Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'xenacanthus'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
    Tags should be keywords or key phrases. e.g. carcharodon, pliocene, cypresshead formation, florida.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Fossil Discussion
    • General Fossil Discussion
    • Fossil Hunting Trips
    • Fossil ID
    • Is It Real? How to Recognize Fossil Fabrications
    • Partners in Paleontology - Member Contributions to Science
    • Questions & Answers
    • Fossil of the Month
    • Member Collections
    • A Trip to the Museum
    • Paleo Re-creations
    • Collecting Gear
    • Fossil Preparation
    • Member Fossil Trades Bulletin Board
    • Member-to-Member Fossil Sales
    • Fossil News
  • Gallery
  • Fossil Sites
    • Africa
    • Asia
    • Australia - New Zealand
    • Canada
    • Europe
    • Middle East
    • South America
    • United States
  • Fossil Media
    • Members Websites
    • Fossils On The Web
    • Fossil Photography
    • Fossil Literature
    • Documents

Blogs

  • Anson's Blog
  • Mudding Around
  • Nicholas' Blog
  • dinosaur50's Blog
  • Traviscounty's Blog
  • Seldom's Blog
  • tracer's tidbits
  • Sacredsin's Blog
  • fossilfacetheprospector's Blog
  • jax world
  • echinoman's Blog
  • Ammonoidea
  • Traviscounty's Blog
  • brsr0131's Blog
  • brsr0131's Blog
  • Adventures with a Paddle
  • Caveat emptor
  • -------
  • Fig Rocks' Blog
  • placoderms
  • mosasaurs
  • ozzyrules244's Blog
  • Sir Knightia's Blog
  • Terry Dactyll's Blog
  • shakinchevy2008's Blog
  • MaHa's Blog
  • Stratio's Blog
  • ROOKMANDON's Blog
  • Phoenixflood's Blog
  • Brett Breakin' Rocks' Blog
  • Seattleguy's Blog
  • jkfoam's Blog
  • Erwan's Blog
  • Erwan's Blog
  • Lindsey's Blog
  • marksfossils' Blog
  • ibanda89's Blog
  • Liberty's Blog
  • Liberty's Blog
  • Back of Beyond
  • St. Johns River Shark Teeth/Florida
  • Ameenah's Blog
  • gordon's Blog
  • West4me's Blog
  • West4me's Blog
  • Pennsylvania Perspectives
  • michigantim's Blog
  • michigantim's Blog
  • lauraharp's Blog
  • lauraharp's Blog
  • micropterus101's Blog
  • micropterus101's Blog
  • GPeach129's Blog
  • nicciann's Blog
  • Olenellus' Blog
  • nicciann's Blog
  • maybe a nest fossil?
  • Deep-Thinker's Blog
  • Deep-Thinker's Blog
  • bear-dog's Blog
  • javidal's Blog
  • Digging America
  • John Sun's Blog
  • John Sun's Blog
  • Ravsiden's Blog
  • Jurassic park
  • The Hunt for Fossils
  • The Fury's Grand Blog
  • julie's ??
  • Hunt'n 'odonts!
  • falcondob's Blog
  • Monkeyfuss' Blog
  • cyndy's Blog
  • pattyf's Blog
  • pattyf's Blog
  • chrisf's Blog
  • chrisf's Blog
  • nola's Blog
  • mercyrcfans88's Blog
  • Emily's PRI Adventure
  • trilobite guy's Blog
  • xenacanthus' Blog
  • barnes' Blog
  • myfossiltrips.blogspot.com
  • HeritageFossils' Blog
  • Fossilefinder's Blog
  • Fossilefinder's Blog
  • Emily's MotE Adventure
  • farfarawy's Blog
  • Microfossil Mania!
  • A Novice Geologist
  • Southern Comfort
  • Eli's Blog
  • andreas' Blog
  • Recent Collecting Trips
  • retired blog
  • Stocksdale's Blog
  • andreas' Blog test
  • fossilman7's Blog
  • Books I have enjoyed
  • Piranha Blog
  • xonenine's blog
  • xonenine's Blog
  • Fossil collecting and SAFETY
  • Detrius
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • Jocky's Blog
  • Jocky's Blog
  • Kehbe's Kwips
  • RomanK's Blog
  • Prehistoric Planet Trilogy
  • mikeymig's Blog
  • Western NY Explorer's Blog
  • Regg Cato's Blog
  • VisionXray23's Blog
  • Carcharodontosaurus' Blog
  • What is the largest dragonfly fossil? What are the top contenders?
  • Hihimanu Hale
  • Test Blog
  • jsnrice's blog
  • Lise MacFadden's Poetry Blog
  • BluffCountryFossils Adventure Blog
  • meadow's Blog
  • Makeing The Unlikley Happen
  • KansasFossilHunter's Blog
  • DarrenElliot's Blog
  • jesus' Blog
  • A Mesozoic Mosaic
  • Dinosaur comic
  • Zookeeperfossils
  • Cameronballislife31's Blog
  • My Blog
  • TomKoss' Blog
  • A guide to calcanea and astragali
  • Group Blog Test
  • Paleo Rantings of a Blockhead
  • Dead Dino is Art
  • The Amber Blog
  • TyrannosaurusRex's Facts
  • PaleoWilliam's Blog
  • The Paleo-Tourist
  • The Community Post
  • Lyndon D Agate Johnson's Blog
  • BRobinson7's Blog
  • Eastern NC Trip Reports
  • Toofuntahh's Blog
  • Pterodactyl's Blog
  • A Beginner's Foray into Fossiling
  • Micropaleontology blog
  • Pondering on Dinosaurs
  • Fossil Preparation Blog
  • On Dinosaurs and Media
  • cheney416's fossil story
  • jpc
  • Red-Headed Red-Neck Rock-Hound w/ My Trusty HellHound Cerberus
  • Red Headed
  • Paleo-Profiles
  • Walt's Blog
  • Between A Rock And A Hard Place
  • Rudist digging at "Point 25", St. Bartholomä, Styria, Austria (Campanian, Gosau-group)
  • Prognathodon saturator 101

