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Atomic Rat

My Coprolite Collection

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I will try to add info for the coprolites based on what I was told when I purchased them or found them.

Various coprolites from Australia. The longest one is 7".

post-4530-069376000 1291561219_thumb.jpg

Clam shell coprolite.

post-4530-067322300 1291561277_thumb.jpg

Fish coprolite from Florida, near Peace River.

post-4530-059187700 1291561465_thumb.jpg

Mammal coprolite.

post-4530-071116300 1291561494_thumb.jpg

Megalodon coprolite. From top, fish coprolite, mosasaur coprolite, shark coprolite, megalodon coprolite's black appearance may be from consuming belemnites.

post-4530-092694900 1291561538_thumb.jpg

Close up of megalodon coprolite. Notice big bite mark in far right coprolite. The redish tint is due to agatizing process of the coprolite.

post-4530-006687000 1291561582_thumb.jpg

Nodule coprolite. Unknown species. Coprolite fell out when the nodule was cracked open. I do not know where the previous owner found it.

post-4530-019522600 1291561699_thumb.jpg

Sloth coprolite, Madagascar.

post-4530-079025700 1291561901_thumb.jpg

Turtle coprolites. A bone is protruding from the coprolite at left.

post-4530-044148300 1291561965_thumb.jpg

Various coprolites.

post-4530-024571300 1291562001_thumb.jpg

I have more coming and will post pictures when they arrive.

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These are pretty cool!

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I started collecting coprolites since it was so hard to collect all the dinosaurs. This way, I may have all of the series? :rolleyes:

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I've never seen a Megalodon Coprolite before. I like them, they ook pretty neat :)

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It may not be apparent in the photos but the megalodon coprolites are almost agatized. I am going to slice one in half like a sand which to see what bones are inside and then polish the slices. I haven't decided which one yet. I want a few more samples before I decide. I have seen these sold as crocodile coprolites but I have seen crocodile snarge agates and I am trying to get a few to show the difference.

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It is not possible to distinguish a megalodon coprolite from that of another large extinct shark species. Also, shark coprolites have a shape and contours determined by the valve they passed through. The shape can look like a spiral (tightly or loosely coiled) or a scroll. If a coprolite is later worn smooth, it may be impossible to distinguish them from waterworn rocks.

The specimen from Madagascar is not from a sloth because sloths have only lived in the Americas.

I saw a reference title recently that said some apparent coprolites are actually just iron concretions. I thought I had written it in my notes but can't find it.

I will try to add info for the coprolites based on what I was told when I purchased them or found them.

Various coprolites from Australia. The longest one is 7".

post-4530-069376000 1291561219_thumb.jpg

Clam shell coprolite.

post-4530-067322300 1291561277_thumb.jpg

Fish coprolite from Florida, near Peace River.

post-4530-059187700 1291561465_thumb.jpg

Mammal coprolite.

post-4530-071116300 1291561494_thumb.jpg

Megalodon coprolite. From top, fish coprolite, mosasaur coprolite, shark coprolite, megalodon coprolite's black appearance may be from consuming belemnites.

post-4530-092694900 1291561538_thumb.jpg

Close up of megalodon coprolite. Notice big bite mark in far right coprolite. The redish tint is due to agatizing process of the coprolite.

post-4530-006687000 1291561582_thumb.jpg

Nodule coprolite. Unknown species. Coprolite fell out when the nodule was cracked open. I do not know where the previous owner found it.

post-4530-019522600 1291561699_thumb.jpg

Sloth coprolite, Madagascar.

post-4530-079025700 1291561901_thumb.jpg

Turtle coprolites. A bone is protruding from the coprolite at left.

post-4530-044148300 1291561965_thumb.jpg

Various coprolites.

post-4530-024571300 1291562001_thumb.jpg

I have more coming and will post pictures when they arrive.

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Atomic Rat... Very nice... I can see you probably do do have the full set... I find things we think are regurgitates from the 'other end'... of whatever made them...

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It is not possible to distinguish a megalodon coprolite from that of another large extinct shark species. Also, shark coprolites have a shape and contours determined by the valve they passed through. The shape can look like a spiral (tightly or loosely coiled) or a scroll. If a coprolite is later worn smooth, it may be impossible to distinguish them from waterworn rocks.

The specimen from Madagascar is not from a sloth because sloths have only lived in the Americas.

I saw a reference title recently that said some apparent coprolites are actually just iron concretions. I thought I had written it in my notes but can't find it.

