Real? How to Recognize Fossil Fabrications
    • Partners in Paleontology - Member Contributions to Science
    • Questions & Answers
    • Fossil of the Month
    • Member Collections
    • A Trip to the Museum
    • Paleo Re-creations
    • Collecting Gear
    • Fossil Preparation
    • Member Fossil Trades Bulletin Board
    • Member-to-Member Fossil Sales
    • Fossil News
  • Gallery
  • Fossil Sites
    • Africa
    • Asia
    • Australia - New Zealand
    • Canada
    • Europe
    • Middle East
    • South America
    • United States
  • Fossil Media
    • Members Websites
    • Fossils On The Web
    • Fossil Photography
    • Fossil Literature
    • Documents

Blogs

  • Anson's Blog
  • Mudding Around
  • Nicholas' Blog
  • dinosaur50's Blog
  • Traviscounty's Blog
  • Seldom's Blog
  • tracer's tidbits
  • Sacredsin's Blog
  • fossilfacetheprospector's Blog
  • jax world
  • echinoman's Blog
  • Ammonoidea
  • Traviscounty's Blog
  • brsr0131's Blog
  • brsr0131's Blog
  • Adventures with a Paddle
  • Caveat emptor
  • -------
  • Fig Rocks' Blog
  • placoderms
  • mosasaurs
  • ozzyrules244's Blog
  • Sir Knightia's Blog
  • Terry Dactyll's Blog
  • shakinchevy2008's Blog
  • MaHa's Blog
  • Stratio's Blog
  • ROOKMANDON's Blog
  • Phoenixflood's Blog
  • Brett Breakin' Rocks' Blog
  • Seattleguy's Blog
  • jkfoam's Blog
  • Erwan's Blog
  • Erwan's Blog
  • Lindsey's Blog
  • marksfossils' Blog
  • ibanda89's Blog
  • Liberty's Blog
  • Liberty's Blog
  • Back of Beyond
  • St. Johns River Shark Teeth/Florida
  • Ameenah's Blog
  • gordon's Blog
  • West4me's Blog
  • West4me's Blog
  • Pennsylvania Perspectives
  • michigantim's Blog
  • michigantim's Blog
  • lauraharp's Blog
  • lauraharp's Blog
  • micropterus101's Blog
  • micropterus101's Blog
  • GPeach129's Blog
  • nicciann's Blog
  • Olenellus' Blog
  • nicciann's Blog
  • maybe a nest fossil?
  • Deep-Thinker's Blog
  • Deep-Thinker's Blog
  • bear-dog's Blog
  • javidal's Blog
  • Digging America
  • John Sun's Blog
  • John Sun's Blog
  • Ravsiden's Blog
  • Jurassic park
  • The Hunt for Fossils
  • The Fury's Grand Blog
  • julie's ??
  • Hunt'n 'odonts!
  • falcondob's Blog
  • Monkeyfuss' Blog
  • cyndy's Blog
  • pattyf's Blog
  • pattyf's Blog
  • chrisf's Blog
  • chrisf's Blog
  • nola's Blog
  • mercyrcfans88's Blog
  • Emily's PRI Adventure
  • trilobite guy's Blog
  • xenacanthus' Blog
  • barnes' Blog
  • myfossiltrips.blogspot.com
  • HeritageFossils' Blog
  • Fossilefinder's Blog
  • Fossilefinder's Blog
  • Emily's MotE Adventure
  • farfarawy's Blog
  • Microfossil Mania!
  • A Novice Geologist
  • Southern Comfort
  • Eli's Blog
  • andreas' Blog
  • Recent Collecting Trips
  • retired blog
  • Stocksdale's Blog
  • andreas' Blog test
  • fossilman7's Blog
  • Books I have enjoyed
  • Piranha Blog
  • xonenine's blog
  • xonenine's Blog
  • Fossil collecting and SAFETY
  • Detrius
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • Jocky's Blog
  • Jocky's Blog
  • Kehbe's Kwips
  • RomanK's Blog
  • Prehistoric Planet Trilogy
  • mikeymig's Blog
  • Western NY Explorer's Blog
  • Regg Cato's Blog
  • VisionXray23's Blog
  • Carcharodontosaurus' Blog
  • What is the largest dragonfly fossil? What are the top contenders?
  • Hihimanu Hale
  • Test Blog
  • jsnrice's blog
  • Lise MacFadden's Poetry Blog
  • BluffCountryFossils Adventure Blog
  • meadow's Blog
  • Makeing The Unlikley Happen
  • KansasFossilHunter's Blog
  • DarrenElliot's Blog
  • jesus' Blog
  • A Mesozoic Mosaic
  • Dinosaur comic
  • Zookeeperfossils
  • Cameronballislife31's Blog
  • My Blog
  • TomKoss' Blog
  • A guide to calcanea and astragali
  • Group Blog Test
  • Paleo Rantings of a Blockhead
  • Dead Dino is Art
  • The Amber Blog
  • TyrannosaurusRex's Facts
  • PaleoWilliam's Blog
  • The Paleo-Tourist
  • The Community Post
  • Lyndon D Agate Johnson's Blog
  • BRobinson7's Blog
  • Eastern NC Trip Reports
  • Toofuntahh's Blog
  • Pterodactyl's Blog
  • A Beginner's Foray into Fossiling
  • Micropaleontology blog
  • Pondering on Dinosaurs
  • Fossil Preparation Blog
  • On Dinosaurs and Media
  • cheney416's fossil story
  • jpc
  • Red-Headed Red-Neck Rock-Hound w/ My Trusty HellHound Cerberus
  • Red Headed
  • Paleo-Profiles
  • Walt's Blog
  • Between A Rock And A Hard Place
  • Rudist digging at "Point 25", St. Bartholomä, Styria, Austria (Campanian, Gosau-group)
  • Prognathodon saturator 101

