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Virginia Shell Hunt


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historianmichael

Last month my girlfriend and I took a trip to her parents' vacation house in North Carolina and on the drive down and the drive back we visited the Yorktown Battlefield and made a couple of fossil collecting stops in the Williamsburg area. These sites exposed the Late Miocene Eastover Formation (Cobham Bay Member) and Early Pliocene Yorktown Formation (Sunken Meadow Member). While we enjoyed weather in the low 50s during our stops on the drive down, we had to combat temperatures in the 30s and snow and frozen ground during our stops on the drive back. Though she did join me for some of it, to say the least my girlfriend spent most of the time on the drive back in the car while I collected in the field. I cannot thank @MikeR enough for his patience and assistance in identifying some of my finds. 

 

My favorite site we visited was actually our very first stop. We ended up visiting this site again on our drive back, so the photos are of our combined finds over both trips. The site is a shell bed full of Chesapecten middlesexensis and other cool shells dating to the Late Miocene. The fossils are preserved in life position so shells are simply stacked on each other, making this site just rich with fossil shells. On our walk back to our car we ended up speaking with a local property owner who said that he too has a shell bed on his property and has even found a whale vertebra there. Unfortunately no whale bones were found during our visits to this site.

 

Site.thumb.png.e370874d17dfd57e6c3f26650747eed6.png

 

We were fortunate to find quite a few unbroken Chesapecten middlesexensis, including eight that have both valves

1283148161_Chesapectenmiddlesexensis4.thumb.png.1c5fe1dbe5c4a6eb54ef51f2e3156a1c.png

 

I had a lot of fun searching for the largest and the smallest C. middlesexensis that I could find. Although I found one smaller, the smallest one that I was able to safely bring home is this one that is about 1.3 cm wide

503915483_Chesapectenmiddlesexensis1_3cm.png.3d78da869cd29182379e7c2289a4c16f.png

 

While the largest one that I found - and now proudly displayed in my house - is about 22cm wide! It is complete with both valves and has some barnacle pieces and a little bit of coral on the other side

1488017815_Chesapectenmiddlesexensis22cm.thumb.png.c6a60b07349819b47bd46d11c8ad5a39.png

 

Here is a photo of the excavation of this behemoth scallop

Excavation.png.d561b0f1b28ab69f954753268e3ab0a2.png

 

Some of my other favorite Chesapecten middlesexensis include these two shells covered with coral (Septastrea marylandica). The first one is my second largest find, measuring 20cm wide

356629482_Chesapectenmiddlesexensis20cm.thumb.png.150c74839f4fd38f65e02b0625614481.png 805676476_Chesapectenmiddlesexensis7.thumb.png.eea6492cfb7a063ee2801b28f46f5c54.png

1479103345_Chesapectenmiddlesexensis.thumb.png.c4d745f809292e4a03faf9a13cdb6f93.png 882963084_Chesapectenmiddlesexensis3.thumb.png.2d3615bd91f6b2987885b660e752f0f3.png

 

And this smaller one with barnacles (Balanus concavus) on it

23923460_Chesapectenmiddlesexensis6.thumb.png.9fe815a37909ff176d9cfecca61d92e2.png

 

Some of the colors on the shells are amazing, including this one that I call blue jean blue

1904814427_Chesapectenmiddlesexensis5.thumb.png.ae5056e6b484d434d6050d45e49543a5.png

 

Another highlight find was this partial Ecphora kochi covered with barnacles, coral, bryozoan and even a tiny tube worm

1807198996_Ecphorakochi.thumb.png.2a7772790d999daa23ad5092d1dae78e.png 84318746_Ecphorakochi3.thumb.png.5b20af2c2fe012e6111b1e7ec1fa0bfa.png

1320622576_Ecphorakochi2.thumb.png.08ddb7b75d02049623d029948cf9aac4.png 2076683406_Ecphorakochi4.thumb.png.6aac5b6f6bffd7f135913db61cf7304a.png

 

Here are some of my other finds:

 

Astarte cobhamensis

1228510406_Astartecobhamensis.thumb.png.5939092d44bb47a41d2ba8b4091285ed.png

 

Costaglycymeris mixoni (including one with both valves)

927771970_Costaglycymerismixoni.thumb.png.a3667b8ccebcc70003e8a4620cf58efa.png

 

Cyclocardia vautrotorum

1330422238_Cyclocardiavautrotorum.thumb.png.b2aa668459a58583bb54932ff4136415.png

 

Dallarca carolinensis

27157400_Dallarcacarolinensis.thumb.png.72bc92ce4d0cdf380918a83fe186e3a9.png

 

Dosinia blountana

1603053741_Dosiniablountana.thumb.png.336a3e8e317d1ae1780dd18cadb9436f.png

 

Isognomon (Hippochaeta) sp.

