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Found 3 results

  1. Temnospondyl help

    Here's a hard one: This is a very nice temnospondyl skeleton (you can see the sclerotic rings!). It measures about 11cm long from snout to what is preserved of the tail. My question is: Can anyone tell me the genus/species and provenance of the fossil? I was told by the previous owner that it was possibly Platyrhinops from the Lower Triassic of Germany, but I have no idea. It looks like maybe a very well preserved Permian age Discosauriscus from the Czech Republic or some sort of temnospondyly from the Pfalz of Germany. I am happy to share more photos. Thanks for the help :-)
  2. Here is a Melanerpeton humbergense. I acquired this lower Permian branchiosaurid recently from a well-known dealer in the Netherlands. I had been eyeing this specimen for some time and decided now would be a good time as ever to pull the trigger on it. Even with some bone missing it was a nice price for a nice creature that probably would have been about 12 centimeters long in life or close to it. Much of the fun of fossils for me is to find and read as much material on them as I can. The most prominent recent paper on Melanerpeton is TIMELESS DESIGN: COLORED PATTERN OF SKIN IN EARLY PERMIAN BRANCHIOSAURIDS (TEMNOSPONDYLI: DISSOROPHOIDEA) (Werneburg 2009) regarding a 19 cm long specimen of Melanerpton tenerum found at Börtewitz in Saxony. This paper describes a "spotted pattern of skin color" which feature patterned spots (gaps in the pigmentation?) of about 2 to 5 millimeters in width. The fossil I own has been identified by the seller as Melanerpeton humbergense and is from a completely different location, Odernheim in Pfalz. I am somewhat confident in those IDs of location and species. The stone closely resembles other branchiosaur specimens from Pfalz I have seen internet photos of. I can find no contra-indicatory features in my fossil to the rather detailed description of M. humbergense in THE INTRARELATIONSHIPS AND EVOLUTIONARY HISTORY OF THE TEMNOSPONDYL FAMILY BRANCHIOSAURIDAE (Schoch, Milner 2008). M. humbergense is a different species from a different location of a slightly different stratigraphy than M. tenerum. Still, there is color on the stone of my fossil that may suggest a possible pattern of open circles. I present this fossil to the forum for open consideration of this feature. I seek to avoid a confirmation bias and hope to get an understanding of what is there, whether that understanding is positive or negative. Hopefully there are some European collectors here who have seen many of these before in hand, and collectors familiar with the preparatory methods used. Per the seller, there has been no restoration. The fossil seems to show none of the protective surface coating often applied to branchiosaur specimens from other sellers. Factors that may be negative to a confirmation of patterned pigmentation to this specimen: M. tenerum and M. humbergense are different species from different locations from a different stratigraphic period. None of the possible 'patterned circles' seem to be evident on my fossil's tail, only a portion of the thorax, There is no counterpart impression to examine. Per Werneburg "Hundreds of branchiosaurid specimens are known from the vertebrate Lagerstaette Börtewitz, but only one is preserved with colored skin pattern. " This would suggest that finding a branchiosaurid with colored skin pattern would be very improbable. More photos will be posted after this initial photo. Thank you for looking, and I hope you enjoy this little bit of mystery as much as I do.
