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Found 23 results

  1. Discovered fossil tracks determined to be oldest known in Grand Canyon National Park ABC, Channel 15 News, Arizona The open access paper is: Rowland, S.M., Caputo, M.V., and Jensen, Z.A., 2020. Early adaptation to eolian sand dunes by basal amniotes is documented in two Pennsylvanian Grand Canyon trackways. PLoS ONE 15(8): e0237636. A related paper is: Francischini, H., Lucas, S.G., Voigt, S., Marchetti, L., Santucci, V.L., Knight, C.L., Wood, J.R., Dentzien-Dias, P. and Schultz, C.L., 2020. On the ;
  2. Nimravis

    Auction

    Well I decided to take some time off of painting the house and drove 45 miles to an auction. This auction goes on about 5 times a year and has Native American artifacts, military items, old fishing gear and yes, fossils. The majority of the fossils are fake Moroccan, but sometimes they have other things- today they have a large slab of trackways from the Coconino Sandstone that I am interested in, but it is so far down the list, I do not think I can wait. Here are some pics of The offerings- most of the flats will sell for about $50.00. Trackway Slab- standa
  3. Hi there! Wanted to share links to a mini documentary series created recently by Will Beckett. The series showcases sites, such as Belfast and Point Prim, on PEI that result in spectacular finds, some made very recently, that put this tiny Canadian province on the map. (WARNING: these links take you outside the forums to the external website YouTube) Cheers! - Keenan Episode 1 - An Introduction Episode 2 - The First Islander Episode 3 - Footprints in the Sandstone
  4. Early- and Mid-Cretaceous Archosaur Localities of North-Central Texas. Guidebook for the field trip held October 13, 2015 in conjunction with the 75th Annual Meeting of the Society of Vertebrate Paleontology in Dallas, Texas https://www.researchgate.net/publication/283711331_Early-_and_Mid-Cretaceous_Archosaur_Localities_of_North_Central_Texas https://figshare.com/articles/Early_and_Mid_Cretaceous_Archosaur_Localities_of_North_Central_Texas/1608173 http://chrisnoto.com/publications.html Yours, Paul H.
  5. These Are the Oldest Known Footprints on the Planet By George Dvorsky, Gizmodo, June 7, 2018 https://gizmodo.com/these-are-the-oldest-known-footprints-on-the-planet-1826648702 When did animals leave their first footprint on Earth? Chinese Academy of Sciences, June 6, 2018, Press Release https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2018-06/caos-wda060518.php The paper is: Zhe Chen, Xiang Chen, Chuanming Zhou, Xunlai Yuan, and Shuhai Xiao, 2018, Late Ediacaran trackways produced by bilaterian animals with paired appendages Science Advances
  6. LIDAR based characterization technology has helped analyze the first Dinosaur Trackways in the State of Arkansas better than just producing rice and soybeans http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0190527
  7. redleaf101

    Sussex Field Work (2015)

    Sussex is an interesting region in terms of geology and paleobiology. An amalgamation of different formations crisscrossing the larger Moncton Basin, this area was the target of study by local and foreign interests. Sussex is known for its potash mines, but one shouldn't forget the importance of the rich fossil localities doting the region. One such discovery was probably evidence of Canada's oldest forest, which is of significance. Matt Stimson, along with other professionals in the field, did some work in the area. I've had the chance to assist on occasion in a few field trips. The work don
  8. Roach, N. T., K. G. Hatala, K. R. Ostrofsky, B. Villmoare, J. S. Reeves, Andrew Du, D. R. Braun, J. W. K. Harris, A. K. Behrensmeyer, and B. G. Richmond, 2016, Pleistocene footprints show intensive use of lake margin habitats by Homo erectus groups. Scientific Reports 6, Article number: 26374 (2016) doi:10.1038/srep26374 http://www.nature.com/articles/srep26374 https://www.researchgate.net/publication/303372868_Pleistocene_footprints_show_intensive_use_of_lake_margin_habitats_by_Homo_erectus_groups https://repository.si.edu/handle/10088/28928 http://nrs.
  9. Just something for the group, I was just wondering if any one else would like to see a category dedicated to Trace Fossils? I like looking up info and seeing pictures on different Trace Fossils and find myself opening various topics and really finding what I am looking for. I think it could be something as simple as adding it to the "Collections" section with a category titled "Trace Fossils", and that could include sub-categories for trackways, coprolites, burrows, predation evidence, ripple marks / rain drops, trails, etc., or just lump it all under Trace Fossils. If not in the C
  10. Found this slab near Ithaca, New York in the Devonian Hamilton formation. The underside shows a lot of medium sized lines and gouges, which i interpret to be tracks. Am I wrong? Surrounding rocks were not very fossil-rich. Thanks for any help identifying these!
  11. October of 2014 saw a few storms that rocked the coast of Joggins pretty good. In sites like these, the day(s) after a storm is the best day to see if nature revealed more of its secrets. I invited my friend Ray to come down South to Nova Scotia with me for a little trip and boom, on the road with good company! For people that don't know what or where Joggins is by now (look up my previous posts or just search for it on the 'InTeRnEtS' via a search engine), you'll find out that this UNESCO site plays a crucial part in trying to understand our past, before the domination of giant diapsids, a
  12. Tiny Carboniferous Steps by Brian Switek Wired News, September 6, 2012 http://www.wired.com...niferous-steps/ the paper is: Stimson, M., S. G. Lucas, and G. Melanson, 2012, The Smallest Known Tetrapod Footprints: Batrachichnus salamandroides from the Carboniferous of Joggins, Nova Scotia, Canada, Ichnos: An International Journal for Plant and Animal Traces, vol. 19, no. 3, pp. 127-140. http://www.tandfonli...940.2012.685206 http://www.tandfonli...=gich20#preview Best wishes, Paul H.
  13. redleaf101

