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Found 109 results

  1. Bone or Sandstone with shell bits

    Found in clay soil, Cerritos, California.
  2. Removing hard matrix

    I dug this up in Wyoming and was told it's a Mioplosus. The soft sandstone came off with only a bit of effort. Now I'm on to a harder crystalized matrix around the most delicate areas. I don't want to lose any of the carbon so I'm asking for help. I've used dental tools and pen razors so far. I see amazing, beautifully completed fossils on this site with no sandstone on them at all. Is there a method or tool I am unaware of?
  3. Hello everyone! Just got home from my weekly vacation and started immediately the preparation. The matrix is soft, mostly loose sandstone and once wet you can process it easier. Right now I have no power tools, only some screw drives and picks. The process seems that will take a lot of time. Any advice is welcome. I also need advice concerning some issues. 1. One urchin that after making it wet, a crack was revealed. There is possibility that the crack expanded by half millimeter. How I treat that? Naturally dry it and application of 20% paraloid? Then proceed as above? 2. Another sample has a small piece broken, which of course I collected. The broken piece has some matrix on it and is less than 2cm. Again paraloid and then same process? 3. The drying process can be accelerated with sunlight or this might be dangerous and may cause cracks? Thanks everyone. The first pic is the one I am working now. It was like a sandball before removing most of the matrix and now I am doing detailing. The second is the slightly cracked at 11 o'clock. The white side was exposed in the weather, the rest was within sandstone wall in the quarry.
  4. Many roots of the Lepidodendron have been found here cast in fine grained, very hard sandstone. One specimen of bark has been found that is in a repetitive diamond pattern reminiscent of scales on a tropical palm type tree. Another one off specimen is of the interior trunk or wood of the tree--(presumably). All of these specimens are the same type of sandstone. This is definitely Lepidodendron country as no other fossils have been found here to date. Pics of individual specimens will be gladly posted upon request.
  5. Hi there! I am brand new to the forum, but have been a fossil lover all my life. I am hoping to learn the best way to preserve sandstone leaf fossils. I've been finding them since I was a kid and my mother use to coat they in polyurethane, I believe. I'm just not convinced this is the best practice. I imagine the chemicals would deteriorate the stone overtime? Anyways, I would appreciate any and all advice. Thanks in advance! Dea
  6. Harding sandstone question

    Hi guys, I recently purchased some processed Harding sandstone, I was looking for unprocessed stuff but I could not find any for sale so I had to just go with this. The fossils arrived today and I have been examining them with my microscope, I find this stuff very fascinating. My question is regarding these fossils here: the ID guide that came with them claims they are sharks but I find this strange, I believe chondrichthyes only appeared in the Late Silurian so how could this be? Are they something else, and if so do we know what that something would be? Also if they are sharks would we not also expect to find their teeth, yet they seem absent in this matrix. Thank you, Misha
  7. Help with ID for these please

    I keep finding small rocks at the base of banks alongside the road, around the area where I live in Bath, UK. Most of them contain bivalves but I keep coming across this shape which I can’t recognise (picture 1) Picture 2 is a close-up of rock A which seems least weathered. I think these are the imprints left behind by something but I also have an example of what I think could be the actual object itself (please excuse my lack of terminology!) but it’s tiny compared to the other three examples (picture 3) Any help with this would be great thanks.
  8. Small Animals

