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Found 15 results

  1. T. proriger tooth texture

    From the album North Sulfur River

    This is an edited image (negative) that shows more of the texture of the tylosaurus tooth.
  2. Tylosaurus Tooth

    From the album North Sulfur River

    Bottom view of the tooth (showing that it still could use some cleaning).
  3. Tylosaurus Tooth

    From the album North Sulfur River

    Lateral view showing enamel gloss (note finger reflection) and chipping along edge. The enamel also shows a strange orange coloration.
  4. NSR Tylosaurus tooth discovery

    From the album North Sulfur River

    T. Proriger tooth.
  5. Tylosaurus Proriger Tooth

    From the album North Sulfur River

    T. Proriger tooth. Enamel is almost entirely intact, with the exception of the tip which has been worn away by weathering, feeding, or a combination thereof.
  6. Baby tylosaurine skull from Kansas

    Hey everyone I just got news of a recently described set of juvenile Tylosaurus cranial remains! This cranial material is from the Santonian Smoky Hill Chalk Member (part of the Niobrara Fm.) of western Kansas. What's really exciting is that this specimen (FHSM VP-14845) originated from a neonate (newborn) individual, which can reveal numerous details about mosasaur growth and ontogeny. I've attached the paper below: Konishi, T., P. Jimenez-Huidobro, and M. W. Caldwell. 2018. The smallest-known neonate individual of Tylosaurus (Mosasauridae, Tylosaurinae) sheds new light on the tylosaurine rostrum and heterochrony. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. DOI: 10.1080/02724634.2018.1510835. Abstract: We here report on the smallest-known, neonate-sized Tylosaurus specimen, FHSM VP-14845, recovered from the lower Santonian portion of the Niobrara Chalk exposed in Kansas, U.S.A. Lacking any associated adult-sized material, FHSM VP-14845 comprises fragmentary and associated cranial bones, here considered to represent a single neo- natal individual with an estimated skull length of 30 cm. Despite its small size, a suite of cranial characters diagnoses FHSM VP-14845 as a species of Tylosaurus, including the elongate basisphenoid morphology. At the same time, FHSM VP-14845 unexpectedly lacks a conical predental rostrum on the premaxilla, generally regarded as diagnostic of this genus. Further, the first and the second premaxillary teeth are closely spaced, with the second set positioned posterolateral to the first, contributing to the overall shortness of the dentigerous premaxilla. Because a conical predental rostrum is already present in ontogenetically young specimens of T. nepaeolicus and T. proriger with respective skull lengths of approxi- mately 40 and 60 cm, formation of such a rostrum must have taken place very early in postnatal ontogeny. Our recognition of a neonate-sized Tylosaurus specimen without an elongate predental rostrum of the premaxilla suggests hypermorphosis as a likely heterochronic process behind the evolution of this iconic tylosaurine feature. Partial pterygoids of the newborn Tylosaurus. Taken from fig. 4 of Konishi et al. (2018) Here's the paper - hope you'll enjoy it! Juvenile tylosaur skull.pdf -Christian
  7. Hi everyone, With this thread I wanted to start a discussion about what the feeding habits would be for most mosasaur species, how you think they would have fed. I personally love mosasaurs, they are one of my favorite prehistoric animals for a number of reasons and I’ve recently even bought my first Prognathodon jaw and I also live in an area that is not only known for their fossils but also for the discovery of mosasaurs. I’ve been doing a bit of reading lately about mosasaurs but I can’t really find anything difinitive on their feeding habits. Their diet yes. But exactly how they consumed their prey, not yet. I personally work with reptiles on a daily base, both with my job and with my hobby and I know quite a bit of different feeding behaviours with these animals. And as I was feeding the ball pythons (Python regius) at work I was kinda wondering, how would a large marine reptile like a mosasaurus eat? Would they just tear off chunks of meat like their closest living relatives the monitor lizards? Or would they perform deathroll like crocodiles do to tear of chunks of meat of their prey? Or when we talk about smaller prey, would they just swallow them whole like a snake does with it’s two lower jaws that can move independently, would a mosasaur be capable of that? Or would it be a mix of all those things or something entirely different? So I was just wondering what are your thoughts on the subject? I love to hear your theories and own finds and observations or if anyone ever read something in a scientific paper about the matter. I am dying to know your thoughts on the matter, as I want to learn as much as I can about these magnificent beasts!
  8. New Tylosaurus

    I thought the mosasaur fans here might enjoy a fairly recent bit of mosa-research… This paper describes the very well preserved skull and associated postcrania (a few vertebrae, some pectoral and pelvic girdle elements, a partial forelimb and a hindlimb) of a new tylosaurine mosasaur species, Tylosaurus saskatchewanensis. The holotype material of this tylosaur is from the Upper Campanian (Late Cretaceous) Bearpaw Formation of Saskatchewan, Canada. The paper: Jiménez-Huidobro et al. 2018 new Tylosaurus species.pdf A sneak peak at some of the material described (articulated dorsal vertebrae) - scale bar is 10cm: Hope you guys like it
  9. I saw the first opportunity to get back to the North Sulphur River yesterday when the temps were going to be below normal for a change. There was a really nice breeze blowing down the river. Went to a spot on the river that I have only been to once before and access is pretty poor. Thanks to whomever added the rope, it helped, especially getting out! Quantity of the finds were low but the quality of what I found was great. Found the largest Tylosaurus tooth I have ever found with a diameter just under an inch. Also a shark tooth and one nice mosasaur vertebrae. I always enjoy the chance to find an artifact, ever though they are rare, or at least for me they are? I liked the way that JarrodB displayed his artifact recently, so I photographed this one the same and it turned out pretty good. Not sure the type, could be a Marshall, usually I find Gary's, so this was a nice departure. I will be watching for another cooler than normal Texas summer day to get back to this spot.
  10. Tylosaurus proriger tooth