Calendars

  • Calendar

Categories

  • Annelids
  • Arthropods
    • Crustaceans
    • Insects
    • Trilobites
    • Other Arthropods
  • Brachiopods
  • Cnidarians (Corals, Jellyfish, Conulariids )
    • Corals
    • Jellyfish, Conulariids, etc.
  • Echinoderms
    • Crinoids & Blastoids
    • Echinoids
    • Other Echinoderms
    • Starfish and Brittlestars
  • Forams
  • Graptolites
  • Molluscs
    • Bivalves
    • Cephalopods (Ammonites, Belemnites, Nautiloids)
    • Gastropods
    • Other Molluscs
  • Sponges
  • Bryozoans
  • Other Invertebrates
  • Ichnofossils
  • Plants
  • Chordata
    • Amphibians & Reptiles
    • Birds
    • Dinosaurs
    • Fishes
    • Mammals
    • Sharks & Rays
    • Other Chordates
  • *Pseudofossils ( Inorganic objects , markings, or impressions that resemble fossils.)

Found 82 results

  1. This is a completely new area of interest for me, but I find scanning for microfossils addictive. I got some vinegar and plan on processing some beach rocks (East Central Florida) that I picked up because I could see easily see some small fossils on the surface and assumed there would also be micro fossils inside. I crushed a few small samples, which did reveal more microfossils. Mostly what I could identify are broken bits of bones, but I'm sure there is much more that I'm missing. There is one object I found very interesting and beautiful, however I don't know what it is. I would like to know what you think the first object might be. That object is still attached to the matrix. The other object I found in the same sample. Both were revealed after breaking the sample. The first item is about 1/8th inch long but very narrow, and from some angles appears to be a hollow tube. The next object appears to be bone and is only about 2.5 mm wide and long. Thanks.
  2. Hey everyone. I thought I'd share some of the things I found on my last fossil hunt. So.. Many.. Fossils! One might even say that there were a plethora of fossils. If I could, I would've taken them all with me, but sadly my backpack can only carry so many rocks. I was literally examining each rock I had, trying to decide which to carry back and which to leave behind and how many I could fit in my pants pockets before they started to fall down. Eventually I decided to just stop looking for fossils and hike back to the jeep. This lasted all of 3 seconds before I found another a beautiful byrozoan and was trying to figure out how to fit it in my pack. The byrozoan and the sponge below are my favorites since i don't see many of them and the brachipod in the matrix just looks cool. lol Its fascinating to look at these fossils and think about how Arizona used to be completely underwater long, long ago.
  3. A very simple website (mostly pdf-documents) about my fossil hunting trips and some other stuff: Die Steirische Geo-Seite All in German... Franz Bernhard
  4. Yesterday (Saturday, Aug. 22nd), I went fossil hunting in Ellsworth County, Kansas again for elusive Dakota Sandstone leaves and unfortunately it's mostly a bust, just like the previous trip. Despite that, I enjoyed the scenery and found some odd rocks and few fossils from new sites. A new site produced a few small plates containing woody and plant material fragments. I decided not to keep them. Closer views... Remember that interesting sandstone from the previous trip? I regretted for not taking it home so I took another opportunity and revisited the old site to get that rock! The back of this rock is quite smooth and flat, I think it would be great to have it hang up on the wall, but I'm actually not sure how I will display it. Looking at it is like reading a 3D map! It's the only object I brought home from this trip. It's peaceful out there and the views of the Smoky Hills never gets old. ...continued on the next post.
  5. Is this real or man made