  3. These are a few of the pdf files (and a few Microsoft Word documents) that I've accumulated in my web browsing. MOST of these are hyperlinked to their source. If you want one that is not hyperlinked or if the link isn't working, e-mail me at joegallo1954@gmail.com and I'll be happy to send it to you. Please note that this list will be updated continuously as I find more available resources. All of these files are freely available on the Internet so there should be no copyright issues. Articles with author names in RED are new additions since November 22, 2017. Class Amphibia "Amphibia" sensu lato Subclass (?) "Labyrinthodontia" (Paraphyletic) Order incertae sedis Hook, R.W. (1983). Colosteus scutellatus (Newberry), a Primitive Temnospondyl Amphibian from the Middle Pennsylvanian of Linton, Ohio. American Museum Novitates, Number 2270. Smithson, T.R. (1982). The cranial morphology of Greererpeton burkemorani Romer (Amphibia: Temnospondyli). Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society, 76. Smithson, T.R. (1980). A New Labyrinthodont Amphibian from the Carboniferous of Scotland. Palaeontology, Vol.23, Part 4. Order Temnospondyli Superfamily Edopoidea Milner, A.R. and S.E.K. Sequeira (1998). A cochleosaurid temnospondyl amphibian from the Middle Pennsylvanian of Linton, Ohio, U.S.A. In: A study of fossil vertebrates. Norman, D.B., A.R. Milner and A.C. Milner (eds.), Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society, 122. Rieppel, O. (1980). The Edopoid Amphibian Cochleosaurus from the Middle Pennsylvanian of Nova Scotia. Palaeontology, Vol.23, Part 1. Steyer, J.S., et al. (2006). The Vertebrate Fauna of the Upper Permian of Niger. IV. Nigerpeton ricqlesi (Temnospondyli: Cochleosauridae), and the Edopoid Colonization of Gondwana. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, 26(1). Superfamily incertae sedis Damiani, R., et al. (2006). The Vertebrate Fauna of the Upper Permian of Niger. V. The Primitive Temnospondyl Saharastega moradiensis. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, 26(3). Sequeira, S.E.K. and A.R. Milner (1993). The Temnospondyl Amphibian Capetus from the Upper Carboniferous of the Czech Republic. Palaeontology, Vol.36, Part 3. Family Dendrerpetonidae Godfrey, S.J., A.R. Fiorillo and R.L. Carroll (1987). A newly discovered skull of the temnospondyl amphibian Dendrerpeton acadianum Owen. Can.J. Earth Sci., Vol.24. Milner, A.R. (1980). The Temnospondyl Amphibian Dendrerpeton from the Upper Carboniferous of Ireland. Palaeontology, Vol.23, Part 1. Suborder Dvinosauria Case, E.C. (1935). Description of a Collection of Associated Skeletons of Trimerorhachis. Contributions from the Museum of Paleontology - University of Michigan, Vol.IV, Number 13. Chase, J.N. (1965). Neldasaurus wrightae, a new rhachitomous labyrinthodont from the Texas Lower Permian. Bulletin of the Museum of Comparative Zoology, 133. Colbert, E.H. (1955). Scales in the Permian Amphibian Trimerorhachis. American Museum Novitates, Number 1740. Milner, A.R. and R.R. Schoch (2013). Trimerorhachis (Amphibia: Temnospondyli) from the Lower Permian of Texas and New Mexico: cranial osteology, taxonomy and biostratigraphy. N.Jb.Geol.Palaont. Abh., 270/1. Pawley, K. (2007). The Postcranial Skeleton of Trimerorhachis insignis Cope, 1878 (Temnospondyli: Trimerorhachidae): A Plesiomorphic Temnospondyl from the Lower Permian of North America. J.Paleont., 81(5). Williston, S.W. (1916). The Skeleton of Trimerorhachis. The Journal of Geology, Vol.24, Number 3. Williston, S.W. (1915). Trimerorhachis, A Permian Temnospondyl Amphibian. The Journal of Geology, Vol.23, Number 3. Suborder Euskelia Superfamily Dissorophoidea Anderson, J.S., et al. (2008). Georgenthalia clavinasica, a New Genus and Species of Dissorophoid Temnospondyl from the Early Permian of Germany, and the Relationships of the Family Amphibamidae. