Jump to content
Gottobecdn

Tree roots and a Worm?

Recommended Posts

Gottobecdn

Found this rock today hiking with the kids. Never really been much into fossils but man this was interesting. Started thinking about how old it might be and if there's anything else that I'm not seeing due to my lack of knowledge. Came across this site so thought I would post it . Found in Niagara Bruce Trail in Ontario Canada...Rock was probably 14"-16 by 10" by 8" deep. 

IMG_20200326_140908.jpg

IMG_20200326_140908~2.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Herb

possibly atatchment points  for mollusc  and part of a crinoid holdfast

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Gottobecdn

Appreciate the response. So much to learn and research just from thoes comments, thanks. Would a fossil like this be a "common" find in the Southern Ontario Region or would something showing this detail be fairly rare?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ruger9a

It's a very neat display piece either way.  I agree with Herb, it looks like a crinoid stem.  The illustration below should help.

Crinoid illustration - 5.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Shamalama

@piranha is correct, these are all trace fossils of burrows in soft sediment.  I argue against Crinoid stem for the segmented looking trace only because it "weaves" in and out of some of the other traces.  It it were a Crinoid stem, and those burrows were after the stem was buried, I would expect more disarticulation.

 

See this blog post (near bottom) about some that I found in my local Silurain: http://viewsofthemahantango.blogspot.com/2012/04/lewistown-narrows-roadcut.html

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
GeschWhat

I agree they are burrows. So, are the segmented items a cast of the worms/trace makers? If so, this is very, very, cool!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Gottobecdn

Went back out this morning to try and retrieve that rock, but hiking 3km with a 80lb stone up hills and over boulders proved to be more difficult than I imagined in my head. Only made it half way out. I did find this smaller piece in the same area so it wasn't a total loss.

IMG_20200327_132756~2.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
piranha

A textbook example of Arthrophycus with the median groove in evidence on some of the burrows. Bravo! :fistbump:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Gottobecdn

Lots of terminology that's all new to me. IAM enjoying the research of it all I must say tho. Any idea as to how old it may be?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
piranha

As previously mentioned, according to the literature: Arthrophycus in Ontario is reported from the Silurian.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Mark Kmiecik

Nice find, and the small one is much, much better detailed. Silurian is 444 to 419 million years old roughly. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Gottobecdn

Much respect of all your knowledge and your willingness to share it with me. I wasn't much into fossils before but can guarantee I will be spending countless hours researching this for myself and will definitely be looking down at every rock I step on while out in the bush from here on out. Thanks again guys!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×