448725796_Isognomon(Hippochaeta)sp..thumb.png.993a23a76e9b97ff3497387c6cc5cb7d.png

 

Lirophora vredenburgi

532340078_Lirophoravredenburgi.thumb.png.8911bd066b9f1cc48483302e434611eb.png

 

Mansfieldostrea geraldjohnsoni (with both valves)

69465737_Mansfieldostreageraldjohnsoni.thumb.png.0da44692d1eaab2dc0751800c032354a.png

 

Marvacrassatella urbannaensis (with both valves)

1353113579_Marvacrassatellaurbannaensis.thumb.png.d034eb818c238bb667fd927f7d273bbe.png

 

Fragment of C. middlesexensis with Septastrea marylandica and Balanus concavus

40779222_Septastreamarylandica.thumb.png.2eef6f3fb64ef4aa481fd0cacc1e4272.png 603152753_Septastreamarylandica2.thumb.png.007918ecef4e42bd633e6b98df326587.png

 

Serpulorbis cf. granifera

489274811_Serpulorbiscf.granifera.thumb.png.9005086c570d2cbff06f317a2c75010b.png

 

Spisula bowlerensis

318297362_Spisulabowlerensis.thumb.png.562ba8fa2324cbdd8ed990bc0bbd76d6.png

 

Turritella subvariabilis

875597427_Turritellasubvariabilis.thumb.png.808ce4db2aac12eed7415a2b2e22281d.png

 

After cleaning my finds I decided to screen the excess material and search it for tiny gastropods and bivalves. Some of my effort is in the fossils above, but here are two of my smaller finds

 

Epitonium humphreysii

1797733706_Epitoniumhumphreysii.thumb.jpg.0cd04e548443a65547747732a785e12d.jpg

 

Parvilucina crenulata

1484362033_Parvilucinacrenulata2.thumb.jpg.e89736821990a4c7f8cc10e97a6afed2.jpg 1661773348_Parvilucinacrenulata.thumb.jpg.e9b624e257dcdc300d70a5f71636c18c.jpg

 

 

After a couple of hours driving around the Yorktown Battlefield National Historic Park, we made our second and last stop of the day - York River near the mouth of Indian Field Creek. This site is a well-known exposure of the Yorktown Formation, Sunken Meadow Member. When we arrived, I was astonished by the amount of shells just lying on the beach.

 

Site.thumb.png.77787c15f27250633be124b51cf224e5.png

 

Unfortunately almost all of the fossils on the beach were heavily water worn, so I decided to only keep a couple of things.

 

A shark tooth of a requiem shark (Carcharinus sp.)

1511372251_Carcharinussp..thumb.png.f4e875d37e6269f709b36d93482cdb1d.png

 

A broken and worn Ecphora gardnerae

172017667_Ecphoragardnerae.thumb.png.c04f60b69b46d79d193df268767b0c40.png

 

Three large coral chunks (Septastrea marylandica)

2116942885_Septastreamarylandica.thumb.png.d28fe9624199b700213d48e02769722f.png

 

Some bryozoan (Tretocycloecia sp.)

159107344_Tretocycloeciasp..thumb.png.e413acf6d25da5e193d221e10f86a4d1.png

 

 

We ended up spending about two weeks in North Carolina, and while we worked remotely from the house, it was a nice change of scenery. Our first stop on the drive back was a different exposure of the Eastover Formation, Cobham Bay Member. While we found some of the same fossils at this site, the micro fossils were much more abundant. I had a lot of fun screening and picking through the excess material from cleaning my finds. Here are some of our finds from this stop:

 

Chesapecten middlesexensis. By comparison to the ones above, the largest one we decided to keep from this site is only 3.3cm wide

1243145260_Chesapectenmiddlesexensis.thumb.png.80084c6c6d7651f12d2c2144b8505293.png

 

The number of isolated barnacles (Balanus concavus), including some barnacles on barnacles, was a real treat

