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drujd

I Have No Idea...

13 posts in this topic

This one has been bugging me for for some time now. It's from a Miocene sandbank (White Rock River, South Canterbury NZ), filled with shells (bivalves, gastropods, tusk shells) and the occasional shark tooth, and fish and bird bones. I intially thought it might be the internal cast of something but I'm guessing I'm way off (as usual).

Thanks in advance,

Daniel

(approx. 16mm)

post-6183-0-87501100-1354679488_thumb.jpg

Edited by drujd

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Hi Daniel it may be a section of a fossil tube worm burrow . this is also just a guess. Dave

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Hi Dave, I did wonder if it was something like that. The protruding end seems to run through the middle, a cast within a cast?

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You might want to check it with a magnet just to rule out that it's concretion on a modern piece of iron.

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Hi,

All the iron stones don't react with a magnet. For example, pyrite and marcassite are not attracted by a magnet.

Coco

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A nail would though :)

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Rockwood, all the sorts of nails aren't attracted by a magnet ! They are iron nails, brass nails, stainless nails, steel nails etc.... Try with all those of them an you will see that few of them PERHAPS react to a magnet !

For information, the magnetite (oxides of iron : Fe2+ Fe23+ O4 ) is attracted by a magnet only when it is crystallized. If it is found in the amorphous state, it will not attract the magnet.

It is a false idea to believe that any iron stone attracts a magnet, quite as to think that all the meteorites would be also attracted by a magnet. :);)

Coco

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All good information, but I still think it could be a nail or a piece of wire.

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Sorry, sandbank was probably the wrong term. I guess it's more of a low cliff with several exposed shell beds, it's quite soft and the shells can be dug out fairly easily. This thing was sieved out from the extracted sand so I doubt it's of modern origin.

And after double checking, it doesn't appear to be metal.

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I second the burrow ID.

The lighter color material is interesting though because it almost looks like it could be a burrow itself, or it may just be cemented around the actual burrow. Is the lighter material the same color/texture as the rock you found it in? I'm wondering if the dark material was the escape trace from the original burrow being infilled. Just a curious thought.

:zzzzscratchchin:

Edited by evren

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It's from the Southburn Sand Formation and has been described as silty unlithified sandstone, dark grey in colour.

I think I read somewhere about iron sand(?) nodules being found in the sand, and as you can see from the attached photo, they seem to be cemented onto other fossils as well.

If anyone can tell me what the middle thing is aswell, I'd be very grateful.

Daniel

post-6183-0-95945500-1354744712_thumb.jpg

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The top one does look more like iron stone in this light. The middle one could be a piece of a fish vert..

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Thanks guys (and Coco too of course) for all your input. I'll label it tube worm burrow for now.

Daniel

Edited by drujd

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