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Found 35 results

  1. Rainy hunt in Portishead UK

    Hi everyone! Today, a friend of mine from the Paleontology course at the University of Bristol and I went fossil hunting at the beach of Portishead, as we had heard it was an interesting and productive location. We were fairly confident that we would come home with at least some crinoid pieces, as these were meant to be rather abundant, but our real goal was to hopefully find some of the elusive eurypterid remains. It was about half an hour bus ride from the center of Bristol to Portishead, so it's relatively quick and easy for us to get there. It didn't take too long for us find our first few crinoid pieces in the rubble on the beach, and my friend managed to find a couple of decent spiriferid brachiopods by splitting some small rocks open. Unfortunately, it started to rain quite quickly, and after about an hour of searching the rain we decided to call it a day... so we didn't hunt for very long at all and hence didn't make any impressive finds. We didn't see any traces of fishes or eurypterids either which was a little disappointing, although also somewhat expected. Wishing to escape the rain, we found a little restaurant where we could sit inside and get a warm lunch, and afterwards we decided to just go back home as we were both tired, despite the very short hunt. So in terms of finds, we weren't very successful, but I did manage to snap some nice photos from the location. The geology of the place was really crazy and kind of all over the place, as you can see from the pictures here. Really interesting! We haven't yet covered this topic in my Geology course, but I suspect we will do that sometime soon, and then I will probably be more knowledgeable about what we're seeing actually means. But for now you'll still have to stick with my very amateur descriptions (stratigraphy can be a little complicated for a Pleistocene hunter as myself! ) This is the northern end of the location, Battery Point, where we are looking at several layers of the Portishead Formation. This is a Tournaisian-aged (Mississipian, early Carboniferous, approx 350 million years old) formation that is very rich in crinoids and corals. What's interesting to note is that the layers are not straight, but sit at approximately 30 degrees upwards. But that's pretty mild compared to the Devonian layers (as you will see a bit later). (Continued)
  2. ID if possible please

    Hi everyone New here and have a 5yr old VERY interested in fossils. Found the attached on a local beach earlier today, North West - United Kingdom. Usually renowned for ammonites. Not sure if just pretty pattern or a fossil imprint. Any ideas or suggestions would be very much appreciated. The stone is approx 70mm but can get another photo with exact measurements later if that would help?
  3. UK Shark Tooth

    Hi everyone, I have here a shark tooth from the United Kingdom Eocene. It wasn't given to me with much more information. It's around 8mm and unserrated. Is it possible to narrow down a species?
  4. Everyone probably knows the theropod distal femur from the Taynton Limestone Formation of Oxfordshire that was illustrated by Robert Plot in 1677 and thought to be from a Roman war elephant or biblical giant, and which was dubbed " humanum"* by Richard Brookes in 1763. However, even though the femur illustrated by Plot (now missing) has often been considered to belong to Megalosaurus, but as noted in Halstead and Sarjeant (1993), this femur might belong to a theropod other than Megalosaurus, as Duriavenator, Magnosaurus, Iliosuchus, and Cruxicheiros co-existed lived in the same time and region as Megalosaurus. *" humanum" was not a binomial, but instead an anatomical label; see Halstead and Sarjeant (1993). Halstead, L. B.; Sarjeant, W. A. S. (1993). humanum Brookes - the earliest name for a dinosaur. Modern Geology 18: 221–224.
  5. A new ichthyosaur-related paper is available online: Nikolay G Zverkov and Megan L Jacobs. 2020. Revision of Nannopterygius (Ichthyosauria: Ophthalmosauridae): reappraisal of the ‘Inaccessible’ holotype resolves a taxonomic tangle and reveals an obscure ophthalmosaurid lineage with a wide distribution. Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society zlaa028. DOI: 10.1093/zoolinnean/zlaa028 The description of Nannopterygius borealis from the Arctic circle and the synonymization of the Kimmeridgian-Tithonian genera Paraophthalmosaurus and Yasykovia with Nannopterygius offers new insights into the genus Nannopterygius, as the holotype of N. enthekiodon was mounted in a location that made it inaccessible in some respects, and Paraophthalmosaurus and Yasykovia were until recently considered probable synonyms of Ophthalmosaurus. Like Arthropterygius, Nannopterygius was widespread in waters at high latitudes. By the way, could anyone send me a copy of the above-mentioned paper?
  6. UK Ichthyosaur or Pliosaur Tooth

    Hello, I recently got a hold of this tooth from an old collection in the UK. I am unsure if this tooth wouldve come from a ichthyosaur or a pliosaur since the root is absent and I'm not expert in this material, so any feedback that help figure this tooth out is appreciated.
  7. Fungal endophytes in a 400-million-yr-old land plant:infection pathways, spatial distribution, and host responses Michael Krings, Thomas N. Taylor, Hagen Hass, Hans Kerp, Nora Dotzler and Elizabeth J. Hermsen New Phytologist (2007) 174: 648–657 nothiafungalinfepatholkringstltaylnewphytolkerpdotzl37.2007.02008.x.pdf NB .:Chytridiomycota, Glomeromycota, Ascomycota, Peronosporomycetes are known from Rhynie
  8. It's iron,man

