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Found 120 results

  1. Sharktooth Hill shortfin mako?

    Despite several visits to Sharktooth Hill and hundreds of teeth, I've yet to confirm a shortfin mako (Isurus oxyrinchus or is it Isurus desori?). Perhaps this is a possible candidate. Or maybe another C. planus or C. hastalis lower. To me, the features that make this one look different from those other common STH teeth are that it is relatively long with a narrow base/wide root, and also that little bend at the tip when viewed from the side (I think it shows up in the bottom two pics ok). It just stuck out as "something different" and I was able to eliminate a lot of other possibilities. So maybe I got my first shortfin mako? Thanks for your help!
  2. I recently had a chance to try my hand at a few matrix pieces from Sharktooth Hill. I'm happy with how they came out, although I know I could do a better job next time. Huge shout out to @digit and @ynot for their advice and encouragement. I think the thing I appreciate about matrix pieces like these are that prepping them this way can turn a rather unremarkable tooth into something unique. Anyway, I had fun doing it and I was encouraged to post a "trip report" so here goes... Here's how they looked when I got home. Nice to find out the tooth was intact. WooHoo! I used dental tools (nice set online for <$20) and small paintbrushes to scratch away the matrix. A super soft fluffy brush I found in my wife's makeup kit (shhhh!) was great for removing loosened silt. The matrix looks wet because I was dipping a finger in water and barely touching the matrix to soften it. Not too much though because that Sharktooth Hill matrix can be really soft. When I got more experienced I started using a small paintbrush to apply the water more carefully. Oh nooooooooooo! The tooth fell out. Does that happen to anyone else? I decided that meant the tooth just wanted to be cleaned so I took the opportunity. A quick clean up and a little CA glue and we are back in business. QUESTION: How do the rest of you actually get the tooth clean? There was no way I was going to be able to wash it or use a toothbrush or anything like that. I can tell myself "I like them a little dirty" but can't help but notice that some people get them really nice and clean. Any tips? Esp. with that STH matrix.
  3. We know that fossils are not the priority for people at the moment. They are not for us either but I have found a good amount of stress relief in going through a large donation we got. The material is all from STH and we have enough to make a trade. It was part of the donation actually. Extra fossils for sale or for trade to improve our collection. I would like to avoid sales or doing smaller trades just for shipping reasons so I decided to put the trade stuff out as one lot. Given the current state of the world, consider this a post corona virus trade offer. We would probably not ship for 2-4 weeks if not a bit longer so we would not expect immediate shipping. Nobody needs to risk a trip to the post office. I did however want to put it out there. I think a little engagement among fossil nerds may be a good thing at this time We tried to put together a pretty decent representation of the shark and ray fauna plus a variety of colors. Miocene Temblor Formation, Round Mountain Silt Member Kern County, California Carcharodon hastalis- 8 teeth, variety of positions, variety of colors, none bigger than 1.5" Cosmopolitodus planus- 8 teeth, upper and lower, beautiful color array Isurus desori- 1 tooth Hemiprisitis serra- 1 symphyseal tooth Hexanchus andersonii- one partial tooth (I think upper) Heterodontus- 1 lateral tooth Physogaleus- 4 teeth Galeocerdo- 3 teeth Carcharhinus- 3 teeth Squatina Squalus Galeorhinus Included but not pictured- a couple of Cetorhinus teeth and a Mustelus tooth. Various Batoid fossils. We are open to any shark tooth offers but we do have some specific needs/wants. I listed them below. GW teeth Squaliformes- any family except Squalus Orectolobiformes- Hemiscyllium, Rhincodon, Ginglymostoma (Eocene & Cretaceous) Otodus sokolovi Isurus oxyrinchus and retroflexus some specific Cretaceous material- Cardabiodontid, Squatina, Ginglymostoma, Cretorectolobus, Odontaspis, Cantioscyllium, Cretoxyrhina PM us if you have any questions, need to see additional pictures, or want to make an offer.
  4. We got a large donation of STH fossil material from @JBMugu recently. I have been working from home for a week now and this has given me time to break down the large amount of material. There has been lots of sorting, some light cleaning, and quite a bit of time at the microscope as he gave us quite a bit of micro matrix to go through and that can be pretty time consuming. I thought it might be fun to go through the donation and show the progress we have made in sorting through so many fossils. This donation is so large that we got fossils that will not only bolster the displays and give us loads of give away teeth for the kids but we also have some trade material from this as well. We not only got a huge boost to the shark programs but the marine mammal program was boosted and even the dinosaurs got a lift from a bird bone. The first step was going through each item that was already set aside. Easiest part lol Next we sorted through the large bags of shark teeth to separate the complete/mostly complete teeth from the broken ones. Then we sorted through the complete teeth to separate by order and then family/genus. Once we had done all that, the material got a further sorting based on items being used in displays, giveaways, hands on fossils, and potential trade teeth. After we got those basic sorting out of the way, I began sorting through the micros. Hardest part but the most fun for sure. I also sorted out a few teeth for our good friend @Tay Francis and he will be getting some of micro matrix too. We got some incredible teeth. We got a 2" Cosmopolitodus hastalis upper and a huge lower tooh ( a bit of root restoration but really awesome) plus loads of smaller teeth from various positions. We got loads of really pretty planus teeth including a couple of large ones, 1.75" inches. I found a few Isurus desori and they may be my favorites so far. 8 that I can say with some degree of confidence are desori. Gorgeous colors. We got a beautiful lower Hexanchus and found a small partial lower. We got a couple of really nice Hemipristis teeth and found two symphyseal teeth. We got a partial STH Meg and a giant 6" east coast Meg. Plenty of Galeocerdo and Physogaleus teeth. We found quite a few Carcharhinus teeth. I need to take a closer look to get the specific ID's. We also got a very rare and awesome Echinorhinus tooth !! We got excellent batoid material and have found plenty in the micros. The marine mammal teeth are awesome. We got a fantastic Cetacean vert and a small bird bone. Jesse also included some great matrix pieces for us to show the kids too and a beautiful shark vert. The micros have been a really pleasant surprise. I have found about 10 Heterodontus teeth so far which is more than I had thought. The colors on the Squatina teeth are awesome. I love the Tope Shark teeth. We have found a couple of really interesting teeth. We found one that according to Elasmo would seem to fit the Triakis type tooth that can be found in STH micro stuff. We found one that I am 99% sure is a Scyliorhinus tooth. We found one that looks like it might be an Alopias tooth. Not sure on the ID on it but it is an interesting tooth. I have found far fewer Mustelus teeth than I thought but I have found two so we can add that to our display. I think we have found at least one example of all batoids. We even found a tiny shark vert ! We are still processing micros and will not be able to show off the displays until we get more rikers lol We want to thank Jesse for his generosity and continued support of what we do. This improves what can we do and how we do it. It will also allow us to further improve our collection through a trade or two which we really never get to do. Enjoy the pictures
  5. A couple of STH ID’s needed