    From the album Reptiles

    Tylosaurus proriger Found in the North Sulphur River, Ozan Formation Dated Campanian Stage of Cretaceous (≈80 mya) Measures 4.4 cm (1.7 inches)
  11. three vertebrae in question

    Good evening, I have acquired these three vertebrae from a creek in Travis county where I regularly find shark teeth and echinoids. I have my suspicions on what they might be but would like a definite ID, thanks. Disregard the background ha
  12. Texas Pliosaur and Mosasaur teeth

    So I've gotten myself into an extremely rare deal- a mosasaur and pliosaur tooth both in the US for a small fee of 130 bucks or so (95 british pound) The goodies arrived today, and I might as well show em off. First off, we have a mosasaur tooth from the Ozan Formation of Fannin County. Knowing that the NSR flows inside Fannin County and is also part of the Ozan Formation, This tooth is probably also from the NSR itself. Although the seller didn't have time to do a full ID on the tooth and simply labeled it as unidentified, by extensive comparing with other mosasaur teeth from the area, I can promptly assume that this is cf. Tylosaurus proriger, meaning that after 11+ years of my life, I finally have a T. proriger tooth . Unless someone decides to be a donkey and counterID it. Next, we got a tooth that has been sought out for by countless collectors- a north american pliosaur tooth. As with other Texan pliosaur teeth, this one was from the Britton Formation near Dallas. Again, the seller labeled it as an unidentified pliosaur. This time though, IDing is difficult. Based on my knowledge, the two possible candidates are Brachauchenius lucasi and Polyptychodon hudsoni, which both have been found in this area. But as its hard to tell the difference between the two in teeth, I can't make a solid pinpoint. Maybe I'll just be biased and label it as cf. Brachauchenius lucasi because brachs are more iconic to me and due to the unstableness of the polyptychodon taxon. Although not as large as other's tylosaurus teeth, this one still kicks over 4 cm which is still pretty big to me. The pliosaur tooth is just over 2 cm, making it quite small but worth due to its rarity.
  13. Black Hills Institute Museum

    So I went to the Black Hills Insitute and I made a lot of photos, so I thought I'd share. The Black Hills Institute museum in Hill City is pretty small, it's just one hall. But this one hall is absolutely packed with stuff. This is also the home of the T. rex Stan. Many of the skeletons are casts, but there are plenty of real fossils here as well. The skeleton of Stan. This is the real skeleton and the real skull is placed beside it in the corner. But I didn't even notice that at the time. Skull of Torosaurus. Notice the holes in the frill. Triceratops doesn't have these holes in it's frill. Tylosaurus proriger. Another real specimen. Two Allosaurus skeletons. An Ornithomimid as well as Stan, the Senckenberg Edmontosaurus mummy and Tarbosaurus skull in the background. Skeleton of Albertosaurus, skull of Albertosaurus on the left and skull of Gorgosaurus on the right. A second T. rex skeleton. And a lineup of T. rex skulls in the background. Thescelosaurus and Pachycephalosaurus. Juvenile Edmontosaurus skeleton below the second T. rex skeleton. Cast of the Triceratops Raymond. Crestless Pteranodon on the left as well as a Nyctosaurus? arm/wing at the bottom. Dromaeosaurus in the middle between the legs of the Triceratops and a primitive Sirenian with legs on the right. Bambiraptor and Archaeopteryx skeletons. Foot and skull of Deinonychus and Herrerasaurus, Dromaeosaurus and Eoraptor skulls at the bottom. T. rex arm (cast of Sue) and brian endocast left. Nanotyrannus skull on the right. Mongolian Dinosaurs. Saichania and Saurolophus skulls at the top. Velociraptor skull and oviraptorid partial skeletons below that. Prenocephale, Oviraptor, Archaeornithimimus and Alioramus at the bottom. Tethyshadros top left, and Psittacosaurus nest, and skeletons on the bottom left. Brontosaurus leg in the middle and baby Apatosaurus on the right. Velociraptor and Protoceratops fighting on the far right. Edaphosaurus skeleton. And this is just a small selection of the photos I took. There's just so much stuff here and I only spent a few hours here. The gift shop is also worth a vist btw. I bought a rather nice replica of a tooth from Stan and a Thescelosaurus phalange.
  14. Mosasaur Humerus?

    Hi everyone. I recently bought this Mosasaur fossil that was labeled as a Tylosaurus Humerus, and i just wanted to check if this is indeed a humerus or another part of a mosasaur because looking at some pictures on the internet of mosasaurs (and Tylosaurs) it could also be a radius. It is 5 and a half inches in length and was collected in the Niobrara Formation in the Smoky Hill Chalk (Kansas). Since i am not an expert on mosasaurs (i am still learning about them) and my knowledge is limited, i was hoping someone who knows about mosasaurs could help out in confirming if this does belong to a Tylosaurus and if it is a humerus or a different part. I do trust the seller i just thought it would be worth posting on the forum to see what others think. Any help would be greatly appreciated.
  15. Hi all, I have a set of three lovely reptilian teeth from Barbour and Russell Counties of Alabama that I need help identifying. First up, the large mosasaur tooth. The size and general shape of this points to Tylosaurus, Second, the smaller mosasaur tooth. The size and shape points either to Platecarpus or Clidastes propython. I can't decide. Third, the croc. As far as I know, Deinosuchus and Bottosaurus are the only crocs from this area. The tooth looks like Bottosaurus to me. I'm unfamiliar with teeth from this locality, so I'd appreciate any help in getting them identified.
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