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digit

You learn something every day (if you are lucky)

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Tidgy's Dad

Thanks. 

Indeed I have learned something new which is great and rather fascinating. 

And congrats on your new home, here's hoping you never have to mow the grass again. 

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grandpa

Ken, Congratulations on finishing the move to N. FL and close to FLMNH.  I know you've been looking forward to this.

 

Also congrats on a great scientific find (VFOTM?)  What an interesting discovery with some strong implications on the biota of the deposit.

 

So glad to see you are having fun!

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digit
15 minutes ago, grandpa said:

So glad to see you are having fun!

If you are not having fun you are doing something wrong. ;)

 

I'm happy to be able to finally start logging some hours of volunteer work for the FLMNH. Surprisingly, (or NOT!) most volunteers are not highly keen on picking through bag after bag of gravel looking for tiny micro-fossils. I enjoy the challenge so it is a way I can benefit the museum and learn a thing or two along the way.

 

Frog vomerine teeth were so out of left field that I felt I had to share that with the forum just to add a bit of surreal wonder and spread a bit of knowledge (though I don't suppose this is a topic that will prove useful on Jeopardy anytime soon). :P

 

 

Cheers.

 

-Ken

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FossilNerd

Well I certainly learned something new! I had no idea frogs even had vomerine teeth.

 

Congrats on everything! The move, the awesome finds, and most importantly... the lack of grass to mow! :P

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deutscheben

Congrats on the new home and personal fossil site! Those frog teeth are absolutely fascinating.

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fossilsonwheels

Congrats on the move and the finds !! I really enjoyed reading this and those frog pieces are awesome :) 

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thelivingdead531

Everything in the post is wonderful. Congrats on the move and having your own fossil hunting grounds, literally in your backyard! I didn’t even know what vomerine teeth were, let alone that frogs had them, so thanks for sharing that! 

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siteseer

Hi Ken,

 

It sounds like you live not far from the university.  I've spent a lot of time in the Gainesville area over the past fifteen years.  It gets a lot of rain in general but hurricanes tend to lose a lot of strength by the time they get to the area. 

 

A few years ago, I was visiting a friend southeast of Gainesville out in the country and saw some wild turkeys cross a clearing.  You might see some of those too.

 

You do have to be careful with fossil collecting in the creek.  I assume you can do it on your property and private property in general if you have permission but I heard the city recently outlawed collecting in creeks on city/county property.  You should look into that to nail down the particulars.

 

When I saw those fossils, I though they might be fish otoliths and would not have guessed frog stuff.  My second guess would have been seeds.

 

Jess

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Darbi

@digit, how do you distinguish fossilized vomerine teeth from the modern ones? Bright and vivid yellow color strikes me rather modern but please don't mind me, I'm just learning!

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digit
7 hours ago, siteseer said:

You do have to be careful with fossil collecting in the creek.  I assume you can do it on your property and private property in general if you have permission but I heard the city recently outlawed collecting in creeks on city/county property.  You should look into that to nail down the particulars.

Yup. They seem to be enforcing local laws prohibiting collecting in the creeks in town--I believe as the result of some people making a mess of the banks and generally ruining things for the rest of us. Because this creek is on my property I'm allowed to hunt fossils in it. Richard Hulbert has said as much and would like me to collect a diversity of chondrichthyan fossils so that we can write a paper on it. ;)

 

7 hours ago, siteseer said:

When I saw those fossils, I though they might be fish otoliths and would not have guessed frog stuff.  My second guess would have been seeds.

 

My first instinct was seeds as well due to the shape but the calcium phosphate composition nixed that idea.

 

24 minutes ago, Darbi said:

@digit, how do you distinguish fossilized vomerine teeth from the modern ones? Bright and vivid yellow color strikes me rather modern but please don't mind me, I'm just learning!

There are no dumb questions (excepting politicians, of course :P). The matrix that these frog vomerine teeth were picked from came from material about 20 feet below the surface in a formation that is late Miocene (as dated by a mixture of species including gomphotheres which predated the more modern mammoths/mastodons). If it was loose float material gathered from someplace like the Peace River then accurate dating would be more suspect.

 

 

Cheers.

 

-Ken

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Darbi
3 minutes ago, digit said:

If it was loose float material gathered from someplace like the Peace River then accurate dating would be more suspect.

Thanks! The quote above is more what my question was about.

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digit

Yup. I had found these in disturbed (gravel bed) float material instead of from an in-situ layer that was far below the present day ground level and in the presence of other species dating to about 5.5 Ma, then I'd be curious as to what possible modern day frogs could have vomerine teeth of this size and shape. The fossil site is primarily late Miocene with a little bit of older Eocene reworked material in there as well (it was a riverbed habitat which included some older material in the same way that the Peace River contains Plio/Pleistocene fossils with some modern bits mixed in.

 

 

Cheers.

 

-Ken

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