1367143156_Balanusconcavus.thumb.png.c5b52e1d8ecd47f3ed0f03049fccd68b.png

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historianmichael

Mansfieldostrea geraldjohnsoni with a little barnacle on it

1429106397_Mansfieldostreageraldjohnsoni.thumb.png.cafff7ae4ed4d30d0426661b7b329eb7.png 1944526949_Mansfieldostreageraldjohnsoni2.thumb.png.474a161d5fe79a89d091c7a0bda3f708.png

 

Mariacolpus plebeia, including two encrusted with bryozoan

1801104129_Mariacolpusplebeia.thumb.png.ab0e373bcb3fe2804662eb8e7cac4a60.png

 

Mercenaria druidi

134006361_Mercenariadruidi.thumb.png.5c46f18ab922afb05f0fac19a1a4ef59.png

 

Dallarca carolinensis

109437208_Dallarcacarolinensis.thumb.png.0c0bf3e7886699a88ec1e8c2ea170109.png

 

Bryozoan colony

Bryozoan.thumb.png.f63b689ab6c420b80ab622b90067e86e.png

 

A tiny fish vertebra and spine

1263488142_FishVert.thumb.jpg.08b8da2497c222d90985277368471abf.jpg 758064222_FishSpine.thumb.jpg.71cb8ce7e1108eb8e5943e3f01a0d9b4.jpg

 

Fragments of Spantangoid Echinoids

2050310734_FragmentsofSpantangoidEchinoids2.thumb.jpg.8babbf1ece5c59579388db90016b9ec1.jpg 84080101_FragmentsofSpantangoidEchinoids3.thumb.jpg.0f36bc01d0609f84c6e6a14c462c16e9.jpg 1419390284_FragmentsofSpantangoidEchinoids.thumb.jpg.deaadfe61599663bdd77fecc1ce6624a.jpg

 

Cadulus thallus

1695985926_Cadulusthallus.thumb.png.5321898f7c6760d600e99f2b853f04ca.png

 

Dentalium attenuatum

868598596_Dentaliumattentuatum.thumb.png.66ef5e8e78ca47a3c6a3f85b384d4cf8.png

 

Dentalium sp. (these might be Dentalium attenuatum but they lacked the clear striations so I wasn't sure)

801312255_Dentaliumsp..thumb.png.486ce4154465b625fa7b2f08b6328e8b.png

 

Spisula bowlerensis

Spisula bowlerensis.png

 

Corbula cuneata

1379592514_Corbulacuneata.thumb.jpg.c0d437c4485fc489e46dc8ff1a42a13e.jpg

 

Corbula inaequalis

350565845_Corbulainaequalis2.thumb.jpg.85a76b11a0f91e22a083e02be92959a4.jpg 1395751818_Corbulainaequalis.thumb.jpg.52fdd6bb3172133d3c98256baa03f860.jpg

 

Astarte sp.

20988923_Astartesp.thumb.jpg.e98d06763226ce6e94815c5bd3002c48.jpg

 

Parvilucina crenulata

1743069360_Parvilucinacrenulata.thumb.jpg.321d3bdaf327a840ad6729a02a22d8ef.jpg 

 

Nucula proxima

20173209_Nuculaproxima.thumb.jpg.d6815d6989b8d480967636e20da5d3c0.jpg

 

Nucula sinaria

708737230_Nuculasinaria.thumb.jpg.b3c93453976d5215bde04bf670806462.jpg 

 

Nuculana acuta

596283905_Nuculanaacuta.thumb.jpg.39de5358b2b543cac21bf3cd586d4a6d.jpg

 

Tellina declivis

1229973874_Tellinadeclivis.thumb.jpg.0dcc942838f6e309b07f28df805e5515.jpg

 

Tellina producta

236396663_Tellinaproducta2.thumb.jpg.c02a3fe516122c03e98a370dbf8e2ced.jpg 2051325139_Tellinaproducta.thumb.jpg.06939c987124d21bb0b8bfcb114bab14.jpg

 

Yoldia laevis

1954996462_Yoldialaevis.thumb.jpg.e49b1caf2583690cc6eb9a8f4c27f78b.jpg 1187342200_Yoldialaevis2.thumb.jpg.96e93a7d7313ef8fb823d34f7fecd9b7.jpg

 

Calliostoma virginicum

2053319137_Calliostomavirginicum.thumb.jpg.a0026c544d961c73647b51bf3784a846.jpg

 

Drillia incilifera var. angulata n. var.

