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Found 7 results

  1. T. peramplum #2

    From the album Fauna and Flora of the Austin Group in Texas

    This Tridenticeras peramplum specimen is 2.9 cm in height, and 1.9 cm in diameter. It shows the typical three rows of tubercles on each oblique rib, except on the most mature, bottom whorl. What I can tell from my references is that this is because only the phragmocone has tubercles, and thus the bottom whorl is the living chamber.
  2. T. peramplum #1

    From the album Fauna and Flora of the Austin Group in Texas

    This specimen is the largest of its genus in my collection, and the largest known to me in any collection. It measures about 7 cm in height, and 4.3 cm in diameter. It retains its tubercles in the most mature whorl sections that are preserved well enough to tell. The specimen is quite crushed.
  3. T. peramplum #1

    From the album Fauna and Flora of the Austin Group in Texas

    This specimen is the largest of its genus in my collection, and the largest known to me in any collection. It measures about 7 cm in height, and 4.3 cm in diameter. It retains its tubercles in the most mature whorl sections that are preserved well enough to tell.
  4. At a site where I have been finding heteromorphs, I have recently come across some vertebrate material. So far I have only found three vertebrate specimens; one bone fragment and two fish scales. I am hoping to get some information on their affinities. I am most interested in the fish scales, since it seems they would be the most easily identified. The site is in North Texas, the Austin Chalk group, Atco formation, upper Coniacian stage. For biostratigraphic reference, at this same site I have also found the ammonites Protexanites planatus, Phlycticrioceras trinodosum, Tridenticeras peramplum, Scaphites semicostatus, and Glyptoxoceras sp., among others. The bone (Figs 1-17) was found on Saturday the 14th of July. It is a small fragment from a more marly layer than the fish scales and most of the rare ammonites that I am finding are from, but still from the same site. The main part of it has 39 mm exposed length wise as shown in Figs 11-12 (some of it is still buried in the rock), and has a branch coming from the main part that is 22 mm long that forms a depressed canal structure in the rock (Fig. 14). The maximum thickness of the specimen that I can see is about 2 ½ mm. The branch begins to curve around when it meets the main part of the bone. The other end of the rock and the underside don't show much exposure of the bone except for a few bits poking through (Figs 16-17). I don’t know if the specimen came from a fish or some other vertebrate, but I would guess fish. If anyone can give more information on what kind of animal this came from and where this might have been located in the animal’s skeleton, that would be much appreciated. But I also know that due to its very fragmentary nature, a more definite identification may not be possible. The two fish scales (Figs 18-20) were both found on Friday the 27th of July over 100 yards from where the bone was found. These specimens are from a more chalky matrix than the bone, the same matrix that the rare ammonites are in. The first specimen (Figs 18-19) was found breaking open a large chunk of chalk. It is basically flawless and in excellent condition, and only has a little bit of obscuring matrix on the right side that could be prepped off. In the same chunk of rock that I cracked open to find this I also found a T. peramplum specimen. The fish scale is 5 ½ mm long by 5 ½ mm wide. The second fish scale I found (Fig. 20) was found within a few feet of the first one, possibly from the same fish specimen. It is a bit beat up and less complete than the first scale, but is larger from what I can see. It is 7 mm wide including the flatended area upon which the scale once was before it flaked away during excavation. The front part of it is still buried in the rock but could hopefully be prepped out. It is also in a chalky chunk of rock, not marly. I have noticed that these are less shiny than scales preserved in shales, though they still do glimmer a bit in direct light. They are also differently colored than most fish scales preserved in shales, with mine being on the red/brown spectrum while those in shale are usually black or dark gray. I am hoping that the distinctive symmetrical 7 way splitting shown on the first fish scale could narrow down the identification. I know that getting to the species or genus level could be very difficult, but could a family or order be at least possible? I have heard that identifying fish scales is challenging, but this paper indicates that it is not impossible. @oilshale, you’re a fishy guy (in a good way of course). Any ideas? Fig. 1.
  5. A Murder of Tridenticeras

    On Friday my mother and I went to the same rock pile where she found this as of yet unidentified heteromorph ammonite exactly 5 weeks prior. We had been there multiple times since she found it but every trip was a bust because we had surface picked it as much as we could the first time. But within the last few days the pile had been turned up again when part of it was used to level a flat surface to pour a driveway. Because this site is so rich in rare heteromorphs I decided that it would be wise to hunt around it again. It had indeed been rejuvenated and the hunt was an hour well spent! We had only been there a minute or two when I found my first Tridenticeras peramplum ammonite of the day. It was laying amongst the rocks used to level the ground a few feet away from the pile. It is only an external impression but very detailed. The ribs and tubercles are well defined all over the preserved specimen even on the tiny uppermost whorl as clearly shown in P1 - P3. This is the 9th T. peramplum specimen in my collection and the 2nd impression only specimen. It is also the second impression to preserve one of the whorls closest to the apex. It is in association with an inoceramid just above it. FIG 1 - FIG 6, Specimen 1: Total shell height is 29mm, total shell diameter is 15mm. Ruler is in millimeters. FIG 1: T. peramplum is trituberculate with the bottom two tubercles being closer together. FIG 2: FIG 3: This picture shows especially clearly the detail on the uppermost whorl. FIG 4: FIG 5: FIG 6: Continued in next post...
  6. I have a Tridenticeras peramplum ammonite steinkern from the Austin Chalk that has part of it incrusted with algae/moss from sitting in a small creek where I found it. What would be recommended to clean moss off of chalk fossils, not just ammonites? What ever the method that is recommended I would first try it out on a fossil-less chunk of chalk to make sure that the process wouldn’t be detrimental to the matrix. I also don’t want to scratch the fossil by scrubbing it with something overly abrasive since the matrix weakens when wet. I usually use a soft bristled toothbrush for cleaning dirt off of specimens. Would that enough? Thanks in advance!
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