    Is this real or man made? Unsure what it is
  6. Sharks Teeth or Rocks?

    Hi Everyone! I'm new here but was hoping for some help. My daughter and I were hunting for sea glass yesterday along the coastline in Jamestown, RI (there is a small, hidden location that has worn down glass, pottery, shells and stones) and I found a few treasures that look like they could be shark teeth but I'm not convinced. In your opinion are these worn down fossils or simply rocks that got my hopes up??? Any input would be greatly appreciated!
  7. Me and my fiance headed into Wauchula this afternoon to try to find some good gravel spots at the behest of @Shellseeker and his helpful advice given to me on my last post. I have been to the Peace a total of 4 times, all within the span of a month or two because these water conditions are just way too good to pass up. Every time I come back to the river I have a new game plan and every time I actually get TO the river the plan goes out the window. Today's adventure was no different. We pulled up to Wauchula Riverside Park (Crews Park?) and were pleasantly surprised with the condition of the park. I had read about some sketchy things happening in that area and while we were unloading our gear a police cruiser circled the lot twice, it made me feel safe about leaving my vehicle. The park seemed newly renovated so I was assuming these past cases of break ins and theft occurred before then. We walked over to the boat ramp and prepared to search for a gravel bed north of the park; that is until we came across a friendly kayaker and her son. She noted that down the river a little was an island that her fossil hunting friends liked to dig at but had to swim to get to it in higher water season since they didn't use kayaks. We were not prepared to swim but the thought of a glorious "fossil island" that my fiance can set her chair up on and watch me sift gravel for 8 hours was just too enticing and we abandoned our upriver plans and decided to head down towards the bends. We found a small sandy trail to take us as far as we could on dry land before we had to make any attempts into the river, there were many downed trees and root systems that would make walking the dry area pretty difficult. This trail lead us into some of the highest and thickest grass I have walked in. I felt like I was going to be attacked by a pokemon... or a snake... but we were lucky and did not have any issues. I think this is a trail in the Peace River Park. Anyhow, we found a nice spot to cross the deep part of the river and found ourselves on the opposite side of the bank, it only came up to our thighs but there was zero visibility in the water. Then suddenly, a dad and his kids make an appearance with their fishing poles... After a quick chat we learned he was heading to a similar spot around the bend to fish a hole... You should have seen the look my fiance gave me. How in the world would we be able to dig for fossils in the same area that this guy is fishing in deep holes?! WHERE IS FOSSIL ISLAND? My hopes were dashed, my fiance wanted to go back to gardner, and there was a huge downed tree in the middle of the river with no gravel in sight. TFF what would you have done?! I continued on. Luckily it paid off. We hopped up on the legal side of the bank and walked 20 feet further to the end of the first bend. It was there! Sticking out of the middle of the river like a huge zit ready to burst with meg teeth WE FOUND FOSSIL ISLAND! We hopped back into the river and crossed the deepest part to get to fossil island, it was about knee deep and the entire bottom sounded crunchy which my trusty fence post confirmed to be a pretty significant gravel layer. Fossil island was pocketed with holes from other diggers but I was more interested in the deepest part off the side of fossil island. I figured when the water level is up this deepest spot will get un-diggably high but since it is so low right now I can get 2 to 3 feet into the gravel before the water started getting too deep for my shovel. At this point the JoshRockz excavation project was in full swing. I was digging in this layer and in the first couple sifts we were already finding larger than our usual size teeth. We got about a foot down before my fiance decided to go surface collect and I was getting alot of clams in my shovel loads but not alot of teeth, I widened out my hole and noticed I was pulling out chunks of matrix as shown in IMG 6228. I will be displaying this piece, I have not encountered the hard rock matrix; I have only really encountered the thick clay in the deep areas of Gardner and I imagine this is how it weathers out of the walls of the peace. Around these pieces of matrix I started to pull up many megaladon frags and hemis along with smaller teeth of other variety and quality. These are the largest teeth we have found thus far and I am so happy with our first dig in this location! The only downside was that this area in general has alot of broken glass that fortunately did not harm me but definitely made me reconsider not wearing gloves in the river. I also pulled up about 15-20 iron nails that were at times in a pretty dangerous condition and large. Tetanus city. This was 2-3 feet down into the gravel I was pulling these nails out so I am a little intrigued as to where they came from. All in all I will be returning to Wauchula in the future and I cant thank Jack enough for his advice. Oh, Turns out the largest hemi (also) the largest intact tooth that we found (second left in 6226) was surface collected right on the top of fossil island by my fiance. Strange are the ways of the peace river... ps I am going to get a kayak because all of this could have been avoided and we could have been there in 5 minutes if we had one.
  8. I collected some weird fossil rocks today from Lake Michigan in Wisconsin, what are they?
  9. portion of my collection

