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Bails

Shark Teeth ID please

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Bails

Hey all,

 

Could someone help me ID these two smaller teeth? Both were found in Charleston, South Carolina. Thanks so much!

FA708F43-661E-4164-B1AF-96B0857AE62B.jpeg

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JimB88

look like hemipristus..or posterior megs maybe; I dont know recent sharks all that well

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BellamyBlake
35 minutes ago, JimB88 said:

look like hemipristus..or posterior megs maybe; I dont know recent sharks all that well

I'm not sure what this is, but it's unlikely to be either of those. Hemis and Megs are both serrated, and I myself haven't seen a Meg that small.

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BellamyBlake

Could you kindly post up close shots of each? I'd like to see if the blade is serrated near the root by any chance.

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Brett Breakin' Rocks
1 hour ago, Bails said:

Hey all,

 

Could someone help me ID these two smaller teeth? Both were found in Charleston, South Carolina. Thanks so much!

 

Hi There,

 

These are most likely Alopias sp. (Thresher shark species) from that area. And these teeth are not easy to come across complete and are considered a rare find for collectors. Maybe Alopias Grandis (?)

 

Image from a local collector on the forum:

 

 

Cheers,

Brett

 

PS. And yes, better photos from directly above the teeth (both sides)  in better light would always be helpful in identifying the teeth. 

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BellamyBlake
1 hour ago, Brett Breakin' Rocks said:

Hi There,

 

These are most likely Alopias sp. (Thresher shark species) from that area. And these teeth are not easy to come across complete and are considered a rare find for collectors. Maybe Alopias Grandis (?)

 

Image from a local collector on the forum:

 

 

Cheers,

Brett

 

PS. And yes, better photos from directly above the teeth (both sides)  in better light would always be helpful in identifying the teeth. 

I think you hit the nail on the head. I didn't know Alopias could be had in South Carolina!

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Brett Breakin' Rocks
15 minutes ago, BellamyBlake said:

I think you hit the nail on the head. I didn't know Alopias could be had in South Carolina!

Yes, they are rare but they can be had if you put in the time. Most of my finds in Summerville were on the smaller side. 

01_Summerville_SC_Alopias_112017.thumb.jpg.da17012b41251399e4e9f06598fe88cb.jpg

03_Summerville_SC_AlopiasSp_031717.thumb.jpg.0537204339b43f3253c53a8b247a939b.jpg

 

 

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Praefectus

When I first saw these, I was split between Parotodus and Alopias. I'm not great at differentiating the two, but I am leaning more towards Alopias

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Hastalis

Agree with Praefectus, these two are most likely from the genus Alopias

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Bails

Thanks for the help and insight everyone! And apologies if the pictures aren’t perfect, I’m not the best with that. Attached are a couple more front and back. @BellamyBlake I don’t see any serrations on either tooth. 
 

87E9EB54-BB83-4276-AEDF-08DDE98649FB.jpeg

ED0AA668-7722-4118-B082-E1799546A660.png

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Bails

Also I found these 5 teeth at the same spot as the smaller 2. The top three were identified as Alopias grandis and I believe the bottom two are as well. So Alopias would make sense. I was thinking the lighter colored small one could be a benedini based on the root, but I’m still learning. 

58A6FBA9-8F2F-4947-9F3B-3D5AA6622BCB.jpeg

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bthemoose

Great finds! It looks like the tooth on the right (from the first two) may have a cusplet on at least one side. Would that make it Trigonotodus rather than Alopias?

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Bails

Thanks! Yeah it definitely does have a cusplet on the right side. 

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Familyroadtrip

I’d guess it’s an Alopias latidens, but I’m not positive that they’re in South Carolina.

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