    The microbially driven formation of siderite in salt marsh sediments Chin Yik Lin, Alexandra V. Turchyn, Alexey Krylov, Gilad Antler Geobiology. 2020;18:207–224. gbi.12371.pdf
  9. British dinosaurs to feature on UK money for the first time By Josh Davis, Natural History Museum, February 2020 https://www.nhm.ac.uk/discover/news/2020/february/british-dinosaurs-to-feature-on-coins.html Yours, Paul H.
  10. A new thalattosuchian-related paper is available online: Michela M Johnson, Mark T Young, Stephen L Brusatte, 2019. Re-description of two contemporaneous mesorostrine teleosauroids (Crocodylomorpha: Thalattosuchia) from the Bathonian of England and insights into the early evolution of Machimosaurini, Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society, , zlz037, https://doi.org/10.1093/zoolinnean/zlz037 Steneosaurus recently began undergoing alpha-taxonomic revision after Steneosaurus obtusidens was renamed Lemmysuchus and placed as sister to Machimosaurus in Machimosaurini, but the recognition of Yvridiosuchus as a machimosaurin shows that machimosaurins diverged from other teleosaurids beginning in the Bathonian.
  11. Rockhound Finds Fossil Rhino Bone

    Pooch sniffs out prehistoric prize: Canine discovers 250,000-year-old woolly rhino bone By Today, Today news, April 5, 2019 https://www.todaychan.com/2019/04/05/pooch-sniffs-out-prehistoric-prize-dog-discovers-250000-year-old-woolly-rhino-bone-2/ Yours, Paul H.
  12. Death near the shoreline, not life on land December 13, 2018, Geological Society of America https://phys.org/news/2018-12-death-shoreline-life.html https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2018-12/gsoa-dnt121318.php Shillito, Anthony P. and Davies, Neil S. (2018) Death near the Shoreline, not Life on Land: Ordovician Arthropod Trackways in the Borrowdale Volcanic Group, UK. Geology. ISSN 0091-7613, 1943-2682 https://pubs.geoscienceworld.org/gsa/geology/article/47/1/55/567352/Death-near-the-shoreline-not-life-on-land GSA Data Repository 2019022 https://www.geosociety.org/datarepository/2019/2019022.pdf Yours, Paul H.
  13. Mesozoic moss animals

    pauldt Colony growth strategies, dormancy and repair in some Late Cretaceous encrusting bryozoans: insights into the ecology of the Chalk seabed Paul D. Taylor, & Emanuela Di Martino & Silviu O. Martha Palaeobiodiversity and Palaeoenvironments pp 1–22 First Online: 07 December 2018 size: about 18 MB Given the status of the first author: I wouldn't exactly say "MUST-read",but when you love the bryozoa(and let's face it ,who doesn't*?),and you have some spare time.. *useless asterisk Corrigendum/apology/whateffah*:The above is misleading in the sense that people might underestimate the awe in which I hold Paul Taylor. Certainly one of the great bryozoologist of this century post(=after everyboday has reacted)post
  14. Is this a fossil bone?

    Hello I was wondering if anyone could identify this fragment, which I think might be a fragment of bone, but am unsure. I don't have a lot of knowledge when it comes to identifying Pleistocene fossils.
  15. very old news

    LINK A Peach*:Monograph of the Higher Crustacea of the Carboniferous Rocks of Scotland memoirs of the Geological Survey of Great Britain/Paleontology Published : 1908 *EUHHH:unintentional pun? 5,12 Mb,or thereabouts Localities:Glencartholm,Granton "editorial note": Granton is a bit of a lagerstatt,but curiously enough I'm somehow hesitant about adding that to the tags
  16. How a poor Victorian woman became a legendary fossil hunter Mary Anning was renowned as a ‘geological lioness’, with her discoveries including the first complete plesiosaur fossil. Now, centuries later, her town of Lyme Regis is putting up a long overdue statue of her, The Independent, November 2018 https://www.independent.co.uk/news/science/mary-anning-fossils-palaeontology-lyme-regis-women-geology-statue-victorian-era-a8617936.html Yours, Paul H.
  17. Fossil collector rescued after becoming trapped by landslide Fishermen dig injured man out of mud before he is airlifted to safety The Independent, November 2018 https://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/home-news/fossil-collector-trapped-mud-landslide-cliffs-port-mulgrave-yorkshire-a8605461.html Yours, Paul H.
  18. LINK Sedimentary context and palaeoecology of Gigantoproductus shell beds in the Mississippian Eyam Limestone Formation, Derbyshire carbonate platform, central England L. S. P. Nolan1*, L. Angiolini2, F. Jadoul2, G. Della Porta2, S. J. Davies1, V. J. Banks3, M. H. Stephenson3 & M. J. Leng4,5 Proceedings of the Yorkshire Geological Society Published online July 25, 2017 https://doi.org/10.1144/pygs2017-393 | Vol. 61 | 2017 | pp. 239–257 ABOUT 12 MB,RECOMMENDED,not in the least for all those interested in the Carboniferous("Dinantian")of Europe and brachiopod ecology
  19. Quenstedtoceras Ammonite