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, 28(1). Berman, D.S., et al. (2010). A New Trematopid Amphibian (Temnospondyli: Dissorophoidea) from the Upper Pennsylvanian of Western Pennsylvania: Earliest Record of Terrestrial Vertebrates Responding to a Warmer, Drier Climate. Annals of Carnegie Museum, Vol.78, Number 4. Bolt, J.R. (1977). Cacops (Amphibia: Labyrinthodontia) from the Fort Sill Locality, Lower Permian of Oklahoma. Fieldiana Geology, Vol.37, Number 3. Frobisch, N.B. and R.R. Schoch (2009). The largest specimen of Apateon and the life history pathway of neoteny in the Paleozoic temnospondyl family Branchiosauridae. Fossil Record, 12(1). Frobisch, N.B. and R.R. Reisz (2008). A New Lower Permian Amphibamid (Dissorophoidea, Temnospondyli) from the Fissure Fill Deposits Near Richards Spur, Oklahoma. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, 28(4). Milner, A.R. (1985). On the Identity of the Amphibian Hesperoherpeton garnettense from the Upper Pennsylvanian of Kansas. Palaeontology, Vol.28, Part 4. Milner, A.R. (1982). Small Temnospondyl Amphibians from the Middle Pennsylvanian of Illinois. Palaeontology, Vol.25, Part 3. Milner, A.R. and S.E.K. Sequeria (2003). Revision of the amphibian genus Limnerpeton (Temnospondyli) from the Upper Carboniferous of the Czech Republic. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, 48(1). Polley, B. (2009). A New Lower Permian Trematopid (Temnospondyli: Dissorophoidea) from Richards Spur, Oklahoma. Masters Thesis - University of Toronto. Reisz, R.R., R.R. Schoch and J.S. Anderson (2009). The armoured dissorophid Cacops from the Early Permian of Oklahoma and the exploitation of the terrestrial realm by amphibians. Naturwissenschaften. Schoch, R.R. (2014). First evidence of the branchiosaurid temnospondyl Leptorophus in the Early Permian of the Saar-Nahe Basin (SW Germany). N.Jb.Geol.Palaont. Abh., 272/2. Schoch, R.R. (2004). Skeleton Formation in the Branchiosauridae: A Case Study in Comparing Ontogenetic Trajectories. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, 24(2). Sumida, S.S., D.S. Berman and T. Martens (1998). A New Trematopid Amphibian from the Lower Permian of Central Germany. Palaeontology, Vol.41, Part 4. Watson, D.M.S. (1963). On Growth Stages in Branchiosaurs. Palaeontology, Vol.6, Part 3. Werneburg, R. (2007). Timeless Design: Colored Pattern of Skin in Early Permian Branchiosaurids (Temnospondyli: Dissorophoidea). Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, 27(4). Werneburg, R. (2003). The branchiosaurid amphibians from the Lower Permian of Buxieres-les-Mines, l'Archambault Basin (Allier, France) and their biostratigraphic significance. Bull.Soc.geol.Fr., Vol.174, Number 4. (14.6MB) Werneburg, R., A. Ronchi and J.W. Schneider (2007). The Early Permian Branchiosaurids (Amphibia) of Sardinia (Italy): Systematic Palaeontology, Palaeoecology, Biostratigraphy and Palaeobiogeographic Problems. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, 252. Witzmann, F. (2009). Cannibalism in a small growth stage of the Early Permian branchiosaurid Apateon gracilis (Credner, 1881) from Saxony. Fossil Record, 12(1). Zajic, J., A.R. Milner and J. Klembara (1990). The first partially articulated amphibian (Temnospondyli: Dissorophoidea) from the Line Formation (Stephanian C, central Bohemia). Vestnik Ustredniho ustavu geologickeho, 65(6). Superfamily Eryopoidea Carroll, R.L. (1964). The Relationships of the Rhachitomous Amphibian Parioxys. American Museum Novitates, Number 2167. Dempster, W.T. (1934). The Brain Case and Endocranial Cast of Eryops megacephalus (Cope). The Journal of Comparative Neurology, Vol.62, Number 1. Gregory, R.W. Miner, and G.K. Noble (1923). The Carpus of Eryops and the Structure of the Primitive Chiropterygium. Bulletin American Museum of Natural History, Vol. XLVIII, Article X. Lucas, S.G., L.F. Rinehart and A.P. Hunt (2005). Eryops (Amphibia, Temnospondyli) from the Upper Pennsylvanian of El Cobre Canyon, New Mexico. In: The Permian of Central New Mexico. Lucas, S.G., K.E. Zeigler and J.A. Spielmann (eds.), New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science, Bulletin