Jump to content


Photo

Illinois


7 replies to this topic

#1 Kaspar825

Kaspar825

    Newbie

  • New Members
  • Pip
  • 7 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Illinois

Posted 09 June 2010 - 09:34 AM

Hey guys just thought i want to try hunting a couple days ago can you tell me some spots in illinois. Around Chicago would be better but i could go to other places. Thanks

#2 Kaspar825

Kaspar825

    Newbie

  • New Members
  • Pip
  • 7 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Illinois

Posted 09 June 2010 - 10:03 AM

And also what should i bring?

#3 Fossildude19

Fossildude19

    MOTM - 06/11 - Veteran Shale Splitter

  • Regular Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 8,105 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Connecticut, United States. Lower Jurassic, Shuttle Meadow & East Berlin FMs

Awards

 

Posted 09 June 2010 - 10:51 AM

Hello Kaspar825,

Here is a list of places to go:

http://www.fossilsit...m/STATES/IL.HTM

Keep in mind, much of the info on the list is OLD, and sites may be off limits or no longer there.:blink:

As to what to bring,... Hammer, chisels, backpack, water, bug spray, first aid kit, sledge hammer. You may add or detract from the list as necessary.

There are older posts - if you search the forum, that cover this topic.

Example: http://www.thefossil...=1

Good luck, be safe, and don't forget to report back! ;)

We wanna see what you find! :D

Edited by Fossildude19, 09 June 2010 - 10:57 AM.

Tim
_______________________________________________________
********************

"In every walk with nature one receives far more than he seeks."
John Muir  
          ~    ~    ~    ~      ><))))(*>


#4 JimB88

JimB88

    Member of the Month Jan. 2012

  • Regular Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 2,168 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Tennessee

Awards

 

Posted 09 June 2010 - 11:01 AM

Im from that area, If you look in the Illinois section of fossil locales Ive listed some places around Rockford and South Beloit. They're Ordovician in age. Braidwood really isn't that far from Chicago (I used to drive there from South Beloit!) As I'm sure you've heard you can find some ironstone concretions there. If your adventurous (and own a bullet proof vest ;) ) You could try the Silurian age formation in <gulp> Blue Island (I take no responsibility for anything that may happen to you there! ;) ) Between Racine and Milwaukee there are also Silurian aged deposits.

#5 Matt Kapraun

Matt Kapraun

    Advanced Member

  • Regular Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 39 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Harvard, IL

Posted 10 June 2010 - 08:18 AM

Jim B88 good info, the sad thing is in this area of northern illinois there are rock quaries that have fossils in them, but its really hard to get permission due to the liability. For braidwood you need a boat and need to know what islands on the lake to go to and have an idea on what your looking for in concretions. There is a huge quarry in by chicago and i mean huge i dont remember the name of it, but i would love to get in there, i believe its off 290? I would say your best bet is to join a club called esconi i think they do some field trips to braidwood and are able to get into some quarries.
B.A. in Geology Augustana College 2003
Full time taxidermist since 2004

#6 JimB88

JimB88

    Member of the Month Jan. 2012

  • Regular Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 2,168 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Tennessee

Awards

 

Posted 10 June 2010 - 09:23 AM

Jim B88 good info, the sad thing is in this area of northern illinois there are rock quaries that have fossils in them, but its really hard to get permission due to the liability. For braidwood you need a boat and need to know what islands on the lake to go to and have an idea on what your looking for in concretions. There is a huge quarry in by chicago and i mean huge i dont remember the name of it, but i would love to get in there, i believe its off 290? I would say your best bet is to join a club called esconi i think they do some field trips to braidwood and are able to get into some quarries.

I believe thats the Vulcan quarry (my dad worked there.)
Actually I found most of my concretions in areas outside of Braidwood. I had only been to the islands once. Theres also a state park in Mazon that you can collect at (the visitor center shows some of the concretions from there.) I used to walk along the rail lines looking for outcrops that the concretions weather out of with some success.

#7 ashcraft

ashcraft

    Advanced Member

  • Regular Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,563 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Southeast Missouri

Posted 10 June 2010 - 11:46 AM

Go South Young Man. Southern Illinois has a plethora of Mississippian material, particularly crinoids. Head down I-57 to the Anna exit.

http://www.lakeneosh...t/88/index.html

Brent Ashcraft

Edited by ashcraft, 10 June 2010 - 11:50 AM.

ashcraft, brent allen

#8 ArmyRockHound

ArmyRockHound

    Newbie

  • New Members
  • Pip
  • 1 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Illinois

Posted 17 June 2010 - 11:09 AM

Greetings, all. I'm new to the site but a long-time fossil nut. I live in the Chicago area and wanted to chime in about Braidwood -- I've been collecting there just three times, all in the past two years, including yesterday. I've always been on foot and never used a boat. Over those three trips, I've found *hundreds* of opened and unopened concretions (yesterday's haul included around 100 unopened -- I stopped counting while sorting). The quality and variety of the specimens has been impressive. I've found too many jellies to count, a number of fish (including one fearsome-looking little fellow about the size of a guppy, which preserved so well (3D) that you can count his scales and the number of rays in his fins), shrimp, insects, clams, plants, etc. I'll post some pics when I get some better equipment.

My point is that Braidwood is most definitely not played out for collecting on foot if you're willing to do some work and get a little dirty. There are two strategies I'd recommend that have proven to be very productive. First, walk the roads around the Mazonia South Unit. The roads look like crushed limestone, but there's only a thin layer of limestone over the rough-graded soil, which is loaded with concretions. Traffic and weathering will bring them to the surface where they will be lying in plain sight, just waiting to be picked up. (Hint: don't wear sunglasses, the color is very distinctive and with a little practice, they pop right out of the background). Yesterday, I parked at the Monster Lake car park and started to walk the shoulders of the road. Not 50 yards from the entrance to the lot, I saw a curved piece of ironstone about an inch long sticking up from the ground. A bit of careful digging revealed a complete half-concretion (and the pieces of the other half) more than six inches across, by far the largest I've ever found. I think it's a jelly, but I'll post a pic sometime and solicit the wisdom of those more experienced than I.

The other method I've used is to hill-climb. Find a hill in the public-use areas, climb it and look on the sides where the soil is weathered out from under the trees. You will almost certainly find specimens. The downside is that it takes a lot of work to collect that way, but I enjoy hill scrambling, so it's fine by me. Safety tip: be careful of the bugs. The area is loaded with ticks, but some good repellent and a one-piece (like a mechanic's suit) pretty much make them a non-issue.

Good luck and happy hunting!

Mark



Reply to this topic



  


0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users