Calendars

  • Calendar

Categories

  • Annelids
  • Arthropods
    • Crustaceans
    • Insects
    • Trilobites
    • Other Arthropods
  • Brachiopods
  • Cnidarians (Corals, Jellyfish, Conulariids )
    • Corals
    • Jellyfish, Conulariids, etc.
  • Echinoderms
    • Crinoids & Blastoids
    • Echinoids
    • Other Echinoderms
    • Starfish and Brittlestars
  • Forams
  • Graptolites
  • Molluscs
    • Bivalves
    • Cephalopods (Ammonites, Belemnites, Nautiloids)
    • Gastropods
    • Other Molluscs
  • Sponges
  • Bryozoans
  • Other Invertebrates
  • Ichnofossils
  • Plants
  • Chordata
    • Amphibians & Reptiles
    • Birds
    • Dinosaurs
    • Fishes
    • Mammals
    • Sharks & Rays
    • Other Chordates
  • *Pseudofossils ( Inorganic objects , markings, or impressions that resemble fossils.)

Found 7 results

  1. Hi all, Recently I was collecting at a locality that exposes the Duquesne Limestone and shale, which if you’ve seen any of my previous posts you’ll know that I’ve collected extensively. But for those of you that have not, the Duquesne shale is a layer of black, carbonaceous shale found in areas where the Conemaugh group is exposed. This layer is chalk full of disarticulated vertebrate remains, but some of the most recognizable are the teeth of Orthacanthus and Xenacanthus. These were eel-like sharks that existed from the Devonian-Triassic and had bicuspid or tricuspid teeth. They grew to be about 10-12 feet at the largest and thrived in the swampy lakes of the late Pennsylvanian. It’s somewhat uncommon for me to find a large Orthacanthus tooth (which are tiny compared to Otodus sp. )and it is even rarer for me to find a tooth with feeding damage. It seems to me that, understandably, many collectors of Cenozoic shark teeth are disappointed when they find shark teeth with feeding damage, but for me at least when I find Paleozoic shark teeth with feeding damage it makes it even more special. Last time I was collecting I did just that. Interestingly enough this Orthacanthus compressus tooth is my largest yet and has a very unusual break. The cusp that is missing is not broken cleanly at the enamel, rather, when it broke off it took a good chunk of the rooth with it. To me at least this would indicate that the shark was using quite a bit of force when it bit down, and whatever it bit in to must have been very hard and made for a painful meal for the shark. It’s important to note that the other cusp was damaged recently and isn’t feeding damage. I’m not one to heavily speculate but I’d imagine that it had to have bit in to one of the heavily armored Paleoniscoids for damage of this nature to take place. Or, who knows, the tooth might have just been old. Whatever happened to break the cusp is lost to time, I guess. Regardless, I think it’s a wonderful find and reminds me that these animals were truly alive and had imperfections. Hopefully you all find this as interesting as I do .
  2. Hello everyone, Curious if anyone knows the difference between Xenacanthus and Orthacanthus shark teeth? Particularly as it concerns shark teeth from the Permian site in Waurika, Oklahoma? Have quite a few shark teeth from there and am unsure how to determine which is which. There's also Barbclabornia, to complicate matters! Any help would be appreciated (and yes, I have seen the rhynie chert website on them, but it doesn't show/tell the difference between the three kinds)
  3. Xenacanthiformes collection

    Here are my best fossils of Xenacanthiformes. All are from the British Coal Measures (Upper Carboniferous). The first one I suspect may be Orthacanthus due to the width of the cusps, though Xenacanthus teeth sometimes have quite wide cusps. I think all of the other teeth are Xenacanthus. The second one seems very large for Xenacanthus (I suspect around 14-15mm though it’s difficult to tell how far under the rock the cusps go) but I’m fairly sure it’s Xenacanthus rather than Orthacanthus. The third photo is what I believe to be a Xenacanthus denticle.
  4. Hi all, I have seen and heard from multiple different sources that the cephalic spines of Xenacanthid sharks are considered to have been venomous. This is usually supported by the serrated nature of these spines and a canal that runs down the middle of them. Has any research been done to prove or disprove this hypothesis. I know that we can never know for sure but I am curious if there is any scientific support to these claims. Thanks in advance, Zach
  5. This head spine has just reappeared in my collection - I must have found it about 20 years ago in Linton. Is that an Orthacanthus or Xenacanthus head spine? The length is about 8 cm / 3". Thanks Thomas
  6. Any Permian/Carboniferous shark experts?

    Found this last Sunday. And i can't seem to narrow down who lost it, Xenacanthus or Orthacanthus. To my knowledge neither has been formally described from the location it was found. And, no, i will not say where. I'll simply say LaSalle county, IL. Still not sure if my site is Permian or Carboniferous. I'm 90% convinced it's Carboniferous. Any ID help is much appreicated. I'm leaning more towards Orthacanthus. Sorry, i'll add mm later. As found: After some needle prep:
  7. Devonian? Xenacanthus tooth

    First off, I apologize for the poor image quality... The pictures were taken quickly with my phone camera through a microscope. If anyone is interested I'll get out a proper camera later and try again. I found this while searching some Widder formation matrix collected in Arkona ontario. It is roughly 1 mm across. I am fairly certain the tooth belonged to a Xenacanth. Has anyone found these in the area before or did it migrate from somewhere else? Note: the tooth is smooth. The serrated look is caused by pixels in #2
×