    a small part of my collection. I am into rocks, fossils, shark teeth, shells and more! Love hunting for such!! Deb
  10. Fossils or not

    washed up on Isle of Palms beach outside Charleston SC Upper left one has me dumbfounded. Would love to know if they are bones, what animal are they from
  11. Greetings kind people, I'm so sorry if this is such a noob question. But I've searched and searched but I couldn't find answers to these on internet. (kindly correct me because I feel I maybe wrong): Smithsonian website said licking dinosaur fossil helps in identifying between a rock or a fossil... But isn't fossil a rock in itself? Fossils are made because minerals get replaced and it's not possible for bone to remain in its original state for millions of years. So, it's not the original material anymore.. so licking a fossil should equal to licking a rock? In that case, licking should not work?
  12. River Drava fossil ID

    Hello fellow FF enthusiasts! So first of all, please bear with me, I basically just got into fossil hunting and my eye is not as keen yet, but I managed to have a nice hour / two outside and found a couple of different small finds, things buried deep within bigger sedimentary rocks, located just next to the river (some inside). I'm going to give some short info regarding where they were found and the geological age of the region I'm searching in. Location: River rocky beach (river Drava / Drave, southern EU). Geological era: Neogene / Neogene (-Quaternary) I will post some pictures, which are accompanied by a ruler in EU measurment (centimeters - cm). Like I said I'm no expert, but I will try to give some opinion on the pictures. If you are familiar with anything found here let me know, I'll be happy of just about any new knowledge and information that will be obtained Pic. #1: The way I see it, it looks like a 'Brachiopod' shell, but I'm not sure if it actually fits into the time zone. I would more likely say it is a 'Barnacle or a Theostraca' found in Pleistocene. Pic. #2: (three pictures of it total): I found this 'rock' already submerged in the water and by the looks of it it just might be a regular rock, but it's shape caught my attenion since it is very smooth underneath and seperated by, what it looks like, a channel of some sort? It's length is approximately 3 cm (1.1811 inch) long. Again, any info on this would be great! Pic. #3: No idea on this one. Maybe a part of a gastropod, like an inprint of the shell itself? Lenght 8mm (0.314961 inch). Pic. #4: Preety sure it is a gastropod of a sort, looks like the whole shell is solidly preserved. Underneath is also a small part, most likely a part of the upper and bigger shell. I would say it looks like a 'Neptunea contraria', but I can't say if it is actually from the Neogene period or something more recent? I would also like to ask for any tips how to remove it or at least not brake it when attempting to make the entire rock smaller. Also is it necessary to apply any substances to such things or will it survive like this, stored somwhere dry? That would be that. Like I said, it's not much but I was very happy to find anything at all. Thank you in advance for any answers and the time you will take to read the post!
  13. I was hiking with the wife looking for an old abandoned Train tunnel built in 1899. [found it.] I saw some rocks that caught my eye and picked them up. One looks like Ar Quartz and one looks like it could be crinoid's but not sure. Any help appreciated.
  14. Fossil riverbed finds ?