I read an article about the concretions. Good point about the sloth, I had not considered that--it is probably turtle poop instead, oh, well, live and learn. Thank you for bringing that to my attention. Not all coprolites are concretions, though some concretions appear to be coprolites. The 'proof' would be an abundance of phosphates in the material, which is why coprolites were once mined for fertilizer. The sphincter pinch often points to the rock being a coprolite. then there are the huge chunks of dino poop that are agates.

The megalodon coprolites are determined by the presence of megalodon fossils, they also are of the same area as the fossils. This is why I want to cut one open to determine what it ate and that can perhaps tell me if it is indeed at least from some kind of large shark. Not all sea going animals will leave coprolites behind because they dissolve rapidly in salt water. I have seen a coprolite on the web showing teeth marks by a megalodon that did attack a giant crocodile. Perhaps these coprolites are from giant crocodiles after all instead of megalodons? I'll have to keep studying.

Edited by Atomic Rat

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Like the Meg. Poooo saw this one and had to have it. Had more fun putting it in someones hand and asking what they think this is and watching their expression.--Tom

post-3940-032041200 1291649180_thumb.jpg

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There was a Croc coprolite found in the Calvert Fm. (zone 11, at Parker's Creek) that was full of bird feathers; I think Wetmore described it?

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Also, shark coprolites have a shape and contours determined by the valve they passed through. The shape can look like a spiral (tightly or loosely coiled) or a scroll

I am OK with you. The bowel of the sharks is in the shape of Archimedes' screw. That is why the shark coprolites are as "wound"("tangled up". I am not sure that your fossils are shark coprolites.

Coco

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I'll state without proof or scientific justification that some of those look to me like coprolites, others don't have "organic shapes" that coincide with 40 years of my own observations.....in fact some look more like kidney stones than coprolites! J/K I think some are concretions as stated above.

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Fossil hunting and coprolite hunting are on-going lessons for me, always a new learning experience, like meteorite hunting. Always something new I did not know before. You guys rock!

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This is one of my favorite coprolites, or snarge agate: I call it the 'Sphincter Ring of Death.'

post-4530-039780900 1291660819_thumb.jpg

I believe, jokingly, that dinosaurs did not die from asteroid impact but from constipation judging from the looks of that coprolite!

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This is one of my favorite coprolites...: I call it the 'Sphincter Ring of Death.'

OOF!

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Never thought of specializing a collection in poop. Certainly is a great conversation starter.

Clemsonskulls

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Good thing their fossilized! :lol:

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Another small remark: M. megalodon eating belemnites? Does not compute...

Belemnites were already extinct quite some time when megalodon roamed the oceans.

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Looks like a great collection. :) Always wanted a nice red agatized piece of dino poo and a meg coprolite :wub:

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Another small remark: M. megalodon eating belemnites? Does not compute...

Belemnites were already extinct quite some time when megalodon roamed the oceans.

See, I learn something new everyday! :blink:

I'm not good on dates so i depend, perhaps too much, on what I read as a description of poop. Either way, they be big pieces of snarge! I'll get one sawn in half and post what it looks like. I had been also thinking that such a large animal would need much more than belemnites to survive anyway. Could this be whale poop, gray agates?

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It is not possible to distinguish a megalodon coprolite from that of another large extinct shark species. Also, shark coprolites have a shape and contours determined by the valve they passed through. The shape can look like a spiral (tightly or loosely coiled) or a scroll. If a coprolite is later worn smooth, it may be impossible to distinguish them from waterworn rocks.

The specimen from Madagascar is not from a sloth because sloths have only lived in the Americas.

I saw a reference title recently that said some apparent coprolites are actually just iron concretions. I thought I had written it in my notes but can't find it.

The dealer may have been referring to the sloth lemur:

http://bork.hampshire.edu/~josiah/EVANarticle.pdf

I'm still checking.

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YAY POOOOOOOOOOOOOP! Nice to know others are fascinated with poop fossils, nice collection!

I have a dino dungy myself! :D

post-1900-0-74467100-1292260574_thumb.jpg

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Collecting snarge agates is so much fun! How can a person collect the fossilized remains of a Jurassic road-apple and not have fun?

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Collecting snarge agates is so much fun! How can a person collect the fossilized remains of a Jurassic road-apple and not have fun?

I don't know? :D Just won a Jurassic 9 pounder off ebay that is sliced and polished on one side and raw around the edges :D

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