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Found 16 results

  1. Quenstedtoceras Ammonite

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Quenstedtoceras Ammonite United Kingdom Jurassic Period (~112 Million Years Ago) Quenstedtoceras is a genus of ammonoid cephalopods that lived during the latter part of the Jurassic period in what is now France, Germany, and the United Kingdom. The shell of Quenstedtoceras is typically evolute and strongly ribbed, with all whorls visible. Widths vary according to the species from rather narrow to somewhat broad, as does ribbing. Ribs commonly start at the umbilical shoulder and extend laterally to about mid flank where they divide and curve forward toward the outer rim, or venter, and meet at a keel. Shells are of moderate size, commonly reaching diameters of about 6 cm (2.4 in). Quenstedtoceras, included in the superfamily Stephanocerataceae, now revised to Stephanoceratoidea, is first of the subfamily Cardioceratinae, derived from Cadoceras or related genus is the mid or late Callovian and gave rise at the end of its range in the early Oxfordian to Cardioceras. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Mollusca Class: Cephalopoda Order: †Ammonitida Family: †Cardioceratidae Subfamily: †Cardioceratinae Genus: †Quenstedtoceras
  2. Quenstedtoceras Ammonite

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Quenstedtoceras Ammonite United Kingdom Jurassic Period (~112 Million Years Ago) Quenstedtoceras is a genus of ammonoid cephalopods that lived during the latter part of the Jurassic period in what is now France, Germany, and the United Kingdom. The shell of Quenstedtoceras is typically evolute and strongly ribbed, with all whorls visible. Widths vary according to the species from rather narrow to somewhat broad, as does ribbing. Ribs commonly start at the umbilical shoulder and extend laterally to about mid flank where they divide and curve forward toward the outer rim, or venter, and meet at a keel. Shells are of moderate size, commonly reaching diameters of about 6 cm (2.4 in). Quenstedtoceras, included in the superfamily Stephanocerataceae, now revised to Stephanoceratoidea, is first of the subfamily Cardioceratinae, derived from Cadoceras or related genus is the mid or late Callovian and gave rise at the end of its range in the early Oxfordian to Cardioceras. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Mollusca Class: Cephalopoda Order: †Ammonitida Family: †Cardioceratidae Subfamily: †Cardioceratinae Genus: †Quenstedtoceras
  3. On the use and abuse of ancient DNA.

    On the use and abuse of ancient DNA. Researchers in several disciplines need to tread carefully over shared landscapes of the past. Ewen Callaway, Nature. March 18, 2018 https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-018-03773-6 Some related articles are: Editorial: On the use and abuse of ancient DNA. Researchers in several disciplines need to tread carefully over shared landscapes of the past. Nature 555, 559 (2018) https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-018-03857-3 sex, power and ancient DNA. Turi King hails David Reich’s thrilling account of mapping humans through time and place. Ewen Callaway, Nature. March 13, 2018 https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-018-02964-5 and Ancient-genome study finds Bronze Age ‘Beaker culture’ invaded Britain. Famous bell-shaped pots associated with group of immigrants who may have displaced Neolithic farmers. Ewen Callaway, Nature, May 17, 2017 https://www.nature.com/news/ancient-genome-study-finds-bronze-age-beaker-culture-invaded-britain-1.21996 Yours, Paul H.
  4. Fake or Fossil? Ichthyosaur to ‘iffyosaur’ Part #1 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=okjpbpD_My0 Fake or Fossil? UV exposes plaster Part #2 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rCss3BWohPI Dean R. Lomax - Life as a palaeontologis https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCnuR8gNE-GXYyiA8eE-5p2w A published paper about composites is: Massare, J.A. and Lomax, D.R., 2016. Composite skeletons of Ichthyosaurus in historic collections. Paludicola, 10, pp. 207-250. PDF file at: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/303932537_Composite_skeletons_of_Ichthyosaurus_in_historic_collections https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Judy_Massare http://www.academia.edu/26087070/Composite_skeletons_of_Ichthyosaurus_in_historic_collections http://brockport.academia.edu/JudyMassare “…we describe nearly complete skeletons of the Lower Jurassic genus Ichthyosaurus that are probably composites or that, at least, require further examination to assess their authenticity.” Yours, Paul H.
  5. WALES!!!!PALEOZOIC!!!!