    Last week I visited a silurian site and found this stone. I wonder which kind of animals this is? And which kind of stone, which is blue inside with a relative thin layer of white material on the surface. The animals are "printed" on the surface. Martin
  9. Hello there fossil forum! A few of you may have read my post about my 2 trips to Bornholm, a Danish island that holds a lot of different fossiliferous geological layers. I had specifically been digging by a location called "Hasle beach", where mid-jurassic sandstone layers are present. There have been found a few plesiosaur bones/teeth there, as well as 2 possible dinosaur bones, still being described, and also a few footprints. Other than that, mostly what you will find here, is shells, and occasionally hybodont shark teeth. As I mentioned in my last post about Bornholm (you can read it here), I found a ratfish/chimaera tooth together with the drummer from my heavy metal band. Our guitarist and bassist were nearby, as me and the drummer sat in one spot, opening several large eroded sandstones together, when suddenly a small black lump was visible within the orange sandstone. It turned out to be a chimaera tooth. When we were done digging for the 7 days we were there, we handed some of the stuff over to the museum on the island to check it out. I took the chimaera tooth with me home. About 1 and a half month later, a renowned Danish paleontologist made a lecture/presentation about dinosaur finds on Greenland. In between one of the breaks in his presentation, I got to talk to him, and I had taken some of my finds from Bornholm with me, including some plesiosaur bones, and the chimaera tooth. He took some of the stuff with him, to examine closer. He sent some of the bones back last month, saying it was some partial vertebrae fragments, which wouldn't be of interest to the geological institute. However, the chimaera tooth was interesting, as it was unlike other chimaera teeth found at the location. Today I just got an email from the paleontologist, that the tooth is in fact from a new species, and will be included in a scientific article about chimaera-fauna in the Hasle-formation! It has officially been declared "Danekræ", which is a title all "scientifically important" fossil-finds are given. It becomes state-property, and the finder/finders of the fossil are rewarded with some cash, as well as the honors of having their name attached to the find!
  10. Funny stuff imbedded in rock

    Found this rock in Wisconsin US near Lake Michigan. Looked interesting but I have no good idea of what they are. The largest length of the black things is 12.7 mm or1/2 in. all encased in the light shaded rock band.
  11. My big old fish

    The fossil forum members identified this fish years ago but I lost that information due to a computer crash. I can remember they thought it came from Brazil? and had an age attached to it. I found it at an estate sale in Racine WI. in the basement of the house. The owner said it had been in that corner when he purchased the house and was more than happy for me to take it out of his way. I think it is very interesting but would like more information. Thank you
  12. Found this in a creek bed. Looks like sandstone. Not sure what it could be. Any help would be appreciated. In Western NY. Chautauqua county.
  13. Trace fossils? Coral? Anemone? Worms?!?

    Hey there! This is my first post on The Fossil Forum. I don't have a lot of knowledge about fossils, but I sure do know how to find them. Hopefully these aren't too obvious and boring, but I'm incredibly curious anyway. I found these near Sheep Bridge north of Phoenix, Arizona. Here the Verde river has cut through deep layers of ancient lava, sandstone, mudstone, etc. I was exploring for crystals up on a steep hill along the river's canyon walls when I came across a whole lot of these things. They are very fragile and I didn't want to break apart some of the 2-3 foot wide boulders of them so as to preserve them for others to find. Anyway, my understanding is that this area was once a sea floor, so I'm assuming they are some type of coral, anemone or something similar. The fossils are composed mostly of the same sediment which encases them, so I suppose they must be trace fossils, but please correct me if I am wrong. Other not-so-filled-in ones even had crystals and other minerals lining the cavity. As well, I looked at a geological map of Arizona and the area I was exploring is composed of the following... Late to Middle Miocene Basaltic Rocks (8-16 Ma): Mostly dark, mesa-forming basalt deposited as lava flows. Pliocene to Middle Miocene Deposits (2-16 Ma): Moderately to strongly consolidated conglomerate and sandstone deposited in basins during and after late Tertiary faulting. Includes lesser amounts of mudstone, siltstone, limestone, and gypsum. There are a couple photos of some ball shaped objects which were very easy to knock apart from the surrounding stone. I have no idea what those could be. The rest of the photos are of the coral looking objects. Some of them, if still intact, were nearly 24 inches long, but I left those behind and only took smaller samples. Please note how the "head" of the corals appears to flare out and is larger than the rest of the stem. Finally, some of them appear to have a little node sticking out of the "head," but I suspect that may be due to weathering as these are very fragile fossils. Thank you all so much for your interest and help and I look forward to learning more!
  14. Need help with Barnacle!

