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What shark tooth is this?


Fossil_teenager

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Fossil_teenager

I found this tooth a few years back collecting at Stratford hall on the tour (it was a great day) and now that I look at it twice it doesn’t look like any of my makos that I ah e in my collection and believe me, I have a lot of makos. So that brings me to ask, what exactly is it? It’s about 1 1/4 inches long and I have lower makos but they don’t look like this. Here’s some photos I hope I can get to the bottom of this!

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Thomas.Dodson

It looks like a narrow form lower anterior tooth of Carcharodon hastalis.

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hemipristis
1 hour ago, Fossil_teenager said:

I found this tooth a few years back collecting at Stratford hall on the tour (it was a great day) and now that I look at it twice it doesn’t look like any of my makos that I ah e in my collection and believe me, I have a lot of makos. So that brings me to ask, what exactly is it? It’s about 1 1/4 inches long and I have lower makos but they don’t look like this. Here’s some photos I hope I can get to the bottom of this!

Remember that with regards to 'makos', there are a number of species in the Miocene-Pliocene, an additional one (at least) in the Eocene. Within each individual, tooth morphology differs between upper and lower jaw, as well as tooth position.  That is a lot of variation.

 

As someone who is a fan of 'mako' teeth (and have ~2000 from the mid-Atlantic area) I'm still learning, and still come across teeth periodically that have me scratching my head.

 

It is certainly a lower lateral tooth.  I suggest Isurus oxyrhinchus or I. hastalis.  The tooth is rather worn, which makes me unwilling to pick one right now.

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24 minutes ago, Thomas.Dodson said:

It looks like a narrow form lower anterior tooth of Carcharodon hastalis.

 

I agree.

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16 minutes ago, hemipristis said:

Remember that with regards to 'makos', there are a number of species in the Miocene-Pliocene, an additional one (at least) in the Eocene. Within each individual, tooth morphology differs between upper and lower jaw, as well as tooth position.  That is a lot of variation.

 

As someone who is a fan of 'mako' teeth (and have ~2000 from the mid-Atlantic area) I'm still learning, and still come across teeth periodically that have me scratching my head.

 

It is certainly a lower lateral tooth.  I suggest Isurus oxyrhinchus or I. hastalis.  The tooth is rather worn, which makes me unwilling to pick one right now.

 

It's a hastalis lower anterior.  It would have a slight S-curve to it if it were I. oxyrinchus.  It would be shorter and broader at the base if it were a lateral.

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