Number 31. Miner, R.W. (1925). The Pectoral Limb of Eryops and Other Primitive Tetrapods. Bulletin of the American Museum of Natural History, Vol. LI, Article VII. Moulton, J.M. (1974). A Description of the Vertebral Column of Eryops Based on the Notes and Drawings of A.S. Romer. Breviora, Number 428. Murphy, J.L. (1971). Eryopsid Remains from the Conemaugh Group, Braxton County, West Virginia. Southeastern Geology, Vol.XIII, Number 4. Paton, R.L. (1975). A Lower Permian Temnospondylous Amphibian from the English Midlands. Palaeontology, Vol.18, Part 4. Werneberg, R. and D.S. Berman (2012). Revision of the Aquatic Eryopid Temnospondyl Glaukerpeton avinoffi Romer, 1952, from the Upper Pennsylvanian of North America. Annals of Carnegie Museum, Vol.81, Number 1. Werneberg, R., et al. (2010). First Pennsylvanian Eryops (Temnospondyli) and Its Permian Record from New Mexico. In: Carb-Permian transition in Canon del Cobre. Lucas, S.G., et al. (eds.), New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science, Bulletin 49. Clade Limnarchia Clade Stereosponylomorpha Superfamily Archegosauroidea Lohmann, U. and S. Sachs (2001). Observations on the Postcranial Morphology, Ontogeny and Palaeobiology of Sclerocephalus haeuseri (Amphibia: Actinodontidae) from the Lower Permian of Southwest Germany. Memoirs of the Queensland Museum, Brisbane. Milner, A.R. (1978). A Reappraisal of the Early Permian Amphibians Memonomenos dyscriton and Cricotillus brachydens. Palaeontology, Vol.21, Part 3. Schoch, R.R. (2003). Early Larval Ontogeny of the Permo-Carboniferous Temnospondyl Sclerocephalus. Palaeontology, Vol.46, Part 5. Schoch, R.R. and F. Witzmann (2009). Osteology and relationships of the temnospondyl genus Sclerocephalus. Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society, 157. Witzmann, F. and R.R. Schoch (2006). The Postcranium of Archegosaurus decheni, and a Phylogenetic Analysis of Temnospondyl Postcrania. Palaeontology, Vol.49, Part 6. Suborder Stereospondyli Case, E.C. (1931). Description of a New Species of Buettneria, With a Discussion of the Brain Case. Contributions from the Museum of Paleontology, Vol.III, Number 11. Dias, E.V. and M. Richter (2002). On the squamation of Australerpeton cosgriffi Barberena, a temnospondyl amphibian from the Upper Permian of Brazil. Anais de Academia Brasileira de Ciencias, 74(3). Dias, E.V. and C.L. Schultz (2003). The First Paleozoic Temnospondyl Postcranial Skeleton from South America. Revista Brasileira de Paleontologia, 6. Eltink, E. and M.C. Langer (2014). A New Specimen of the Temnospondyl Australerpeton cosgriffi from the Late Permian of Brazil (Rio Do Rasto Formation, Paraná Basin): Comparative Anatomy and Phylogenetic Relationships. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, 34(3). Hewison, R.H. (1996). The Skull of Deltacephalus whitei, A Temnospondyl Amphibian from the Lower Triassic of Madagascar. Palaeontology, Vol.39, Part 2. Pawley, K. and A. Warren (2005). A Terrestrial Stereospondyl from the Lower Triassic of South Africa: The Postcranial Skeleton of Lydekkerina huxleyi (Amphibia: Temnospondyli). Palaeontology, Vol.48, Part 2. Piñeiro, G., A. Ramos and C. Mariscano (2012). A rhinesuchid-like temnospondyl from the Permo-Triassic of Uruguay. C.R. Palevol, 11. Ruta, M. and J.R. Bolt (2008). The brachyopoid Hadrokkosaurus bradyi from the early Middle Triassic of Arizona, and a phylogenetic analysis of lower jaw characters in temnospondyl amphibians. Acta Paleontologica Polonica, 53(4 ). Warren, A.A., et al. (2001). Oldest Known Stereospondylous Amphibian from the Early Permian of Namibia. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, 21(1). Clade Capitosauria Fortuny, J., A. Galobart and C. De Santisteban (2011). A new capitosaur from the Middle Triassic of Spain and the relationships within the Capitosauria. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, 56(3). Schoch, R.R. (2008). The Capitosauria (Amphibia): characters, phylogeny and stratigraphy. Palaeodiversity, 1. Schoch, R.R., et al. (2007). Anatomy and relationships of the Triassic temnospondyl Sclerothorax. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, 52(1). Superfamily Mastodonsauroidea Damiani, R.J. (2008). A giant skull of the temnospondyl Xenotosuchus africanus from the Middle Triassic of South Africa and its ontogenetic implications. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, 53(1). Damiani, R.J. (2001). A systematic revision and phylogenetic analysis of Triassic mastodonsauroids (Temnospondyli: Stereospondyli). Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society, 133. Howie, A.A. (1970). A New Capitosaurid Labyrinthodont from East Africa. Palaeontology, Vol.13, Part 2. Moser, M. and R. Schoch (2007). Revision of the Type Material and Nomenclature of Mastodonsaurus giganteus (Jaeger) (Temnospondyli) from the Middle Triassic of Germany. Palaeontology, Vol.50, Part 5. Paton, R.L. (1974). Capitosaurid Labyrinthodonts from the Trias of England. Palaeontology, Vol.17, Part 2. Sidor, C.A., J.S. Steyer and R. Damiani (2007). Parotosuchus (Temnospondyli: Mastodonsauridae) from the Triassic of Antarctica. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, 27(1). Sulej, T. and G. Niedzwiedzki (2013). A new large capitosaurid temnospondyl amphibian from the Early Triassic of Poland. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, 58(1). Warren, A.A. and M.N. Hutchinson (1988). A New Capitosaurid Amphibian from the Early Triassic of Queensland, and the Ontogeny of the Capitosaur Skull. Palaeontology, Vol.31, Part 3. Infraorder Trematosauria Superfamily Brachyopoidea Damiani, R.J. and A.M. Jeannot (2002). A Brachyopid Temnospondyl from the Lower Cynognathus Assemblage Zone in the Northern Karoo Basin, South Africa. Palaeont.afr., 38. Warren, A.A. and C. Marsicano (2000). A Phylogeny of the Brachyopoidea (Temnospondyli, Stereospondyli). Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, 20(3). Warren, A.A. and M.N. Hutchinson (1983). The Last Labyrinthodont? A New Brachyopoid (Amphibia, Temnospondyli) from the Early Jurassic Evergreen Formation of Queensland, Australia. Proc.Trans.R.Soc.Lond. B, 303. Superfamily Metoposauroidea Davidow-Henry, B. (1989). Small Metoposaurid Amphibians from the Triassic of Western North America and their Significance. In: Dawn of the Age of Dinosaurs in the American Southwest. Lucas, S.G. and A.P. Hunt (eds.) New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science. Sulej, T. (2007). Osteology, Variability and Evolution of Metoposaurus, a Temnospondyl from the Late Triassic of Poland. Palaeontologia Polonica, 64. Sulej, T. (2002). Species discrimination of the Late Triassic temnospondyl amphibian Metoposaurus diagnosticus. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, 47(3). Superfamiily Plagiosauroidea Dias-da-Silva, S. and A.R. Milner (2010). The pustulated temnospondyl revisited - a plagiosternine plagiosaurid from the Lower Triassic of Brazil. Acta Paleontologica Polonica, 55(3). Warren, A. (1998). Laidleria uncovered: A rediscription of Laidleria gracilis Kitching (1957), a temnospondyl from the Cynognathus Zone of South Africa. Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society, 122. Superfamily Rhytidosteoidea Cosgriff, J.W. and J.M. Zawiskie (1979). A New Species of the Rhytidosteidae from the Lystrosaurus Zone and a Review of the Rhytidosteoidea. Palaeont.afr., 22. Dias-da-Silva, S., C. Marsicano and C.L. Schultz (2006). Rhytidosteid Temnospondyls in Gondwana: A New Taxon from the Lower Triassic of Brazil. Palaeontology, Vol.49, Part 2. Shishkin, M.A. (1994). A Gondwanan Rhytidosteid (Amphibia, Temnospondyli) from the Lower Triassic of Cisuralia. Paleontological Journal, 28(4). Superfamily Trematosauroida Damiani, R.J. and A.M. Yates (2003). The Triassic Amphibian Thoosuchus yakovlevi and the Relationships of the Trematosauroidea (Temnospondyli: Stereospondyli). Records of the Australian Museum, Vol.55. Schoch, R.R., A.R. Milner