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Quenstedtoceras Ammonite United Kingdom Jurassic Period (~112 Million Years Ago) Quenstedtoceras is a genus of ammonoid cephalopods that lived during the latter part of the Jurassic period in what is now France, Germany, and the United Kingdom. The shell of Quenstedtoceras is typically evolute and strongly ribbed, with all whorls visible. Widths vary according to the species from rather narrow to somewhat broad, as does ribbing. Ribs commonly start at the umbilical shoulder and extend laterally to about mid flank where they divide and curve forward toward the outer rim, or venter, and meet at a keel. Shells are of moderate size, commonly reaching diameters of about 6 cm (2.4 in). Quenstedtoceras, included in the superfamily Stephanocerataceae, now revised to Stephanoceratoidea, is first of the subfamily Cardioceratinae, derived from Cadoceras or related genus is the mid or late Callovian and gave rise at the end of its range in the early Oxfordian to Cardioceras. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Mollusca Class: Cephalopoda Order: †Ammonitida Family: †Cardioceratidae Subfamily: †Cardioceratinae Genus: †Quenstedtoceras
  20. Quenstedtoceras Ammonite

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Quenstedtoceras Ammonite United Kingdom Jurassic Period (~112 Million Years Ago) Quenstedtoceras is a genus of ammonoid cephalopods that lived during the latter part of the Jurassic period in what is now France, Germany, and the United Kingdom. The shell of Quenstedtoceras is typically evolute and strongly ribbed, with all whorls visible. Widths vary according to the species from rather narrow to somewhat broad, as does ribbing. Ribs commonly start at the umbilical shoulder and extend laterally to about mid flank where they divide and curve forward toward the outer rim, or venter, and meet at a keel. Shells are of moderate size, commonly reaching diameters of about 6 cm (2.4 in). Quenstedtoceras, included in the superfamily Stephanocerataceae, now revised to Stephanoceratoidea, is first of the subfamily Cardioceratinae, derived from Cadoceras or related genus is the mid or late Callovian and gave rise at the end of its range in the early Oxfordian to Cardioceras. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Mollusca Class: Cephalopoda Order: †Ammonitida Family: †Cardioceratidae Subfamily: †Cardioceratinae Genus: †Quenstedtoceras
  21. On the use and abuse of ancient DNA.

    On the use and abuse of ancient DNA. Researchers in several disciplines need to tread carefully over shared landscapes of the past. Ewen Callaway, Nature. March 18, 2018 https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-018-03773-6 Some related articles are: Editorial: On the use and abuse of ancient DNA. Researchers in several disciplines need to tread carefully over shared landscapes of the past. Nature 555, 559 (2018) https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-018-03857-3 sex, power and ancient DNA. Turi King hails David Reich’s thrilling account of mapping humans through time and place. Ewen Callaway, Nature. March 13, 2018 https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-018-02964-5 and Ancient-genome study finds Bronze Age ‘Beaker culture’ invaded Britain. Famous bell-shaped pots associated with group of immigrants who may have displaced Neolithic farmers. Ewen Callaway, Nature, May 17, 2017 https://www.nature.com/news/ancient-genome-study-finds-bronze-age-beaker-culture-invaded-britain-1.21996 Yours, Paul H.
  22. Fake or Fossil? Ichthyosaur to ‘iffyosaur’ Part #1 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=okjpbpD_My0 Fake or Fossil? UV exposes plaster Part #2 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rCss3BWohPI Dean R. Lomax - Life as a palaeontologis https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCnuR8gNE-GXYyiA8eE-5p2w A published paper about composites is: Massare, J.A. and Lomax, D.R., 2016. Composite skeletons of Ichthyosaurus in historic collections. Paludicola, 10, pp. 207-250. PDF file at: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/303932537_Composite_skeletons_of_Ichthyosaurus_in_historic_collections https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Judy_Massare http://www.academia.edu/26087070/Composite_skeletons_of_Ichthyosaurus_in_historic_collections http://brockport.academia.edu/JudyMassare “…we describe nearly complete skeletons of the Lower Jurassic genus Ichthyosaurus that are probably composites or that, at least, require further examination to assess their authenticity.” Yours, Paul H.
  23. WALES!!!!PALEOZOIC!!!!

    DavMoly size:about 6,5 Mb B(ritish)G(eological)S(urvey)!! Lovely 3d images of some marker chitinozoa Mouthwatering,and nothing less. Thoroughly recommended NB I've never seen an uglier landscape than that of Wales editorial note:its content is not dissimilar to(below)
  24. I found this fossil on the beach at Watermouth Cove North Devon U.K. Among small stones at the edge of a freshwater stream that flows across the beach. I would be grateful for help to identify it. Many thanks.
  25. Dinosaur skeleton discovered under Surrey brick factory. Near-complete fossilised skeleton of 132m-year-old creature, believed to be an Iguanodon, has been taken to special laboratory for further investigation. Nicola Davis, The Guardian, July 4, 2017 https://www.theguardian.com/science/2017/jul/04/dinosaur-remains-surrey-iguanodon Yours, Paul H.
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