    DavMoly size:about 6,5 Mb B(ritish)G(eological)S(urvey)!! Lovely 3d images of some marker chitinozoa Mouthwatering,and nothing less. Thoroughly recommended NB I've never seen an uglier landscape than that of Wales editorial note:its content is not dissimilar to(below)
  6. I found this fossil on the beach at Watermouth Cove North Devon U.K. Among small stones at the edge of a freshwater stream that flows across the beach. I would be grateful for help to identify it. Many thanks.
  7. Dinosaur skeleton discovered under Surrey brick factory. Near-complete fossilised skeleton of 132m-year-old creature, believed to be an Iguanodon, has been taken to special laboratory for further investigation. Nicola Davis, The Guardian, July 4, 2017 https://www.theguardian.com/science/2017/jul/04/dinosaur-remains-surrey-iguanodon Yours, Paul H.
  8. ancient urchin

    Yes,L.& E. http://www.thefossilforum.com/index.php?/topic/65304-archaeocidaris-teeth-and-other-bits-uk/#comment-683845 http://www.thefossilforum.com/index.php?/topic/41735-another-quiz/#comment-455460
  9. Part of Jawbone?

    Hi there, We found this today on the beach at Walton-on-Naze, in Essex. We're keen to see if anyone can help identify the fossil. Thanks, G.
  10. Coprolite with cephalopod inclusions

    This coprolite is from a marine creature that swam in the Jurassic seas that once covered this parts of England. The dark inclusions that can be seen on the surface are cephalopod hooks. In April 2016, the University of Minnesota X-ray Computed Tomography Lab scanned the specimen using a X5000 high resolution microCT system with a twin head 225 kV x-ray source and a Dexela area detector (3073 x 3889 pixels). Many of the images shown here are of individual 3D elements/features within the coprolite that were separated/isolated using Blob3D. The taxonomic classification given is for the inclusions, not the coprolite. Aside from the hooks, it is hard to definitively identify the inclusions without damage to the coprolite. The following is a list of inclusions: 241 hooks of various sizes that are at least 75% intact. 200+ plate-like fragments of various sizes. 19 ellipsoidal structures, possibly forams or parasite eggs. 2 unidentified long, straight conical structures joined at wide end (A) 1 long rod-like structure with a bulbous end (B) 1 unidentified mass that looks like it was the attachment point for 5 rod-like structures (C) 1 1ong cylindrical (rod) structure that tapers in the center. The center density is much lower than the outer shell (D) 1 irregular structure that looks I originally thought might be an ink sack or buccal mass, but the size is wrong. Experta think it is more likely foraminifera (E) 1 irregular structure, possibly a statolith (F) Acknowledgements: Thank you to Neale Monks and Christian Klug for providing input.
  11. calamitous botany

    If previously posted ,all praise(if any) should go to that previous poster barryUKCalamiBrym.pdf
  12. The Lower Cretaceous of the UK

    from the BGS: HopsonUKLower_Cretaceous_Stratigraph_Framework_ReportD.pdf
  13. ichthyosaur diversity

    https://peerj.com/articles/2604.pdf
  14. My first Scunthrope ammonite!

    Hi, Just wanted to share my excitement at finally getting a chance to own a genuine lower lias ammonite from the infamous (now sadly closed/filled in) ironstone quarry in Scunthorpe (United Kingdom,Lincolnshire). The fossils found within this locality are mostly preserved in pure calcite and have a range of colours which include stunning/natural pinks and greens. It's due to arrive tomorrow! but I feel so privileged and lucky to grab one and also from a highly revered/professional prepper in the United Kingdom! : http://www.yorkshirecoastfossils.co.uk/scunthorpe_fossils.htm It's only a small specimen (Aegasteroceras sp) but still stunningly beautiful! Scunthorpe ammonites are among the most beautiful in the world (in my opinion) and if you can grab one, grab one whilst they are still within price range for most people because like all things they will go up in value as the years go by due to the quarry being closed. (As it hasn't arrived yet this photo isn't mine! and is property of "Yorkshire coast fossils", but sharing to share my excitement.)
  15. Hi, i was hoping someone could help me identify whether the following photos are a concretion or a fossil. The piece was found poking out of a lump of clay fallen from the cliff at Robin Hoods Bay, North Yorkshire, UK. It looks like one end is broken off and there is an outer layer which is a mid grey colour with brown patches and the inner is a much darker grey to almost black. The dimensions are around 9" by 4" by 3". Any help much appreciated, thanks Simon
  16. I'll like to check out are these Arnioceras ammonites pyritized? They are from Yorkshire UK. I want to know in your opinion, are these ammonites pyritized or non-pyritized? Link to the picture: https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10201976908256821&set=a.3256541024913.135604.1608741583&type=3&theater
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