    As I’ve gone through the donation of STH material we received, I have found a couple of shark teeth that I can not ID. My picture capability is limited to my phone so I apologize for picture quality. I thought the first tooth looks something like a Hemipristis symphyseal tooth but I could be off base. It appears to be a complete tooth as I see no evidence of the root being broken.
  6. Hello, The indentions in these two pieces of Sharktooth Hill bone are very unlike anything else I've found there and I'm hoping someone recognizes them. Very smooth and very round, about 2-4 mm deep. I'm including pics of the backs of the pieces, not because they seem interesting, but just so you can see that they're not. It's a little hard to tell, but the large piece has a partial indention on one of the broken edges on the right side of the pic. Thanks for any insights you can offer! Larger piece - Front Larger piece - Back Smaller piece - Front Smaller piece - Back
  7. Found this thing today in my Sharktooth Hill bucket-o-bones and my first thought was "fossil oreo" so I was very intrigued to learn that there actually are fossil "cookies!" I even think I found one (not posted here). But this one is a sandwich cookie. I have pics from top, bottom, and all around the edges. The large hole you can see from the edge view goes straight through all the way. If what I learned about "cookies" is applicable, I would imagine they would be like caps on the two flat surfaces of my bone, and are therefore missing on this specimen? So I guess it's a vertebra? Ideas on what animal, what part of the spine, (or how many million miles off I am) would be greatly appreciated. Thanks!!
  8. Beside all the bone fragments I've seen from Sharktooth Hill, this one really stood out. I'm hoping that the relatively good condition it is in will allow for identification. Taking a swing at it, I'll say turtle but definitely not too sure. All 3 pics are the same bone. Thanks!
  9. a little STH ID help needed

    As we work on our new displays I have found a few shark teeth that I need to verify an ID for. These are all from STH. First up is one I am fairly certain is Isurus desori. A little over .5”
  10. Sorry, but I barely know where to begin describing this. Happy to field questions or take different pics if that helps. What I DO know is that this seems much different from all the other teeth and bones I brought home from Sharktooth Hill. It is lighter weight than the other teeth and bones and seems to be composed of a pair of something with a plate on the bottom and sinuses in the back. The first pic shows what I'm calling the "top." Then if you tip that backwards you can see a smooth plate of some sort on what I'm calling the "bottom" And if you continue to roll it backwards now we see the hollow sinuses on what I'm calling the "back" side. Finally, here's a slightly different view from the front with it tilted just slightly upwards compared to the first pic in this post. Seems to be some wear on the edges pointing forward. Does this ring a bell for anyone? I'd sure love to know what I found. Thank you!
  11. Hello, I am having some trouble IDing this tiny tooth found in some micromatrix from Sharktooth Hill. I believe I've narrowed it down to a smoothhound (Triakidae mustelus) or guitarfish (Rhinobatos) but of course others are probably possible as well. Thank you very much!
  12. Sharktooth Hill unknowns

