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Timmy

I Think I Found A Fossilized/crystallized Honeycomb Thing

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Timmy

I found this while walking on the shores of Lake Michigan in Wisconsin. What is this?

To me it looks like some kind of wasp/bee nest that's fossilized with crystals. In the pictures you can't see this thing sparkle, but it seriously sparkles like crazy. Also, one side clearly has hexagon shapes.

I doubt if I lick it, I'll taste something sweet. I read online that fossilized honeycombs are rarer than meteorites. Is this true?

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Roz

It's coral.... Very beautiful

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Roz

Looks like colonial coral.

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PaleoRon

Nice coral. Most of the coral from up that way that I have seen is a shade of gray.

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Roz

Oh, just found this, the colonial coral found there is called something else.. pretty cool

here

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Auspex

The State Fossil of Michigan :)

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fossil fury

Sparkle or not it's a beaut. :wub:

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Scarodactyl

I'd guess genus Favosites, based on both the side and top views, though of course I'm no expert.

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Timmy

Hey guys I found this same fossil on a YouTube video

Go to 4:31 in the video.

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Harry Pristis

Here's a coral colony in cross-section for comparison:

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JimB88

Coral in chert is always neat. You have a good specimen.

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Gaffer2

I found this fossil 45 years ago, in a large creek bed in western up-state NY. I thought it was a fossilized honeycomb at age 8, but after seeing pics and video on this topic, I think it's probably a type of coral. So, can people give me their opinions of what this actually is. if possible age, type, or anything else you think I'd want to know about it? It weights eight pounds, measures approx. 8" long, 6.5" deep, and 5" high. Thanks all.

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Carl

Yep - that sure looks like a favositid coral, too, Gaffer2. And as for the rarity of fossil honeycombs, they are MUCH rarer than meteorites! In fact, I know of a SINGLE example:

From Batu Caves, Malaysia. It is believed to be Pleistocene in age, or older, and is identified as belonging to the genus Apis, which includes all of todays honeybees. The wax structure has been replicated in calcite.

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Edited by Carl

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lissa318

Nice piece of coral! Love the color! :)

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Rockwood

Yep - that sure looks like a favositid coral, too, Gaffer2. And as for the rarity of fossil honeycombs, they are MUCH rarer than meteorites! In fact, I know of a SINGLE example:

From Batu Caves, Malaysia. It is believed to be Pleistocene in age, or older, and is identified as belonging to the genus Apis, which includes all of todays honeybees. The wax structure has been replicated in calcite.

Just a pedantic here :) Isn't this technically an ichnofossil ?

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bethk

Favosite coral, known also as "Honeycomb coral", for obvious reasons. Quite common in the Paleozoic strata around the Great Lakes. Very nice!

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Herb

Favosite coral, known also as "Honeycomb coral", for obvious reasons. Quite common in the Paleozoic strata around the Great Lakes. Very nice!

true. nice coral.

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Carl

Absolutely an ichnofossil! Pedantry always welcome!

Just a pedantic here :) Isn't this technically an ichnofossil ?

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