985781107_Drilliainciliferavarangulatanvar.thumb.jpg.bba2b32273b732f8ede66fb497bbb89b.jpg

 

Drillia incilifera

1385630438_Drilliaincilifera.thumb.jpg.19b0e0ae1e6572525d7cdab5854ee3eb.jpg

 

Drillia limatula

1569878612_Drillialimatula.thumb.jpg.07ac9c5b0b11cf751685cbd53b7c3b34.jpg

 

 

After a return visit to the Eastover Formation site that we visited on our drive down, we stopped by a creek and nearby road cut that I had read exposes the Yorktown Formation, Sunken Meadow Member. As soon as I arrived at the site, I noticed fragments of large Chesapecten jeffersonius shells in an adjacent drainage ditch. I was a little nervous that the information I read was old, but as soon as I saw that, I knew I was in the right spot.

 

Site.thumb.png.431f8f464554f1ebefaf83237be3d883.png

 

Here are the Chesapecten jeffersonius that we collected

1936468630_Chesapectenjeffersonius2.thumb.png.3aa1411f659bbd5b94a6e4705f77bbb0.png

 

The largest one we found measures 17.5 wide, so big but not as big as they can get

1735685126_Chesapectenjeffersonius3.thumb.png.538d22bc2126d3524a9ed3a82fe80c57.png

 

The smallest are about the size of your finger pad

2097770800_Chesapectenjeffersonius2.jpg.393c4447d0bd84b4fb98c66a13d939aa.jpg 1159716316_Chesapectenjeffersonius.thumb.jpg.8416896b426065e37c70d524fdcf5321.jpg

 

We found two that have both valves

1943144583_Chesapectenjeffersonius4.thumb.png.388be174316918a7f468f4eab262b2f2.png 295737328_Chesapectenjeffersonius5.thumb.png.dbe0f0114ad13ea1cfcbc3a5f234e5ae.png

 

I thought the barnacle scars on these C. jeffersonius were really cool.

1451683176_Chesapectenjeffersonius6.thumb.png.0a2368633594d2cb3ebc4653bc32523e.png 1091592138_Chesapectenjeffersonius7.thumb.png.6e9007f165410000a4e741c8bcf87363.png

 

They look like the famous drawing of C. jeffersonius in "Historiae Conchyliorum, Liber III" by Martin Lister, published in 1687

1263749858_ScreenShot2021-02-28at8_37_29PM.png.cf108f81e84ec7a5365602e85eb50043.png

 

Here are some of our other finds:

 

Immature Placopecten clintonius

1367537206_Placopectenclintonius.thumb.jpg.2d659cc36dbbb8e57128fa572d5aa483.jpg

 

Mansfieldostrea compressirorostra, including one with a surprise barnacle on the underside 

2088767011_Mansfieldostreacompressirostra.thumb.png.e00a7faf27ec2154043ff8fe9e6d9122.png 1300191717_Mansfieldostreacompressirostra2.thumb.png.5e9150463157f7c80aaeb1d8c36e6ab7.png

 

Mercenaria sp., including this one with both valves and these two immature venus clams

1985930795_Mercenariasp.2.thumb.png.3d7d1f999db9a6b9d61f1962a6b1f198.png 794907554_Mercenariasp..thumb.png.b72dfb71f2bc59f9cb4417a6ad4027aa.png1750988774_Mercenariasp.3.thumb.jpg.d2d3b33fa1688b72cdda6b2f3aabf9ba.jpg 1302569949_Mercenariasp.4.thumb.jpg.e4e4f8c7166dcc736f3ca9d7839932b8.jpg

 

Kuphus fistula

1215174553_Kuphusfistula.thumb.png.934ca1bcfb185e2ca4d31ff6fbc8ab77.png

 

Cadulus thallum

1574988185_Cadulusthallus.thumb.png.65af6c65e03e22a19eae3528f8a75a50.png

 

Dentalium attenuatum

204898839_Dentaliumattenuatum.thumb.png.6f906eedab32d7f625843aab430ddca8.png

 

Costaglycymeris subovata

1944803524_Costaglycymerissubovata.thumb.png.64d345739c63800f775aa1bc0cba42bc.png


Eucrassatella virginica

234805174_Eucrassatellavirginica.thumb.png.2ee0f4f9db5d7be803c5080c38b929b2.png

 

Dosinia acetabulum

166556964_Dosiniaacetabulum.thumb.png.279d21452b3812d485328de7b0b8bc1f.png

 