    I had few more oddballs. As always your input is appreciated. Here's the first one.
  13. Hello, While sorting through my Sharktooth Hill micro matrix I came across some very distinctive teeth that I'm hoping someone can identify. Image 1 shows three very similar teeth in different orientations. They differ from most others I've been seeing in that they ha ve 3 roots and three "tiers" - best shown in the orientation of the specimen on the far left (root, base, top). The other teeth in images 2 and 3 remind me of Squalus and I suspect that's what they are. But they seem to be missing a part (the exact same part) and don't appear to me to be obviously broken. Is there anything else they could be? Thank you very much!
  14. Hello all! A few weeks ago, @caldigger generously sent me some micromatrix from Sharktooth Hill/Bakersfield in California (Miocene in age), and there is one little fossil that is kind of weird - hopefully someone can help me identify it! It's smooth on one side and has sharp bumps on the other side - please feel free to let me know what you think it might be. If better pictures are required, we'll have to wait until I get some sunlight up here in Mississauga - hopefully soon! Thanks in advance! Monica View of the bumpy side: View of the smooth side: View of the bumps:
  15. Yesterday, I got back from a family vacation to California. While there, I was able to spend two days digging at the Ernst Quarries. The weather was beautiful and the teeth were plentiful! Carcharodon planus hiding in the rock.
  16. Dug this little guy out today from same deposit as Sharktooth Hill location ( Mid. Miocene ). What I would like to know is this from a juvenile or a small posterior adult tooth. It is prepped labial side showing. Thanks for your insights.
  17. I'd love some thoughts on some of these recent finds from Sharktooth Hill. Thanks in advance! These ones, I think, are porcupinefish mouth plate pieces, but I have no experience with them. These seem like fish teeth. Parrotfish or related??? The two views are the same pieces, with interesting "toothy" parts on both surfaces. I can see the bottom pic maybe showing palatine teeth??? And finally this has me totally stumped. While collecting we saved it saying, "that's gotta be something" still still don't have a clue. Bottom pic is side view.
  18. Unusual STH tooth

    Going through my recent find from Sharktooth Hill I came across this one that was very different from any others I've seen from there. Possible bramble shark? Not many options that look like this. Your thoughts on it are appreciated! Picture isn't the greatest, but I'm hoping it's distinctive enough.
  19. It is becoming to Fossils on Wheels tradition to do a program way ahead of schedule lol I just booked our first marine mammal themed program This is about 5 months before I thought we would be ready but we do not turn down opportunities to do our thing in a classroom. The program is a look at the Miocene featuring marine mammal and shark fossils. We have just enough fossil material to touch on the West and East Coasts of the United States during this time. In fact, we have just enough material to do the program at all but we did this with dinosaurs last year and it worked out just fine. I am really quite excited to talk about marine mammals. This is something I wanted to do last spring but we figured Dinosaurs would be the program that got us attention. Now we can have a little fun and expand on what we can already do quite well. Carter and I can follow the same formula of scientific information enhanced with touch fossils. We have some cool material from STH including some nice touch fossils, a couple of decent Cetacean pieces from the East Coast and shark fossils. We may not have all the fossils that I would want to do this with but I think we have enough to give the kiddos a really great hands-on experience. We can explore some interesting Cetacean adaptations such as echolocation, intelligence, communication, and migration. We can discuss the different feeding styles of whales and why they super-sized themselves. We can balance these adaptations with shark adaptations and fun facts about evolution and theories regarding the extinction of Megalodon. This also gives a chance to really get into the fauna of Sharktooth Hill. I grew up a few hours from STH and it remains the only formation I have collected in personally. We use a number of sharks from STH in the shark program but this is different. We will focus on it while touching on the East Coast of the US. I am pretty excited to get into detail about a really cool part of the natural history of California with our local kiddos. It is going to be fun and I feel pretty confident that we can pull this one off. I have three weeks to work on the presentation plus the kids will get free fossils which helps. I will be nervous like I was when we debuted the dinos but that is not a bad thing. It drove me to make sure we did our absolute best in every presentation. I am excited and will update TFF on the how well this one is received since there are so many STH collectors on the here !!
  20. Sharktooth Hill Trip Report Part 1 – building the sifting table Hi everyone, After my first trip to Sharktooth Hill in June, I was hooked. I immediately started making plans to return and, this time I’d come better prepared. This forum has provided an amazing source of ideas and helpful people and inspired me to build a sifting table for my next trip to STH. A huge thanks to those who have helped me by answering questions, providing pictures and ideas, and helping me troubleshoot. I gathered as much info as I could and then tried to combine all the best ideas into one contraption to fit my needs. I’m excited to try this beast out next week! It’s big! The screen is 37.5” x 21” and the table stands about 4 feet tall but I will lower it if the height proves too high to load easily. I don’t want to sacrifice “wobbly-ness” though, because I’m hoping that’s going to do a lot of the sifting work for me. Plus, my son and I are 6’5” and 6’4” so a tall table should be ok. I used SCH 40 PVC and the 2 rectangular bases are glued while the 4 legs are removable to allow for compact storage/transport. In limited testing everything stayed together but I’ll bring some PVC glue with me in case I need to solidify it in the field. I'll also bring my PVC cutter for “disassembly” for the way home if need be. The bottom tier is ¼” mesh and has 6 “T” brackets to make sure it stays on top of the PVC frame. I bolted on a handle to allow it to be shaken one- or two-handed. There are no pointy parts on the inside (trying to avoid bleeding as much as I did on my last visit to STH). The top tier is ½” mesh and sits inside the bottom tier. Corner braces in the bottom tier (see above) allow the upper tier to sit low enough that it won’t dislodge but high enough that the contents can move freely across the bottom mesh. Initially I was disappointed that the large size and my inability to “tighten” that mesh caused it to sag noticeably once it was loaded up with soil. I remedied this with the addition of an adjustable bracket along the midpoint. But then when I put the top tier inside the bottom tier I realized I’d created a teeter-totter (doh!) and had to chisel out a groove on each side to allow it to fit in there. I’m very excited to go give it a try and I hope you all find this pre-trip report interesting. I’m happy to answer any questions and/or accept suggestions for improvement. And thanks again to all the helpful people on this forum whose previous pictures, design notes, and conversations encouraged me to attempt this (and make this post). I’ll send a follow up trip report after I get home. Cheers!
  21. Bones from Sharktooth Hill

