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Found 154 results

  1. Identification

    Curious as to types of petrified wood this may be. Photos are not great but best as I can do for now. I love petrified wood and new to identification of types but trying. Most of my samples are found at really high elevation on mountain tops, which intruiges me when I read how it is formed. I'm no.longer able physically to go Out anymore, these are finds from many years ago that now I'm curious into more the types now. Excuse the spelling as I have my kid posting for me. I can't text with his hands hardly anymore.She Thanks for any comments.
  2. I'm trying to identify the polished fossil material in this Georgian English snuffbox, circa 1760 to 1820. Is it mammoth ivory? Walrus? Wood? Something else? The material is set in unhallmarked sterling silver. Thanks in advance for your suggestions. Adam
  3. Fluorescent Petrified Wood

    From the album Fluorescent Petrified Wood

    Cypress Wood, viewed under short-wave ultraviolet light Miocene Odessa, Delaware
  4. Fluorescent Petrified Wood

    From the album Fluorescent Petrified Wood

    Cypress Wood, viewed under short-wave ultraviolet light Miocene Odessa, Delaware
  5. Fluorescent Petrified Wood

    From the album Fluorescent Petrified Wood

    Cypress Wood, viewed under short-wave ultraviolet light Miocene Odessa, Delaware
  6. Fluorescent Petrified Wood

    From the album Fluorescent Petrified Wood

    Cypress Wood, viewed under short-wave ultraviolet light Miocene Odessa, Delaware
  7. Fluorescent Petrified Wood

    From the album Fluorescent Petrified Wood

    Cypress Wood, viewed under short-wave ultraviolet light Miocene Odessa, Delaware
  8. Blue Forest Fluorescent Petrified Wood

    From the album Fluorescent Petrified Wood

    Petrified Wood viewed under short-wave ultraviolet light Eocene Blue Forest, Wyoming
  9. Blue Forest Fluorescent Petrified Wood

    From the album Fluorescent Petrified Wood

    Petrified Wood viewed under short-wave ultraviolet light Eocene Blue Forest, Wyoming
  10. Blue Forest Fluorescent Petrified Wood

    From the album Fluorescent Petrified Wood

    Petrified Wood viewed under short-wave ultraviolet light Eocene Blue Forest, Wyoming
  11. Mess of Things I need Identifyed

    Ok, I went looking for fossils in Renton, Washington state. I also went to Tukwila Washington (supposedly there are plant fossils here.) I found some things and maybe anyone could confirm if they are indeed fossils or something else. I'm not aiming for species of genus, the quality of these are not to that level, BUT if you have an idea, let me know. Thanks all. (I'm going to do kind of a dump here with all my findings.) Fig. A: Found in Green River Tukwila Washington. Not sure just picked the piece up about 1 1/2 inches long. Fig. B: Found in sedimentary rock in Renton Cedar river park. (people have found fossils here before) The picture of the boulder shows where the rock / fossil was lodged into it. Fig. C: I have no idea, it jumped out at me at Cedar River on the river bank next to a natural cut in the sediment. Fig. D: I believe this is old Carbonized wood or something like that but I'm so amateur I probably don't know what I'm talking about. It was found in the sediment (in the picture you can see it sticking out of rock). The Geologic map says Renton is in the Eocene time period but I know wood takes 300 million years to carbonize (So I read) Anyways if you could tell me how this got so deep in the sediments and maybe its age that would be great. (the sediment was on the side of a cliff so it wasn't someone's campfire unless they broke gravity.) Fig. E: Again, not sure. It feels like carbon but maybe with bark or something on it. --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- The last few images I couldn't take home because they were too huge ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Fern maybe: I found this in Renton WA by Green river. Carbonized Log Maybe: I found this streak of charcoal looking substance imbedded in a rock and I cant get it out but it is indeed deep in the rock. You can see on the side that it goes all the way through. Tukwila Maybe Plant: Probably the only fossil I found so far. I have my best bet on this one. No idea what it truly is. Dash Point Leaf?: At Dash point Tacoma Washington I found this chunk of clay with a deciduous looking leaf shape but I did not take it home with me. A lot of this clay had black splotches on it and it was probably only a coincidence. If you made it this far holy cow I'm sorry for just dumping but anything helps. THANK YOU!
  12. bumpy stubby wood or coral?

