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Pagurus

You are certainly well along on your fossil-hunting adventure. I'm sure many of the people on this forum have discovered new sites exactly as you have, but I've personally only used a few of your well-explained techniques. I'm just an old newbie and I appreciate your sharing your methods. Thanks.

Mike

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JohnBrian

A most excellent post! Thanks TomKoss!

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Uncle Siphuncle

50 sites from your own research is an admirable milestone, and you'll value the finds more from those sites than from sites you are shown. it is akin to catching a 50 inch redfish on a mullet that you cast netted yourself.

one more good source of info is unpublished masters theses... i've bought a number of them and found them to be gold mine of detailed and oftimes little known info... the makings of good hunts now and in the future.

speaking of the future, i feel that best new sites in future decades may be on private land, so i can't stress enough honing your ability to track down, win over, reward and respect private landowners.

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Plax

MacFall's Fossils for Amateurs is a gem! Glad you found it. I got my copy in the 80s. Too bad no clubs near you. That is probably the best way to get guided to productive sites and like minded members will usually share information.

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Malcolmt

Very nice post.... wish I had 50 sites that I knew about for collecting. I tend to revisit the same dozen places within a three hour drive of me and feel very fortunate to have found them.

Now if only all this snow would melt and the temperature get above freezing so I can get out again.

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megaholic

Tom, I don't think you are going to be a "Noob" for long! Great post!

I can only add that I have had stellar luck at gaining access on private land just by politely asking the land owners, and then sometimes sharing my finds with them, or just showing them what has been found. Sometimes they look at the items like..."That's what you are looking for"??? And then they just say to come anytime and use the property at your own discretion.

I should probably not admit it to Malcolmt, but I am considering not going fossil hunting this weekend due to the cold. It is forecast to be in the low 70's as a high! We will have to get out the wet-suits again for that kind of "bone chilling" wx.

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jpc

This post is from last summer... And I missed it then. But it is great. Excellent work tom koss. It is very much how I got started, except that I found Fossils or Amateurs much earlier in the process. For those who may wonder why some of us keep our sites secret, notice how much work is involved.

Edited by jpc

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Raggedy Man

one more good source of info is unpublished masters theses... i've bought a number of them and found them to be gold mine of detailed and oftimes little known info... the makings of good hunts now and in the future.

That's a brilliant idea and one I'll have to adopt! Simply amazing...you clever paleophile you.

Best regards,

Paul

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lordcooler

Wow that's alot of work. I suggest you Google harder. The surveys I have found give me a location and GPS longitude ect ect took me 3 mins to find it.

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lordcooler

This post is from last summer... And I missed it then. But it is great. Excellent work tom koss. It is very much how I got started, except that I found Fossils or Amateurs much earlier in the process. For those who may wonder why some of us keep our sites secret, notice how much work is involved.

No is because they get picked clean once they are posted online. I went to a site posted on here in alberta badlands this weekend the rock bed he posted was picked clean. Nothing was left. I had to past it by a few 100 meters and got really lucky to find a dino bone sitting in plan sight.

I will be going back and going a bit farther in next time. Only thing protecting the site is bugs and cougars bush and this lazy generation lol.

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MissMoose

pardon my piping up when i'm still very new to this site; however, i've seen a few people mention the same "problem" of giving up on "old" sites because (it's believed) that they will never yield anything good again....... I felt compelled to share my experience and let you all know that you can be very wrong on this score !! I noticed that some people no longer wanted to go to "old" sites because too many people had been there and the sites are now picked over and exhausted. I used to feel this way about a few places, but now i know better. The fact is that, here in the Northeast, we have had a few "superstorms" that have totally changed the game. Places that were, indeed, played out are like new again. Those storms caused so much reconfiguration of the ground, such massive erosion, that the sites are now like new....... things formerly buried for many centuries are now being revealed. I used to visit one site up here over and over, since i was about 20 years old (I'm 48 now)..... As i grew older, i noticed that everything was, indeed, overworked and yielding almost nothing. Then i started going there AFTER the superstorms...... WOW.....I can't tell you how much phenomenal stuff i've come up with after those storms. You can just see how the unstable bluffs (lots of sand and clay) have crumbled away and been washed downhill. To wind up this thought, don't give up on a place if you've got reason to believe that some recent erosion has taken place !!! Total game changer. In my case, I'm now hauling stuff out in sacks and the things are museum quality. PS I am doing the responsible thing and am having the things reviewed by local archaeologists, and am interested in having them displayed or at least preserved for future generations. Just some thoughts, FWIW

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Fossildude19

pardon my piping up when i'm still very new to this site; however, i've seen a few people mention the same "problem" of giving up on "old" sites because (it's believed) that they will never yield anything good again....... I felt compelled to share my experience and let you all know that you can be very wrong on this score !! I noticed that some people no longer wanted to go to "old" sites because too many people had been there and the sites are now picked over and exhausted. I used to feel this way about a few places, but now i know better. The fact is that, here in the Northeast, we have had a few "superstorms" that have totally changed the game. Places that were, indeed, played out are like new again. Those storms caused so much reconfiguration of the ground, such massive erosion, that the sites are now like new....... things formerly buried for many centuries are now being revealed. I used to visit one site up here over and over, since i was about 20 years old (I'm 48 now)..... As i grew older, i noticed that everything was, indeed, overworked and yielding almost nothing. Then i started going there AFTER the superstorms...... WOW.....I can't tell you how much phenomenal stuff i've come up with after those storms. You can just see how the unstable bluffs (lots of sand and clay) have crumbled away and been washed downhill. To wind up this thought, don't give up on a place if you've got reason to believe that some recent erosion has taken place !!! Total game changer. In my case, I'm now hauling stuff out in sacks and the things are museum quality. PS I am doing the responsible thing and am having the things reviewed by local archaeologists, and am interested in having them displayed or at least preserved for future generations. Just some thoughts, FWIW

Welcome to the Forum Miss Moose - glad to have you aboard. :)

You are absolutely correct, that sometimes it is worth revisiting older sites.

Sometimes, it may just be a while before more is exposed, as you said.

Land changes constantly, and is worth exploring to find what we seek.

Welcome, again. Please post up some of your finds!

We'd love to see them.

Regards,

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JohnBrewer

Great information that I'll look into here in the uk.

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jpc

MissMoose... great tale... as Tim said, we would love to see what cool stuff you are finding. We all lie fossil pix around here.

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