    Hello, can anyone please help me with this Barnacle. Is this old? Do you have any idea of the age of this or if a fossil even or just a dead barnacle shell. Its about 2 inches the shell its self and about 1 1/2 depth. It was found in Oregon, United States (Pacific Ocean Beach)
  15. ID help please

    Hi! I found this piece of sandstone in South Wales last week. Are they ammonites?
  16. Tree Fossil?

    Found this piece of sandstone in Sullivan Co., PA. It comes from either the Huntley Mtn. Fm. (Mississippian/Devonian) or the Burgoon Ss. (Mississippian). What could have made these concentric rings? They go through the rock perpendicular to bedding. It's odd that the center is mostly round but further out is more square. Could it be a tree fossil? That is the only thing I can think of.
  17. Stabilising Dinosaur Footprint

    Hello everyone, I have a question regarding stabilising sandstone to keep it from crumbling. Last year I found and extracted a dinosaur footprint from a block on the beach at Whitby, Yorkshire UK. The footprint is of an Aalenian age therapod from approximately 170 million years ago. The print itself measures 20cm from the base to the tip of the centre claw mark. I am hoping to get the block it is in cut down into a slab in order to frame it but now that it is dry the sandstone is very loose and crumbly. I am looking for something that will add strength to the stone and prevent crumbling without significantly changing the colour of the stone or adding a shiny finish as I would like the finished piece to remain as close as possible to how it was, just stronger. I was hoping somebody would have an idea what would be best to soak the block with in order to keep it from falling apart. Any and all suggestions are greatly appreciated. Thank you, Benton Walters
  18. Hello All! I am new here, recommended to visit this site, for help Identifying what I found, by someone named The Fossil Guy, who I found on Facebook by following the site Fossilera. My name is Hollie and I am from Long Island, New York. The object in question that I need help identifying was found by myself about ten years ago on the north shore of Long Island in a town called Lloyd Harbor and on the beach. Long Island was formed by a glacier 13,000 ago and is a terminal moraine. The north shore beaches are very rocky with large glacial rocks everywhere and the south shore beaches are all sand. I was told by the fossil guy that my piece is an imprint of a mollusk or worm in sandstone. I am hopeful you all can give me an idea to what it may be. Thank you and happy holidays!!
  19. Sandstone fossil

    Found in Tuscarawas county, Ohio, USA. I found along a shallow stream bed that cuts deeply through a rocky gorge. Nearby is a large fossilized tree branch and I have found other Fossil there as well. The material is sandstone and I noticed it's starting to deteriorate. The size of the overall specimen is 152 mm in length.
  20. fossil found

    I found this fossil on my property at top of Laurelas Grade in Hidden Hills off Carmel Valley Rd. state of Calif. It appears to be some kind of fish. Can anyone give any more information on what this could be? Entire size of rock is approx 6" wide. I have found lots of mollusk type fossils but never a fish. thanks kathleen
  21. Shell?

    Found this interesting shell today. Seems to be sandstone. Thought it was a walnut shell at first. Can anyone ID?
  22. I found a few of these fossils the other day and cant figure out what it is. Let me know your thoughts. The triangle is flat and you can see corners poking out when looked at from different angles.
  23. Please tell me those are fish!!! (One of my dream find fossils)Found this near downtown Lockhart believe it or not, I’m a little protective over the spot cuz I COULD get super specific on this one and it’s not very off the beaten path ...lol
  24. Just wanted to share the newest addition to my collection. An anchisauripus dinosaur track fossil, collected legally in Massachusetts.
  25. Insect Plant Fish or ...?

    Greetings, everyone. I spent the other day on the east side of Ventura County breaking open sedimentary rocks. I'm not experienced enough with that sort of material to positively ID it but I think it was siltstone. There was a leaf and something else on both sides of one of the rocks. I've been having a hard time figuring out what the "something else" is. It measures about 35 by 14 millimeters. I took a few pictures of both sides under different lighting conditions to help bring out some of the finer details. It comes from the Modelo Formation (Miocene). Thanks ahead of time for any help in figuring out what it is. Here are pictures of the first side: Some pictures of the second side:
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