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Found 50 results

  1. Hello! I found these beautiful scales inside a calcium phosphate nodule from Muncie Creek Shale. I believe this fish regurgitation might have some identifiable scales and I would love to know if anyone can nail down an exact species! Location: Missouri Time period: Pennsylvanian Formation: Muncie Creek Shale The center scale is roughly 9mm long! Concretion with Size reference other half of the concretion other half rotated More images and in their natural size (Not compressed) https://imgur.com/a/pWKw9Vk
  2. Hello! I was recently opening my Muncie Creek Shale nodules and this beautiful collection of scales and bone fragments came out! I believe it is fish regurgitation. Location: Missouri Time period: Pennsylvanian Formation: Muncie Creek Shale the middle scale is roughly 9mm long! other half of the concretion Outer view of the Concretion and size reference Images in their natural size (not compressed) https://imgur.com/a/pWKw9Vk
  3. Identification please

    Please help identify what I have here?
  4. Fish scales?

    What are these? Are these fish scales? Some look like denticles to me, but way too big. I really just don’t know. They may be from Kem Kem. I believe these entire pieces are just like a couple inches at the most, which should give you an idea of the size of the “scales”. If anyone can ID the actual species, that’d be awesome, but I’m actually asking more what they ARE, than what they’re FROM. As always, thank you so much for any help!
  5. Identification Please. Thinking foliage?

    Same rock, showing overall size
  6. I cover 5 counties in SW Mo for my job, and always go fossil hunting. Always crinoinds and their bedmates, unilt this. Low water crossing washed out, so I went hunting. I found this unique fossilation of something. The rock I drug home is 2' x 18". No other fossils except those pictured, anywhere else on the rock. There is another grouping of this same still in the creek, except still attached to creek bottom, that I cannot remove. This was found in Bryant Creek, east of Ava, Missouri in Douglas County. My thinking is possibly some type of foliage? There are no other characteristics. Thank you.
  7. Fossil hunting on a tray...

    Hi everyone , Since we’re on lockdown, I’ve been processing the little amount of micro matrix I had and a few interesting things have shown up. I’m mainly on the hunt for teeth but they are rather scarce and most of the matrix is composed of shell fragments. Some of the stuff I’ve been finding is crinoid stars, Bryozoans and fish scales. Most of this stuff is tiny and I actually can't tell what it is until I put it under the microscope. I’d be very grateful if you could ID some of the pieces as well. Here’s some of what I’ve found. I have more pictures but will post tomorrow. Here’s an interesting little tooth which I didn’t really do the best job of repairing but it was very small . Here’s what I thinks a little fish scale. I’m actually not sure what this is Here’s the only detailed complete crinoid star I’ve found so far. . Here is an absolutely tiny fish? tooth. I would say it looks croc but I’m not sure croc could possibly this small. I actually thought it was just a shard of a fish scale until I took a closer look under the microscope. And here are some bryzoans (that’s what I think they’re called). Im sorry about my very limited knowledge of these kinds of fossils. More pictures coming . That little tooth above was the second of the only three teeth I’ve found after a month of hunting. The third was so small that I think if it wasn’t originally adhered to the matrix, then it would have fallen through the sieve mesh.
  8. Hi Everyone, I’ve been living down in Texas with my family instead of my usual location in Missouri, and had a free day to go to the North Sulfur River (NSR). I had no idea my family lived so close to such a fun location to fossil hunt. I had a great time and have been trying to find the identity of a few of the fossils I found. I know identification posts are generally individually done, but since they were all found at the same location I decided to group them into one post. Hope that's not too against forum rules. Anyway, I’d love y'alls thoughts on what they might be! All the following were found in the North Sulfur River – Ozan formation. Number 1: This seems to me to be a jaw bone, but beyond that I'm unsure. Two possible growth teeth. What do you think? Number two: Are these bacculites end pieces? Number 3: I saw in another post these were identified as mammoth enamel. Think that is what they are or just something geological? I have a few more I'll include in a following post...
  9. Bird skull/ femur head

    Please help me with the identification You can ask me for more photos
  10. Looking to have growths id present on late cretaceous wood. The growths are the scales present on the wood. They appear to have been growing between wood layers. Wood is partly carbonized and not fully mineralized. Wood was drift wood mixed in with baculites and scaphites. Fossil taken in situ from upper part of Kevin mb of Marias Fm in Montana.
  11. Looks like something

    Hello all. I am no expert, just curious. I visited Greenbrier County West Virginia last July and picked up a few rocks along the banks of the Greenbrier River. After inspecting this one, I found what appears to be scales along its surface and a foot (arrow pointing). I have a lepidodendron root my uncle gave me the 1980s and it made me interested in fossils, just wondering if anyone can tell me what I’m looking at. Either way it’s a pretty neat find for me. If I should post more pictures, let me know. Thanks for any and all help!
  12. Looks reptilian to me

