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Velociraptor99

My Megalodon Teeth

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Velociraptor99

Hey guys it's Anthony. Being a fairly new and inexperienced fossil hunter or collector, my collection is very small, and none of it has been found by myself due to me not having a driver's license yet. Yet I have some nice fossils in my eyes.

Here are my two Megalodon teeth I have purchased. The large one is at least 3 inches, and it's condition isn't the best. The root is holey and has poor reservation, the the serrations are dull to the point (ha) where they are non-existent. The tip is dull or slightly chipped, either from erosion, or from feeding. I bought it from the Aurora Fossil Museum in the tiny town of Aurora, North Carolina. The condition isn't perfect, but I think it's the crown jewel of my tiny collection.

post-18599-0-49431700-1434239261_thumb.jpg

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Velociraptor99

Here's the other tooth. It's a tiny one, 1.75 inches. The condition is pretty good. The root is a crack along the top but is not deep. The serrations are great except near the tip on one sign. It's beautiful in color, as I tend to favor black, gray, or darker colored fossil shark teeth, with a lighter colored root, so this tooth caught my eye. I bought it on FossilEra.com, a very long running and trustworthy site.

post-18599-0-30208900-1434240953_thumb.jpg

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TyrannosaurusRex

I love big teeth but that posterior tooth is a gem!

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Auspex

Very nice, Anthony; any big Aurora tooth has its own mystique, regardless of any lack of perfection. :)

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Velociraptor99

Thank you. I had no idea the little one was a posterior tooth! Would that mean the blade would have been pointed upward or downward? I'm not sure if it would have been an upper or lower tooth.

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jcbshark

Those are some great teeth: )

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old bones

Very nice, Anthony. You are off to a great start on a fossil collection with those! Thanks for showing us.

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Triceratops

Great teeth! Thanks for sharing them with us.

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mrieder79

Thanks for sharing. Always love them megs.

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jcbshark

Thank you. I had no idea the little one was a posterior tooth! Would that mean the blade would have been pointed upward or downward? I'm not sure if it would have been an upper or lower tooth.

to me it looks like a little upper : )

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ZiggieCie

I wish you would of brought them to the meeting today, you would of been the hit of the day with your teeth.

It was great to meet you and your Mom, hope the meeting wasn't to boring.

Ziggie

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fossilselachian

Good start. These two megs are nicer than my first two, both of which I have after decades.

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ynot

Nice teeth! Did You collect anything from the spoils pile in Aurora?

Posterior meens from the back of the jaw.

Tony

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Hunt4teeth

Very nice start to your collection. I was in my 30s before I received my first Meg, so your ahead of the game. Not sure if they told you where your first tooth was from when you bought it, but I'm pretty sure that tooth comes from the Meg Ledge off of NC. I have 10 of them in my collection (3 from the Aurora Muesum, including the one on the left in my profile pic) and they all look like your tooth. I only mention this because when I started collecting I did not keep track of the location the teeth were found when I bought them or the seller did not disclose this information, and I have regretted it ever since.

Jay

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Ludwigia

I was almost 50 when I first got into fossils, so as far as I'm concerned, you've got a good head start on a lot of us here. In Germany we say "Klein aber Fein", which means "Small but Fine" and that little meg certainly fits the description.

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Velociraptor99

Thank you everyone! One day I hope to find my own tooth (hopefully it'll be black). Ludwiga, I understood your phrase before I got to the translation, at school I take German classes, I believe my school is one of a few high schools teaching German these days. Always love to expand on my heritage, as I am of deep German descent.

In regards to the question wether I got to go to the Aurora NC spoil piles/phosphate mine, sadly I did not. I was about 13 when I went to NC and still widely regard it as my worst family vacation ever, with a combination of parasites and a grumpy family to boot. On the way back through WV, we got stuck in traffic in the mountains for six hours!

Had I have known about the phosphate mine, I probably wouldn't be allowed to enter anyway. I did how ever, collect some tiny fossil shark teeth from the tiny phosphate "sand box" right outside the museum, as well as tube worm like fossils and an unidentifiable (so far) piece of vertebrate. Will post those soon.

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