    Hello, I returned from Sharktooth Hill (Bakersfield) with a bunch of bone fragments that seem to be mostly whale ribs and unidentifiable fragments. But I did have a few pieces that seemed distinctive enough that I thought someone more knowledgeable than me might be able to recognize. The third one from the top looks very similar to something another member posted (though not identified) - one side looks exactly like driftwood (is this known form STH?) but the other side very different, as shown in the pics. Someday I hope to be on the help-delivering side of the equation in this forum. Until then, much gratitude!
  22. Hello, Going through some teeth from Sharktooth Hill (Bakersfield) I found one tooth among my "C. planus" teeth that didn't look like the others. I'm wondering if it is natural variation, from a different part of the jaw, or from another species altogether. It has the characteristic curve of a C. planus upper, but is quite a bit narrower than all the others I collected. The pics attached show a "typical" C. planus on the left and the tooth in question on the right. Thanks!
  23. Hello, I'm new to this but hoping to get more involved. I went to the world-famous Sharktooth Hill (Bakersfield CA) last week and it did not disappoint! I am now trying to ID the ~150 teeth we found but I'm not very good at it (yet?). I did a bunch of the easier ones and had some on-site help from more knowledgeable collectors that was great. Lots of unknowns still, though. If anyone could offer any tips for how to go about IDing these teeth, that would be awesome (ex. Carcharhinus spp. Vs Negaprion? Or Isurus/Carcharodon planus Vs hastalis?) I also suspect I have some Isurus oxyrinchus/desori but not sure how to distinguish them from the rest. So, please feel free to point out what you think any of the pictured teeth are, and/or what features I should look for to get better at this. I can send additional angles of anything that might be helpful, as needed. Thanks in advance!
  24. Sharktooth Hill Whale Vertebra

    Earlier this summer I had a chance to dig at Slow Curve at Ernst Quarries. A few teeth were found along with a small dolphin vertebra, but the best find was this large whale(?) vertebra I pulled out as the rain clouds were quickly approaching. From my internet research, I believe it is a whale lumbar vertebra, but that is all I could determine. Whatever it is, I feel lucky to have found it and want to know as much as I can about it! Is there any chance to pin down anything more specific about this piece, such as species? Ideally, I would like to reconstruct the broken processes and make a display. Are there any collections of images for whale vertebrae that could also help with identification? (I couldn't find any good sources while searching) Am I correct in thinking the two parallel broken processes in the second image were the top (dorsal?) of the bone? Is it possible to tell which way the bone faced toward the head and tail originally? I appreciate any help that you guys and gals can provide! Each of the photos has a US quarter, Euro, and centimeter scale for reference. (I first tried photos with lights on both sides, but then the shape of the vertebra was very difficult to see.)
  25. Are these lemon shark teeth? Or black tip? Or something else entirely? How do you tell the difference between lemon and black tip shark teeth? These are from the temblor formation, slow curve ernst quarry.
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