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Found 27 results

  1. Awesome poo

    I just got an awesome coprolite. I generally hate those things, and would never pay money for one, but I came across this one and it has so many visible identifiable remains, I couldn't help being really impressed. Ive always wanted to see a coprolite that had clear remains in it. Sadly they're much smaller and harder to see in person than in these pictures, so I can only use these display pictures for the time being, until I take a magnified look. There's clearly fish scales, seemingly from different types of fish, and apparently squid hooks and such. I'm excited to find a good illuminated magnifying glass and really studying it up close:) Maybe even a microscope to take a closer look!
  2. Devonian fish scales

    With not a lot of new material to obsess with (broken arm) I have been going through old specimens to see if there are unfinished prepping and ID needed. Here is a set of scales/scale impressions collected in 2014 at Red Hill, late devonian (Famennian) site in Pennsylvania. Found in the shallow channel margin (red sediments) with what has been ID'd as a couple scapulocoracoids of the acanthodian, Gyracanthus (plus a fin spine). They are almost certainly sarcopterygian but not sure what clade. Has anyone, Archie? seen similar scales. Thought they might be Holoptychius but they don't look like the classic Holoptychius scales and they were not at all common in this upriver environment. Doug Rowe who oversees the site and runs the outstanding museum there, suggested they might be Rhizodont but nothing I've seen of Rhizodont scales looks anything like these. Thanks for any help.
  3. Fossil or other

    Found in South Texas scrub brush, no idea but looks like scales or skin? Any help would be appreciated, Thanks.
  4. T. Rex integument?

    I am in the process of creating scientifically accurate extinct plush animals, and I had a question in regards to the integument of Tyrannosaurus Rex. I know there is evidence supporting the scaly covering of T. Rex from various impressions from the Wyrex specimen, but I am unsure of the location, size and implication of these impressions. We want to make our animals (while made more 'cute') to be accurate to the scientific finds at the time of their production. However, I must admit a large attraction of the T. Rex plush is that it will have a feathery covering on it's body. Even though the feathers are highly speculative I think the idea of feathers on a T. Rex will get some people to question what they know and hopefully delve more into the science behind these creatures rather than just take recreations at face value. So my question in short is this: Where do we KNOW T. Rex had scales, how large were these scales, and whats the maximum size and location of coverage we could accurately speculate T. Rex could have had feathers without ignoring the facts? Thanks a ton for your answers and views
  5. Dark Colored Fish

    I have a few fish fossils here that are in a dark colored matrix. I do not know what species they are, nor how old. You can see scales preserved on them, which I think is pretty interesting. Any information about them would be very appreciated! Thank You!!
  6. Mazon Creek fish scales

    I am asking for help identifying the species of some fish scales from Mazon creek. The scales were too small to put a scale in, but the whole patch is about 1.2mm in width. On the reverse side of the concretion it appears there are some spines under the scales, possibly from the fin. My initial thinking is Rhabdoderma Exiguum as the fin looks similar to me as an example from RCFossil's collection:
  7. I found this fossil around 4 years ago in a creek in West Virginia. I'm curious to know if it is possible to determine the time period when this fossil might have formed, the possible creature it might have been, and just more about it in general. The fossil is composed of a very deeply embedded scale pattern that is about 2.5 inches in diameter. Only about 1/2 of the fossil is very visible, and the fossil is in a layered black rock. The fossil appears as though it is long, like a snake would have been, but unfortunately I only have a small portion of the original fossil, so it's hard to tell. Any help would be greatly appreciated!
  8. My daugther found this fossil

    My daughter found this fossil today, and it looks like scales but we aren't exactly sure what it is. Any ideas? Thanks!
  9. Hell Creek - Scales, Scutes, Skin?

    So I'm working my way through my tiny fossils, collected in the Hell Creek Formation in Montana. These are gar scales, right? They are quite blue! Is there a species name, or just "gar"? And this next set I'm not too sure of. Some sort of skin/scale/scutes? The third is quite more spiky, and the fourth is much more smooth than the other two. The 2nd and 3rd here I think are scutes? From crocodile? And what's in the first container? And finally, some misc. items. The 1st I think is a turtle rib (shown from inside the shell?) And the 2nd is an edge of a turtle shell (smooth on both sides, curves down to the nice edge on top). The 3rd has slight ridges on it. And the 4th looks like a random bone fragment....but it broke in a nice zig-zag pattern (at the top) - or is it actually something?
  10. Found in mineral springs by the Mississippi
  11. Shell ridges or animal scales ?

    Hi folks, another discovery in my garden. I haven't seen this size or type of segmented surface before. It doesn't really look like a shell as it has a wavy contour that I hope you can see in the pics. Thanks,
  12. Suspicious looking beach rock...

    Hi all, I like to collect rocks off the beach and while I'm usually skeptical of anything that looks like it has organic patterns, this one has just totally stumped me and my curiosity is killing me! It looks like it might have belonged to something living but I really don't know. Found in Albert Beach, Lake Winnipeg, Manitoba, washed up in the sand among a bunch of other similar sized rocks. The tooth-like structure is about half an inch tall, and the rock itself is a little over half an inch long. The tooth-like structure has these vertical stripes all around while there are scale-like patterns on the bulbous end. Can't tell if plant or animal (if organic at all). Please help! I'm dying to know. Will happily take more photos on request. Thank you!
  13. Fossil Fish ID

    Hi Everyone, About 20yrs ago, I was given an unprepared fossils from a friend of the family (from Oxford in the UK). Admittedly it's taken me 20yrs to get round to preparing it, but now that I have, it seems pretty interesting. I did a basic preparation on this tonight and the fossil fish has come up really nicely. I've no idea when or where it was found as it was simply given to me to practice on. Any guidance from a few fish experts would be brilliant. The matrix was a very hard material (I think a limestone). The total length of the fish is 6 inches. Any thoughts?
  14. I need some help identifying what I think "might" be a mosasaur bone. Also, the skinny, orange items are a mystery as well. I defer to y'alls expertise!
  15. Are these scale imprints?

