Jump to content
Jgonzalez

Shark tooth ID help

Recommended Posts

Jgonzalez

Can anyone ID this shark tooth? Found in Charleston, SC.

89CE8A35-69EC-483F-8836-94DD030E3393.jpeg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Shellseeker

It is either a Megalodon OR a Great White. 

The almost complete lack of a bourlette would imply GW,  but the overall shape screams Megalodon.

 

I lean to Megalodon.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Jgonzalez

Thank you. That’s what I’m also thinking.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
BellamyBlake

I agree. It could be either, but Megs have been found without bourlettes. On the other hand, I've never seen a Great White shaped like this. I'd go with Meg. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Praefectus

+1 for meg. The roots on GWs tend to be more square. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Brett Breakin' Rocks
3 hours ago, Jgonzalez said:

Can anyone ID this shark tooth? Found in Charleston, SC.

 

2 hours ago, Shellseeker said:

but the overall shape screams Megalodon.

And just to muck with you some more .. in that part of South Carolina in my experience you are more likely to be holding an O. angustidens than a meg. Always with their sometimes -diminutive- cusps broken or worn away. If you hunt the creeks and the beach 9 times out of 10 I come home with broken angustidens. 

46840-31.thumb.jpg.9af200b3359091354b408fc17dc7e7f6.jpg

 

Cheers,

Brett

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Praefectus

@Jgonzalez Can you provide close-up pictures of the tooth? It would be helpful to be able to see if side cusps are (were) present on your tooth. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Familyroadtrip

Yeah... I agree that it’s a megatoothed shark, as for angy or meg, I can’t say.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Top Trilo
12 minutes ago, Praefectus said:

Can you provide close-up pictures of the tooth? It would be helpful to be able to see if side cusps are (were) present on your tooth. 

C7AEAB1D-7353-4BF7-8131-810FAF5021A7.jpeg.94e1e96bc207dff6a418cf829954baa8.jpeg

pulling a fossildude19, cropped brightened and contrasted.

 

I don’t think there were any other cusps

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Jgonzalez

3FC47067-2EDD-4FE2-B57A-6F281D9600C6.jpeg

BD5704C8-EF7C-444B-8E7D-880D5A20B073.jpeg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Brett Breakin' Rocks

@Jgonzalez Personally the shape and condition is something I would associate with an Angy with its ears clipped ... broken conveniently at the edges. Either way you have a mega-toothed shark tooth (Otodus sp.) My trouble in this area was always the abundance of O. angustidens and occam's razor. If I found something worn and beat up I was probably ... holding an Angy because they are so common. 

 

Image Credit: Sharkteeth.com

STSCA301e.jpg.890632e8188568dd8963da9c03c20513.jpg

 

 

I cried when I saw this one ... this is my own example. The cusps can be quite small. The morphology can vary so much. 01_Summerville_SC_Angustidens_112017.thumb.jpg.d393d3f13d2a6113628cf11d046e19f5.jpg

 

 

 

Cheers,

B

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Jgonzalez

Thank you for your insight. Very helpful! 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×