    1.5” X 1.0” tapers to blunt point. Structures up close with microscope are fantastic. the fractals And repetition scream complex multi cell but I have been duped many times by rock before. I don’t see how this couldn’t be flesh fossilized but hey. Found in southern Indiana, but in commercial river rock.
  13. Scaley

    I will try to get the front and back pics attached. Does anyone know what this is?
  14. L.S., Since animal fossils are definitely not my strongsuit, I would like to call upon the incredible collective knowledge here at TFF and ask your help with the identification of the fish remains shown below. This specimen comes from the Westphalian D (Pennsylvanian, Carboniferous) of the Piesberg quarry near Wallenhorst, Germany. The shape of the scales reminds me of images of rhizodont (?) fish scales, but this could very well be a superficial resemblance only... Penny for your thoughts? Kind regards, Tim
  15. Can anyone identify

  16. A little help please

    I found this last week Pretty cool kinda looks like a squished dinosaur haha what is it
  17. Hello forum, Recently I went to Walton on the Naze and I found a nodule on the beach that contained many fossil, some quite remarkable containing a shark tooth, scales, bones, fossilized wood and many more things to excavated. At first I was not going to pick it up ,as it was heavy (20lb to be exact). But I was upset to find out that I walked past a large megalodon tooth that someone else picked up. So here I am and now have this lump of rock, I have soak it for some time, to hopefully stop or slowdown pyritization. Now in the next few days I will be starting my prepping journey. Will anyone be able to give me advice, as I'm only using Dremel's, I wont be able to afford any thing else as it will not be in my budget. Opinion WANT TO REMOVE THE FOSSIL WOOD! THE SHELL ARE CHALKY DONT KNOW WHAT TO DO TO STOP THIS FROM FALLING APART? AND PREVENTING PYRITIZATION WITH NAIL POLISH OR CLEAR VARNISH ? Here are some pictures out of many.
  18. Enchodus scales

    Hello, Anyone have some Enchodus spp. scales to show please? Regards, Ricardo
  19. Help identify fossil pattern

    Found this interesting fossil over the weekend, can’t identify the pattern on it. Any thoughts?
  20. Partial coelacanth body

    From the album Fossildude's Late Triassic Lockatong Formation Fossils

    Partial coelacanth, Diplurus newarki. Scale is in CM. Late Triassic, Newark Supergroup, Newark Basin, Lockatong Formation, North Bergen, New Jersey. Old Granton Quarry.

    © © 2019 T. Jones

  21. I've been poking around in some Wellington fm micro matrix, permian age, Jackson Co, OK & thought I found a small worn spiral shell, so I put it with the other items I had pulled out. Later, when looking at the items closer, I realized it wasn't a shell & that I had some slightly crappy matrix... literally. A small coprolite 6 mm in length by 4 mm wide & containing what I think are fish scales. So now I'm digging through the matrix again to see if there is any more. The pics are with a dino lite with no photo stacking software, so please bear with them. This is the one thing I never even considerd that I might find in micro matrix.
  22. Although lizards are prime material for fakers, i think this tail is authentic. It is an unusial cast fossil. Kind of like a ghost form. It seems that the tail became detached. Much like they do today. This is cenomanian age amber. From Myanmar kachin state.
  23. Ocean Floor Fossil

    I found a fossil amongst a ton of ocean fossils, mostly crinoids but amongst other things. It is a bunch of dots on a rock .Any ideas at to what it is, maybe scales? Nearly all the rocks are fossils.
  24. Awesome Coprolite

    I just got an awesome coprolite. I generally hate those things, and would never pay money for one, but I came across this one and it has so many visible identifiable remains, I couldn't help being really impressed. Ive always wanted to see a coprolite that had clear remains in it. Sadly they're much smaller and harder to see in person than in these pictures, so I can only use these display pictures for the time being, until I take a magnified look. There's clearly fish scales, seemingly from different types of fish, and apparently squid hooks and such. I'm excited to find a good illuminated magnifying glass and really studying it up close:) Maybe even a microscope to take a closer look!
  25. Devonian fish scales

    With not a lot of new material to obsess with (broken arm) I have been going through old specimens to see if there are unfinished prepping and ID needed. Here is a set of scales/scale impressions collected in 2014 at Red Hill, late devonian (Famennian) site in Pennsylvania. Found in the shallow channel margin (red sediments) with what has been ID'd as a couple scapulocoracoids of the acanthodian, Gyracanthus (plus a fin spine). They are almost certainly sarcopterygian but not sure what clade. Has anyone, Archie? seen similar scales. Thought they might be Holoptychius but they don't look like the classic Holoptychius scales and they were not at all common in this upriver environment. Doug Rowe who oversees the site and runs the outstanding museum there, suggested they might be Rhizodont but nothing I've seen of Rhizodont scales looks anything like these. Thanks for any help.
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