    Hi all, I would like to know if these are scale imprints. Initially I thought they are scales, but after examination under a macro lens, some of the lines lead from the central vertebrate to the dorsal edge, resembling neural spines and are therefore not scales. The specimen is a Knightia, about 3 inches in length. Thanks for any information.
  16. Possible coelacanth scales

    Dear Guys, I have found many strange scales with radial incisions but I do not know which kind of fish they belong to. The age of the continental limestone boulders with these scales should be Triassic. Might they belong to coelacanths? Any idea what is this? Kind regards Domas
  17. Lepidodendron sp.

    From the album Plant Fossils

    Lepidodendron sp. Location: Villablino, Spain Age: Carboniferous

    © @copy Olof Moleman

  18. Hi All, I have found these at different times in N. Texas, in upper cretaceous, Eagle Ford, with marine; ammonites, crabs etc. These, I have no idea, except that they sort of look like scales. All have very pearly look and smooth feel, with translucence to them. One photo shows the back side of the 3, with one having stone on the back side, mounted to same materia as most of the fossil finds around them. For some reason they do not look or feel as old though, however the one with stone on the back has me wondering. The close up (2nd photo) shows tiny pits on the surface, and all of the three have one larger pit in the middle and many surrounding on the surface. This makes me think of marine as well, not sure why. Please look at the photos and let me know if you have any thoughts or can steer me to the right direction. As always, everyone here ROCKS (pun intended...?), and thank you in advance for looking. -S.
  19. From my multiple trips to Trent River on Vancouver Island, I've come across a few of these and am never sure what they are, so I bring them home to one day find out. This would be Cretaceous and part of the Nanaimo group and are often found in concretions in the shale walls, or loose on the ground. This one in particular was pulled out of the shale wall and cracked open, splitting the specimen in two pieces. I look at it and see a sort of scale like pattern with little round indents on the negative part of the specimen. I really have no clue what this could be, so any help is appreciated! the photos: keep in mind the actual fossil is about 2 cm
  20. I am trying to identify the some bony fish inclusions in coprolites from the Eagle Ford Formation in Texas. Can anyone out there identify fish by vertebrae and scales? I have not been able to find any teeth in them that would help with ID. The first two pictures are from a coil-shaped coprolite that has numerous bony inclusions. I'm assuming the vertebrae (40x) and bony thing that looks like coral (20x) are from the same fish. I forgot to take measurements of this one, but the photos were taken through a microscope. The fancy scale is in a different coprolite and measures about 4 mm x 1.5 mm. The vertebrae in the last picture measures approx. 1.25 mm x 0.75 mm. Thanks for your help!
  21. How Do You Measure Up?

    There is nothing like a good scale in a photo, and they can also be a problem. Sometimes they'll blow out a photo with reflections, or cause unwanted focus issues. I've seen a lot of different types of rulers and scales on the Forum, many of them are great. Easy to read, easy on the eyes, easy on the camera. Brushed metal seems to work well, also wooden rulers. Measuring fossils and making scales with Photo Editing Software is also a very nice clean way to go...and of course there are coins. Here are a couple I have used, as well as a "Photo Scale Cube". The GSA and Society for Sedimentary Geology are both great to use, the GSA is a lot less reflective... so, let's see some of your favorite scales and rulers
  22. No, Really, It Looks Like Dermal Layers....

    Okay, How bout this one? Found in the same area near Yuma, CO. same place as "The Egg Maybe" ... and the the tooth that is not a Bison tooth... but, maybe a Gomphotheriidae.. I think it looks like scale (ish) things on (we'll call it the top) and then Dermal layers on the side (YES, I polished part of this one too... okay... well, most of it... sorry) So, here it is.... and it measures 1 1/2" x 3/4" x 1/2" Now, be kind please.... I see cells, and cell walls... don't I, it could happen right? ...more pics on the way. ... and thanks for reading...
  23. Shark Scales/skin?

    I am having trouble nailing down what exactly this fossil is and would appreciate some help. It is from the Phosphoria formation (270 ma), and was found on a horizon of low grade phosphate that was roughly 20x10 feet. The gentleman who found the fossil said it was covering the horizon and that there were 20-30 3 inch diameter tooth whorls as well! So this material is supposedly associated with helicoprion fossils. The picture is the fossil as is, the guy that collected it POURED shellac over the entire surface The blue tinted 3d model is what I built today based on a surface scan of the rock.
  24. Howdy from Houston. I am a docent at the Houston Museum of Natural Science and am currently leading tours through our Fantastic new paleo hall. Because of their enthusiasm and questions I enjoy my younger tour member the most. Hearing a 4 year old say " Oh look over there. It's a stegosaurus!" really makes my day. I find that they like having things to handle and am looking for a couple of large (preferably fossil ) alligator gar scales to make a replica arrow with a gar scale point to bring out when discussing our alligator gar fossil. I am happy to buy or trade and also welcome suggestions about where to look to buy. I and my little future paleontologists thank you. I forgot to attach a picture of the shape I am looking for and that they should be at least an inch or so.
  25. Lepidotes scales

    From the album Vertebrates

    Lepidotes scales from lower Cretaceous of Spain.
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