    coral wood or something else? found west of Houston in a gravel load from the Brazos River I have taken the pics in two different lights, this what ever it is seemed out of place only one like it in the location that I could find... could be a fragment of something larger I don't know.
  13. Just for a bit if background I was collecting at turimetta headland bear Sydney and I had found several ferns which was decent considering I only had 1 hour but on my way back I spotted these and was wondering whether they were fossils too (probably not knowing me (; )
  14. Petrified Wood

    From the album Delaware Fossils

    Generally considered to be cypress wood, but there is some evidence for larger species in the Cupressaceae family. Miocene New Castle County, Delaware
  15. Petrified Wood

    From the album Delaware Fossils

    Generally considered to be cypress wood, but there is some evidence for larger species in the Cupressaceae family. Miocene New Castle County, Delaware
  16. Petrified Wood

    From the album Delaware Fossils

    Generally considered to be cypress wood, but there is some evidence for larger species in the Cupressaceae family. Miocene New Castle County, Delaware
  17. Petrified Wood

    From the album Delaware Fossils

    Generally considered to be cypress wood, but there is some evidence for larger species in the Cupressaceae family. Miocene New Castle County, Delaware
  18. Petrified Wood

    From the album Delaware Fossils

    Generally considered to be cypress wood, but there is some evidence for larger species in the Cupressaceae family. Miocene New Castle County, Delaware
  19. Petrified Wood

    From the album Delaware Fossils

    Generally considered to be cypress wood, but there is some evidence for larger species in the Cupressaceae family. The black, crystalized material is probably dendrites. Miocene New Castle County, Delaware
  20. Petrified Wood

    From the album Delaware Fossils

    Generally considered to be cypress wood, but there is some evidence for larger species in the Cupressaceae family. Miocene New Castle County, Delaware
  21. Hello everyone, I have a couple questions about these two items. The first is a badly crumbling piece of fossil wood. I have not tried stabilizing it yet, but I have heard that wood with this type of preservation always crumbles. If anyone has had luck stabilizing this type of NJ wood please let me know. I am almost completely sure the second piece is just an oddly worn small section of ratfish tritor, but I want to make sure it isn’t something else. Thanks for any help, Joseph
  22. Help with ID

    The attached weighs 8.6 lbs I am not sure what it is and I am hoping for some guidance. I know you are an expert.
  23. fossil limestone wood

    Nice day to all here ! Could anyone tell a tree? Location Czech Republic, limestone board. Because it has fallen in the limestone, the crust is quite cruel. It would probably break apart. Can you advise me to have a tip for conservation?
  24. Going through a forgotten corner of the basement last night I stumbled upon a box with some of my grandfather's "rocks" that my grandmother gave me when she sold her house and moved in with my mom a few years ago. As far as we (my grandmother, mom, and myself) know these were all found in Maryland. He worked for the state dot for years as a bridge inspector so they could be from anywhere in the state. The lighter 2 pieces I am confident that they are petrified wood, the brown/red looking one I am not as sure. The brown/red piece's outside is almost like spaghetti noodles laying tight against each other for lack of a better description.
  25. I've been reading about the potential for lignite to spontaneously combust, which has gotten me thinking a bit. It's mentioned in the Wikipedia page for Lignite, as well as in paper such as this: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0010218002005539 I sometimes collect pieces of lignite from locations around the UK, if they preserve the shape and texture of the wood. Is there any risk of them suddenly bursting into flames? I'd have thought not, since I've never heard of such a thing happening, but then I suppose not many people collect these bits because they usually fall to pieces after a while (I treat them through soaking in a sugar solution to preserve them). Any thoughts?
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