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BudB

Ellis County creek, September 8th

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BudB

I have been wanting to make it back to the Ellis County creek where I found so many teeth, but by the time I could do it, it had rained enough to raise the creek quite a bit. The water level has just now dropped again. I was working near Ellis County this morning, and when I finished very early, it seemed the perfect time to go back. Rain is forecast for this evening and the next couple of days that will likely bring the creek up again.

 

Below is what I found that was either loose, or easily removed from matrix.
 

 

ellis02102.jpg

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BudB

Here is a view of both sides of the tooth of the day.
 

 

ellis02101.jpg

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BudB

Once again, most of the Ptychodus teeth I found were tiny, but I did find this decent sized one. I brought home plenty of matrix, so I'll have some more fun hunting teeth after this trip.
 

 

ellis02103.jpg

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bthemoose

You've really found quite the spot!

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sharko69

Great spot! Beautiful finds! Keep that spot a secret.

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Darktooth

Looks like you had a great hunt! Thanks for sharing!

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fossilsonwheels

Great finds !!

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Uncle Siphuncle

Teeth often end up in lenticular lag deposits that are limited in extent.  Essentially a shallow depression in the sea floor that accumulated teeth etc when currents and/or wave action swept them into the lowest spot in the vicinity.  This is a common scenario in all ages of marine sediments.  I once found a 2 x 3 foot Eocene lag deposit that contained dozens of inch plus Galeocerdo and Brachycarcharias plus lots of smaller shark teeth, cutlass fish and barracuda teeth, my best ever shark vert, croc osteoderms, teeth and a nice croc vert, plus 50 big, thick gar scales.  These little lenses can be wet screened with a course and fine mesh screen to reveal treasures of all sizes.

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henpecked

You did well thanks for sharing

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LSCHNELLE

Uncle Siphuncle has a good answer.  My wife and I found a pocket of 150 Ptychodus teeth (mostly rice sized) plus a medium mosasaur tooth and big xiphactinus vert with a few nice regular shark's teeth in a 3 foot by 1.5 foot by 0.1 foot thick area. Definitely, it was in a lowermost bedding plane depositional shell hash of the Eagle Ford in that immediate area of the South Bosque Member.  I believe that you are better off digging for vert fossils in the formation (if acceptable by local laws or the landowner) than you are surface hunting or sifting. This is because only the most durable (medium to large) vert material survives high energy stream erosional processes and even then such vert material is often beaten up by other rocks/gravel. But, extracted from a soft formation matrix, teeth more often have roots attached and the material generally is in much better condition.

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LSCHNELLE
On 9/8/2020 at 6:44 PM, BudB said:

Once again, most of the Ptychodus teeth I found were tiny, but I did find this decent sized one. I brought home plenty of matrix, so I'll have some more fun hunting teeth after this trip.
 

 

ellis02103.jpg

BudB, can you send a couple of closeup side views of this Ptychodus tooth?  Try propping your cell phone on the counter or on top of a short glass. It helps with focus.  I am guessing this tooth is either a large P. anonymous or something else.  A side view would help. 

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BudB
On 9/18/2020 at 1:40 PM, LSCHNELLE said:

BudB, can you send a couple of closeup side views of this Ptychodus tooth?  Try propping your cell phone on the counter or on top of a short glass. It helps with focus.  I am guessing this tooth is either a large P. anonymous or something else.  A side view would help. 

 

I had a tough time getting clear side view photos.

 

 

ellis02105.jpg

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LSCHNELLE
1 hour ago, BudB said:

 

I had a tough time getting clear side view photos.

 

 

ellis02105.jpg

Thanks.  Yes, this has the classic shape and higher crown of a Cenomanian morphotype of Ptychodus anonymous.  They typically max out at ~20 mm tooth width (TW). Higher up in the younger Turonian age in Wyoming, I found many with a regular TW closer to 16 to 20 mm.  Those I find in the Texas Eagle Ford average maybe 10 to 12 mm TW. My largest at 20 mm.  I suspect that your other teeth are mostly P. anonymous with maybe a few P. occidentalis thrown in (they have more finer ridges that branch outward toward the crown edges with a more rounded crown and no distinct margin or nearly flat crown with a little bump in the smaller posterior teeth).  P. anonymous posterior teeth are nearly flat with a ridge or two near the center only. 

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