    Tynemouth Creek (Gardner Creek)

    Taken from my blog post: http://redleafz.blogspot.ca/2013/08/tynemouth-creek-gardner-creek.html I've been tallying up a list of new sites I wanted to visit and Tynemouth Creek was on the top of that list. The Tynemouth Creek coastlines, located in Southern New Brunswick between Saint Martins and Saint John, has been the site of newly discovered trackways which had been few before. The formations of this site are about Lower Pennsylvanian (Carboniferous) in age, with the occasional sliver of Pre-Cambrian rock crossing some of the local rock, and Triassic sections further East towards St. Mar
  14. Here's the link to the original blog post: http://redleafz.blogspot.ca/2013/04/somewhere-in-parrsboro-there-are.html A few days ago I drew a map of the West Bay/Cape Sharp area South-West of the town of Parrsboro, Nova Scotia. I had wanted to check the Jurassic age basalt cliffs of Cape Sharp and poke around a bit to see if I could come out with anything. On the cliffs on each side of Cape Sharp are Carboniferous sandstone cliffs which displays a fascinating record of trackways, especially those of tetrapods. I had marked on my makeshift map where the location of a possible access point to th
  15. Continued from Part 2... First set of tracks located on the far right of the slab Second set of tracks Close up featuring some tracks from the second set Multiple sets located near the middle of the trackway slab Transition zone showing activity Toolmarks Toolmarks Toolmarks from left edge of trackway slab Side view with top pointing West Rain drops(?) Closeup of smaller set of tracks Backdrop shows cliff that the trackways o
  16. Continued from Part 1 More tracks, and these are very nice. The sandstone shows different other textures and features. These dozen footprints or so seem to be indicating that the animal was walking from right to left, and at one point undecidedly turning left. Possible body drag, but I'm not familiar with these yet to fully recognize them. General direction of animal's trajectory Close up Another set of beautifully detailed footprints. These could be seen at a good distance. There's about 16, possibly 17, footprints that can be seen. The sands
  17. Continued from Part 1 These sandstone cliffs show remarkable details. The right section of the picture above show ripples close together, and the left section show what looks like dried up mud. For me this looks like what could have been a body that had dried up either in a warm and dry climate or a body of water where its water level was getting low. You will sometime find trace fossils on these features, as we did that day. Ken inspecting some trace fossils Fist sized animal foot prints (middle in an 'S' shape) We almost ran by these as we d
  18. [Taken from my blog July 2011 - http://redleafz.blogspot.ca] This afternoon I was able to attend another curatorial walk organized by the Fundy Geological Museum (FGM)about the geological features of Partridge Island, which is about a 15 minutes drive from Parrsboro. We left the FGM at about 1pm and arrived at the beach not long after. The tides were just starting to get low so Ken Adams (the interpretor and FGM's curator) took the time to explain the various geological puzzle pieces that make up this area. With our group was a woman that took video and audio of this tour to include in a bid
  19. [Taken from my blog August 2011: http://redleafz.blogspot.ca] I've been looking for this little trip for quite a long time, since last year actually. When I was doing some digging up about important geological sites related to fossils, and Diligent River was on top of my list. The area has be known to have a good record of trace fossils (ichnofossils) of animals that roam the area in the Carboniferous Period (between 320 and 280 million years ago) when this was a wet swampy forest. The other reason for me to go fossil hunting in that spot is ferns.. ferns ferns ferns. I was gonna go on my ow
  20. Continued from Part 1 Part 2 is the culmination of our efforts and attempt to extract the chosen trackways on the following Sunday, that also saw us go back the morning after. We had planned on the to do's and hows' for the day, but as I quickly found out, you basically make decisions on the go once you're there. We also made sure to bring all the equipment needed for our field trip, including some plaster to create a cast if we're unable to extract the trackways. We arrived on site very early in the morning. Matt had thought that we would probably be done sometime in the afternoon, but that
  21. A while back I had posted that I had partaken in a field trip in Southern New Brunswick. Me and my buddy Craig had planned to go on a trip to Parrsboro (Friday, September 9th 2011). That morning I had received an email from my friend Matt about going on a field trip in the Cape Enrage area to investigate the cliffs over there. If we decided to go, I would have the chance to meet Dr. Randall Miller, the current curator of the New Brunswick Museum. We agreed to modify our plans and contacted Matt. After picking up Matt and some morning grub, we proceeded South towards Fundy. Our destinat
  22. Continued from Part 1 Other things we would find on the beach beside trackways are actual parts of the animals such as scales, teeth, and bones. Slab containing various bone fragments More bone fragments, scales This piece of sandstone shows an interesting feature. The recess shows a 'U' shape obstruction. This could have contributed by a change in water movement. This could be interpreted, possibly, as water movement such as a tide, and not simply as wave action. That's what comes to mind so far. Same thing I said before, I'll leave that to actual experts.
  23. [taken from my blog: http://redleafz.blogspot.ca] Rock Hunting All Over Nova Scotia's Fundy Coast (April 2012) It's early in the year to go rock hunting, but the weather had been favorable for the past few days. I had the idea of going for a road trip in Nova Scotia to check a few sites. My friend Matt Stimson was interested to tag along and was in Halifax for the weekend. I had offered to go pick him up in town and from there we could plan what sites to visit. The weather for that day (Saturday April 7th, 2012) had changed and they were predicting heavy snow falls late in the evening. We we
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