and H. Hellrung (2002). The last trematosaurid amphibian Hyperokynodon keuperinus revisited. Stuttgarter Beitr.Naturk., Ser.B, Number 321. General Temnospondyli Colbert, E.H. and J.W. Cosgriff (1974). Labyrinthodont Amphibians from Antarctica. American Museum Novitates, Number 2552. Damiani, R.J. and B.S. Rubidge (2003). A review of the South African temnospondyl amphibian record. Palaeont.afr., 39. Dias-Da-Silva, S. and C.L. Schultz (2008). Early Triassic Postcranial Temnospondyl Remains from Southern Brazil (Sango Da Cabral Formation, Parana Basin). Rev.bras.paleontol., 11(1). Dias-Da-Silva, S., C. Marsicano and C.L. Schultz (2005). Early Triassic Temnospondyl Skull Fragments from Southern South America (Parana Basin, Brazil). Revi.bras.peoeontol., 8(2). Dilkes, D. (2016). Carpus and tarsus of Temnospondyli. Vertebrate Anatomy Morphology Palaeontology, 1(1). Efremov, I.A. (1932). On the Permo-Triassic labyrinthodonts from the U.S.S.R. I. The labyrinthodonts of the Campylian beds of the Great Bogdo Mountain. Travaux de I'Institut Paleozoologique de l'Academie des Sciences de l'URSS, Vol.1. Frӧbisch, N.B., C. Bickelmann and F. Witzmann (2014). Early evolution of limb regeneration in tetrapods: evidence from a 300-million-year-old amphibian. Proc.R.Soc. B, 281. Li, J.-L. and Z.-W. Cheng (1999). New Anthracosaur and Temnospondyl Amphibians from Gansu, China - The Fifth Report on Late Permian Dashankou Lower Tetrapod Fauna. Vertebrata PalAsiatica, 37(3). Lucas, S.G., T. Kolar-Jurkovšek and B. Kolar-Jurkovšek (2008). First Record of a Fossil Amphibian in Slovenia (Lower Triassic, Olenekian). Revista Italiana di Paleontologia e Stratigrafia, Vol.114, Number 2, Short Note. Marsicano, C.A., J.A. Wilson and R.M.H. Smith (2014). A Temnospondyl Trackway from the Early Mesozoic of Western Gondwana and Its Implications for Basal Tetrapod Locomotion. PLoS ONE, 9(8). McHugh, J.B. (2012). Temnospondyl ontogeny and phylogeny, a window into terrestrial ecosystems during the Permian-Triassic mass extinction. Ph.D. Thesis - The University of Iowa. Pawley, K. (2006). The Postcranial Skeleton of Temnospondyls (Tetrapoda: Temnospondyli). Ph.D. thesis - La Trobe University, Melbourne. Piñeiro, G., et al. (2007). Temnospondyl Diversity of the Permian-Triassic Colonia Orozco Local Fauna (Buena Vista Formation) of Uruguay. Rev.bras.paleontol., 10(3). Ramos, B.D. and C.S. Vega (2011). Temnospondyl Remains from the Late Permian Rio Do Rasto Formation (Parana Basin) of Brazil. Rev.bras.paleontol., 14(1). Rinehart, L.F. and S.G. Lucas (2013). Tooth Form and Function in Temnospondyl Amphibians: Relationship of Shape to Applied Stress. In: The Triassic System. Tanner, L.H., J.A. Spielmann and S.G. Lucas (eds.), New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science Bulletin 61. Ruta, M., et al. (2007). A supertree of Temnospondyli: cladogenetic patterns in the most species-rich group of early tetrapods. Proc.R.Soc.B., 274. Schoch, R.R. and N.B. Frobisch (2006). Metamorphosis and Neoteny: Alternative Pathways in an Extinct Amphibian Clade. Evolution, 60(7). Sengupta, D.P. and P. Ghosh (1993). Morphometrics of Some Triassic Temnospondyls. In: The Nonmarine Triassic. Lucas, S.G. and M. Morales (eds.), New Mexico Museum of Natural History & Science, Bulletin Number 3. Shishkin, M.A. and T. Sulej (2009). Early Triassic Temnospondyls of the Czatkowice I Tetrapod Assemblage. Palaeontologica Polonica, 65. Skutschas, P.P., T. Martin and S. Ge (2009). The Co-Occurrence of Non-Lissamphibian Temnospondyls and Salamanders in the Late Jurassic of the Southern Junggar Basin (Xinjiang Autonomous Region, NW China). Proceedings of the Zoological Institute RAS, Vol.313, Number 2. Steyer, J.-S. (2000). Ontogeny and phylogeny in temnospondyls: a new method of analysis. Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society, 139. von Heune, F. (1958). The First Chinese Labyrinthodonts. Vertebrata PalAsiatica, 2(3).
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