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fossilsonwheels

First picture is one of the boxes of random shark stuff laying around the house lol As we take apart the displays and new stuff arrives, we label and carefully store. It’s not as chaotic as it looks 

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fossilsonwheels

The Heterodontus display as it is. One of my two favorite sharks to talk about along with Squatina. Top left two teeth are Jurassic specimens from the UK. Then a really nice Cretaceous tooth from Texas. The tiny light colored one is a Paleocene tooth from Morocco. A really nifty fin spine from STH is new and I love it. 

 

We are waiting on an anterior tooth from STH and I am leaning toward also adding a Chilean tooth or an Eocene UK tooth or both if finances permit lol

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fossilsonwheels

Forgot to add the picture

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Tidgy's Dad

Good luck with this.

You're certainly off to a good start.:)

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fossilsonwheels
9 minutes ago, Tidgy's Dad said:

Good luck with this.

You're certainly off to a good start.:)

Thank you. I am really loving this and I think these will be really cool when it’s all done :) 

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FossilNerd

This is very cool stuff! You obviously have a passion for it and I can see how it would flow better for educational purposes. Well done! :thumbsu:

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fossilsonwheels
1 hour ago, FossilNerd said:

This is very cool stuff! You obviously have a passion for it and I can see how it would flow better for educational purposes. Well done! :thumbsu:

Thank you. We do have the passion and I’m excited about this direction. The work will be worth it. 

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fossilsonwheels

My work schedule is super busy the rest of this week so I won’t have a chance to add to this for a few days. I wanted to post this as the “before” pic lol 

 

The Carpet Sharks present an interesting problem for us. Tiny teeth but it’s an order with some diversity so this has become our tweener order so to speak. I don’t think it’ll fit in a 8x12 and it’s not enough to really fill in a larger display.

 

In the photo you’ll see Cretorectolobus, Cederastroemia, Orectolobus, Nebrius, Ginglymostoma, Plicatoscyllium, and Chiloscyllium. In addition to what you see we have Paleocene Chiloscyllium and Palaeorhincodon teeth yet to arrive. We have a pretty good representation of temporal range(Jurassic-Miocene) and some decent diversity. There are teeth from North America, the UK, Russia, and North Africa. 

 

I am not sure we can scrounge up much else from the Carpet Sharks so we’ll just use spacing in a larger display to make it look nice. I am pretty proud of this collection, humble as it is lol

 

 

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fossilsonwheels

The Angelshark display is nearly complete with the arrival of a Chilean Squatina. We should have our Jurassic Angelshark tooth within a week or so which will finish this display. This is my favorite shark and I love talking about them. 

 

Not a ton of fossils obviously but we can show people teeth as far back as the Jurassic and from some pretty cool locations/formations. 

 

I also take great pride in the time we spend in every program talking about shark conservation and specifically Angelshark conservation. 

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Mahnmut

Great idea!

In my eyes taxonomy is the one thing that can bring an order to the wonderful diversity of life that puny humans can understand.

I have been pondering a way to organize my collection for some time. It would be great if one could arrange things in 4-5 dimensions (geological age, geographic range, taxonomic group, ecological niche, habitat (terrestrial, aquatic, arboreal... not as diverse in sharks.)

But maybe 2-3 are enough, many evolutionary trees have kind of a time axis from bottom to top, so you could keep info on geological era in the taxonomic display like that.

Best Regards,

J

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fossilsonwheels
On 2/20/2020 at 4:57 AM, Mahnmut said:

Great idea!

In my eyes taxonomy is the one thing that can bring an order to the wonderful diversity of life that puny humans can understand.

I have been pondering a way to organize my collection for some time. It would be great if one could arrange things in 4-5 dimensions (geological age, geographic range, taxonomic group, ecological niche, habitat (terrestrial, aquatic, arboreal... not as diverse in sharks.)

But maybe 2-3 are enough, many evolutionary trees have kind of a time axis from bottom to top, so you could keep info on geological era in the taxonomic display like that.

Best Regards,

J

Hi J

 

I absolutely understand. Even using a strictly taxonomic style has drawbacks. We can utilize both taxonomic and temporal range organization in these displays. Within each taxonomic display, the teeth are organized by temporal range too. Our Angelsharks for example, go from Jurassic to Miocene/Pliocene if you go left to right in this display. 

 

It has been a highly educational project as I’ve gotten a deeper understanding of the relationships between sharks within an order and I have a much better understanding of the biological information. 

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fossilsonwheels

This may move to a slightly larger display box to accommodate more Scapanorhynchus teeth but this is the general idea of the Mitsukurinidae display. We LOVE Goblins and so do the kids. The Lamniformes will take up at least 4 displays, 5 if we house Megachasma and Cetorhinus in a small separate display. I thought the Goblins needed their own space lol 

 

We cover three different species of Scapanorhynchus and have teeth from the US (New Mexico, Texas, New Jersey, North Carolina, Mississippi, Colorado) and one from Kazakhstan. 

 

We have a Cretaceous Anomotodon from Morocco and an Eocene one from Virginia. 

 

Today we got the last piece of the puzzle and it is AWESOME. Our first Mitsukurina tooth from the Miocene of France :) 

 

Given the popularity of Goblins and the wealth of interesting adaptations, it made sense to make the effort to track down as much as we could. The Mitsukurina makes this feel complete and I am pretty proud of this one. 

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siteseer

Hi Kurt,

 

For anything you can't find right away, you can always use a photo/photocopy.  Some of those squaliforms and cat sharks are so small you might want an enlarged photo anyway.

 

I'll try to get the box out to you this week.

 

Jess

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fossilsonwheels
1 hour ago, siteseer said:

Hi Kurt,

 

For anything you can't find right away, you can always use a photo/photocopy.  Some of those squaliforms and cat sharks are so small you might want an enlarged photo anyway.

 

I'll try to get the box out to you this week.

 

Jess

Hi Jess

 

One of the things we are working on is some photographs of the smaller teeth. This has turned into quite a project. Once it is all done the work will have been worth it. Hopefully lol

 

No worries. At your convenience. 

 

Kurt

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fossilsonwheels

Second completed display, Heterodontiformes. The Bullhead Sharks are one of my favorite sharks. I think we have some excellent fossils (anterior, lateral, anterior-lateral teeth and a nice fin spine to boot). 

 

Adaptations- bite force/jaw strength, defensive spine

 

Temporal range- Jurassic to Miocene 

 

Distribution- Europe, North America, Africa

 

It will be quite some time before these displays are seen by anybody in the form of a program so we may be able to expand on this with a Chilean tooth or something. 

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fossilsonwheels

Hexanchiformes, our Cow Shark display has come along way. 

 

Adaptations- super cool dentition, adaptable behavior 

 

Temporal Range- Cretaceous( Albian is the earliest) to Pliocene. 

 

Distribution- North America, South America, Europe, Asia, Africa

 

We got a ton of help putting this together. Pretty proud of this. Beautiful teeth, diverse locations 

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fossilsonwheels

Orectolobiformes 

 

One that is not finished. We have 10 teeth and need 15 to really fill the display. We should be able to finish this off in a month or two. 

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fossilsonwheels

Xenacanthiformes

 

Not the most expansive collection but it works. My favorite is the German tooth. 

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fossilsonwheels

Synechodontiformes 

 

It will be fun to use this in programs given these sharks are largely unknown to our audience. 

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fossilsonwheels

Orectolobiformes 

 

Our Carpet Shark display is coming along. We added a couple of Nurse Shark teeth and may be able to add another tooth to the display soon. 

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