Macoma virginiana

360097690_Macomavirginiana2.thumb.jpg.788ff2bd9d4d3e8fd74166de223e9b7c.jpg 2104743071_Macomavirginiana3.thumb.jpg.d1f0ec63c5bfe74bbbac27f7344b9fa4.jpg317253952_Macomavirginiana4.thumb.jpg.41ba4b7769af07f7f96daf554e9e6a00.jpg 641912175_Macomavirginiana.thumb.jpg.6cd95cd66c50b06094aab1ebd12b12bb.jpg

 

Stewartia anodonta

295144284_Stewartiaanodonta.thumb.png.99e181b8fe93f3efc9457d3dae9eb089.png

 

Spisula confraga

1973478243_Spisulaconfraga.thumb.png.7584002d49c6ddd44923025ab31889a2.png

 

Tellina declivis

1828227330_Tellinadeclivis.thumb.jpg.bb88aaa48e1dacaaf95a6a47e08c41b1.jpg

 

I found quite a few of these Cyclocardia granulata but I was really awed by how these two looked under my microscope  

364268138_Cyclocardiagranulata2.thumb.jpg.3f9d70bb071fa11aff573a08c8a81a90.jpg 131715413_Cyclocardiagranulata.thumb.jpg.6b98db4123b5ad54067000db2e18025c.jpg
 

Astarte coheni

1825670586_Astartecoheni.thumb.png.9f82eb2410238dc6616e9ab862646fe7.png

 

Astarte exaltata

1153133184_Astarteexaltata.thumb.png.40eb32ecbeca381a056dd17051f3814d.png

 

Astarte undulata

1805068232_Astarteundulata.thumb.png.3a2615f209a31a8ef9c4fbbf26ae56f3.png

 

Astarte undulata vaginulata

1409340320_Astarteundulatavaginulata.thumb.png.91e0e66829d9c5a641fdaf962f2ba15a.png

 

Bostrycapulus aculeata ponderosa

2000933023_Bostrycapulusaculeataponderosa.thumb.png.5c88f266f6bdb0a6497bb69fb1742cde.png

 

Bostrycapulus aculeatus aculeatus

486265903_Bostrycapulusaculeatusaculeatus.thumb.png.a740b4734b1968381b8e16e563f40411.png

 

Chama congregata

132640972_Chamacongregata.thumb.png.0a84ac7009309b0c72b2c0d61402ff1e.png

 

Including these immature Chama congregata

526382022_Chamacongregata2.thumb.jpg.af6dc50392df1a90961e822f5bdcde52.jpg 2097342479_Chamacongregata3.thumb.jpg.209105c5840c0a376aa7cdf4a9e9530a.jpg 1922120598_Chamacongregata.thumb.jpg.2dc33f9d7d080680f2c2376548866b49.jpg

 

Parvilucina crenulata

1453564847_Parvilucinacrenulata2.thumb.jpg.1cb25cb986c764394351f2f673dc81f2.jpg 2109181968_Parvilucinacrenulata4.thumb.jpg.8fc1236e725a95ab832d6dfe96de2382.jpg 1838060301_Parvilucinacrenulata.thumb.jpg.690e96544426e6384f4231d6a576b0c0.jpg

 

Clinocardium acutilaqueatum

166067021_Clinocardiumacutilaqueatum.thumb.jpg.b69c2dee63858ba034e743888bafdb5f.jpg

 

Hiatella arctica

142085919_Hiatellaarctica3.thumb.jpg.dfbfff49e95d09dfe13757f7b4cfd687.jpg  243925299_Hiatellaarctica4.thumb.jpg.2de9b1b4aa7c194e0374a32911bddcb5.jpg  

 

Corbula inaequalis

1713572787_Corbulainaequalis.thumb.jpg.65cd428650ec474c661a989d4b7041b4.jpg

 

Corbula cuneata

1153298935_Corbulacuneata.thumb.jpg.85f16655f388ed6e0fa516e50e604fb9.jpg 1750794153_Corbulacuneata2.thumb.jpg.664ffdb3923928099a6a0dc6d2c52dcc.jpg

 

Diodora redimicula

1691809853_Diodoraredimicula.thumb.png.860ab9e359917e60d890d014d372a055.png

 

Acteocina myrmecoon

240141456_Acteocinamyrmecoon.thumb.jpg.2e32a0694fc575d62c30cab7dcea2ed7.jpg

 

Boreotrophon tetricus
170077306_Boreotrophontetricus.thumb.jpg.91543c6cad303228a107fe817e9a6ad1.jpg 1170956768_Boreotrophontetricus2.thumb.jpg.cc8354dbe5c91d8acca390c1de9e355a.jpg