    My fiance' and I went fossil hunting by the river and collected some things . Does this look like a piece of a horse tooth? Can't figure out what the second picture could be though.
  15. Does anyone know where i can get a decent affordable air scribe for prepping? Something under $100 . Some of the ones ive seen are over that. Thanks
  16. Ahhhh, this curiosity of mine... I am so glad that the folks on this forum love to teach and help a novice like me! The closer and closer I look at a rock, the more fascinated I am by it. I found what looked like a "plain old rock" today. (IS there such a thing?!) I cleaned it and started looking at it under a magnifying glass. There was a little hole in the rock, so I decided to try to see what was IN the hole. As I examined it, I realized that it was a bit like looking into a cave in a hillside. How fun! Of course that just brought on more questions, though. I photographed one particular area from different perspectives and looked at it even closer. I am not seeing the fan like bryozoan fossils I have seen in my other fossiliferous (I love that word) limestone - unless I am looking at it from a completely different angle (a possibility!!). From one perspective (the one I am posting here), there are two pieces that seem like they might have originally been connected - kind of like a shell of some sort that has a part removed from it? Like the curve might be broken? But the closer I looked, the more tubule like parts I thought I saw. So, here I am once again... Begging your patience and asking to glean from your vast experiences. This part of the rock is very small - I will add another photo of it with a ruler to show scale. I can include photos of the entire rock but I am trying to study this one tiny spot on it for now? Thanks so much for your help! Edited to add: Found in Huntsville, Alabama. I also THINK I see some crinoid fossils elsewhere on this particular rock, if that helps with classification. From what I can tell so far, we are in the Mississipian age? Ramona
  17. Lauderdale/ Limestone County line

    I’m VERY new to this but have had some luck( I think). I had them all separated but with the storms came a strong enough wind that a piece of a tree that my husband uses in his hand built smoke knocked the leg off my table and boom there they went and then had to chase my protectors to get some back. Anyway, does it make since that all the different items would be found in a very small section of my yard. The dog house is farther away. It may take a minute to up load the pics. Of course if you want to help ID any I would give you a Dixie land, “Bless You, child, Bless You!”
  18. Rocks galore

    hopefully these little videos will work because I have a hard time with the pictures this may be easier for y’all to understand my question? 59223650294__99B2EC9F-02CA-48F9-B59F-077E7F7938F3.MOV
  19. From my Maine back yard

    While clearing rocks out of my garden I found two - this is one. I took these pictures with my phone - I have others taken with a high-end camera, but as I see things in these pictures I don't see in those, I'm going with these to start. They're from Moosebec Reach I think, between Jonesport and Beals Island. Since there were two together, I imagine someone found them and eventually dumped them "out back". That is all I know ... anyone???????
  20. until
    Baltimore gem cutting club's annual show. They have displays of gem work, rock, mineral, and fossil collections various vendors selling rock, mineral, and fossils. They have a scavenger hunt for the kids to learn about various rocks, minerals, and fossils as well as an area for them to gem hunt. Gem cutters guild website
  21. until
    Baltimore gem cutting club's annual show. They have displays of gem work, rock, mineral, and fossil collections various vendors selling rock, mineral, and fossils. They have a scavenger hunt for the kids to learn about various rocks, minerals, and fossils as well as an area for them to gem hunt. Gem cutters guild website
  22. Does anyone know what this could be?

    Does anyone know what this could be? Whether that’s a fossil or a rock lol I’ve tried to research around it but I haven’t gotten anything just yet
  23. Whiskey Bridge first time

    I decided to check out Whiskey bridge in college station. Awesome place, it’s beautiful. U can see where people have been chipping away looking for fossils. Cracked open one of these geode balls and found pyrite inside and found this large round ball that looks like a clam, gonna clean it to see what it is
  24. Fossil?

    My daughter is currently interested in fossils after finding the small collection I put together as a child. Whenever we get for a walk by our local river I end up with as many of these as she can make me carry. Are they actually fossils, and if so, what are they? Thanks in advance
×