 

Carinodrillia smithfieldensis

340894725_Carinodrilliasmithfieldensis.thumb.jpg.9cabbef11130fd66c3b144db19a82d22.jpg

 

Dentimargo aureocincta

1893379854_Dentimargoaureocincta.thumb.jpg.53c9f68239812431cc0600aba570492a.jpg

 

Euspira interna, including some tiny ones

2146569952_Euspirainterna.thumb.png.2a21be09dfda869ee88192f99156b273.png 1872409139_Euspirainterna2.thumb.jpg.c78910d1387f3d22ab34615336c12b35.jpg

 

Fusinus propeparilis

1153430043_Fusinuspropeparilis.thumb.png.22af741e48133b8637009dd2db8dfc06.png

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historianmichael

Lyrosoma sulcosa multicostata

36211435_Lyrosomasulcosamulticostata.thumb.png.5501b3aab747159a483846701ce8abb9.png

 

A couple tiny unidentified Neogastropoda

1032815858_Neogastropoda2.thumb.jpg.09494d4dfb49e0ad770eb68ace711853.jpg Neogastropoda.thumb.jpg.666c3dead0c462dafa6fd47ec00ad123.jpg

 

Turritella bipertita

1331339567_Turritellabipertita.thumb.png.21e2871bf2fa0d6f60129f16cefa6994.png

 

Volvulella cylindra

2022559023_Volvulellacylindra.thumb.jpg.4cbb58e95cbbaef58a31943bde12d3b4.jpg

 

 

On the walk back to the car I noticed a couple of loose fossils at the base of the nearby road cut. They were caked in dirt so I ended up bringing them home to clean them up. After a quick rinse, I discovered that the scallop I picked up was in fact Chesapecten madisonius of the the Late Pliocene Yorktown Formation, Rushmere Member. Since I visited the site expecting to only collect from the Sunken Meadow Member, it was very cool to get to sample another exposure. My finds from here are few because I didn't do much exploring.

 

Chesapecten madisonius

702146656_Chesapectenmadisonius.thumb.png.3814f81ed3ec02b612b0f2675780eb9c.png

 

Ostrea sculpturata

2099204000_Ostreasculpturata.thumb.png.2186473aa49d38ee0fed763f223c6bc8.png

 

Balanus concavus

881329639_Balanusconcavus.thumb.png.e488bed23895471762b9081aaecaefec.png 365690636_Balanusconcavus2.thumb.png.52880c90ce9e6b620092260edf109634.png 1621802744_Balanusconcavus3.thumb.png.dfdc0aba128a9c64badcaec3f795dee7.png

 

You can kinda see it in the photo above, but when I looked at the last one under my microscope, I discovered several awesome bryozoa on it

 

Possibly Theonoa glomerata n. sp.

1479097243_Bryozoan4.thumb.jpg.08256c04d61e0c928f9ef8ff8a6a41de.jpg 1836527025_Bryozoan5.thumb.jpg.76b578c5ac83282bc23faf4b13510e9c.jpg

1331518308_Bryozoan8.thumb.jpg.38bbc058d63c258328359daf509fa30a.jpg 671819262_Bryozoan7.thumb.jpg.0a329cd9b33b3ac6f13da7a4dc8a772e.jpg

 

An unidentified bryozoan

87102077_Bryozoan3.thumb.jpg.7dfd85ff853124c52e3adddc80f6e8dc.jpg 382110817_Bryozoan2.thumb.jpg.fb77a0b869a04be7979f884a6c5ebf22.jpg

 

Another unidentified bryozoan

1755674579_Bryozoan1.thumb.jpg.21dce206268ea59ca2868b79995eb7a1.jpg

 

 

If you made it this far, I want to thank you for reading. I know that I have probably overwhelmed you with finds and photos. It was a great trip and I am excited to soon get back to explore some other sites in the area. Hopefully I got correct the identification on most of these finds and that this post can be used as a tool for others seeking to identify their finds from the Eastover and Yorktown Formations. Enjoy the rest of your weekend!

 

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aplomado

Oh, that looks like fossil heaven!  :thumbsu:

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traveltip1

Awesome finds. I like the predation boring holes in some of the bivalves.

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fossilizator

:ojealousyjealousyjealousyjeal...

no words only emotions

p.s. very good place for rest:hammer01:

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