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About a month or so ago, I had a few hours to kill and decided on a whim to go search for the Lecthaylus gregarius in Blue Island, Illinois. I walked down to the river and found the Lockport shale which was really fun and easy to split apart, but all I came across were lots of plates of worms like this one:

 

IMAG7781.jpg

 

I wasn't even sure if these were Silurian annelids. In the end, I was unsuccessful in finding Lecthaylus gregarius, however I did find these fossils:

 

IMAG8152_1.jpgIMAG8153_1.jpgIMAG8154_1.jpg 

If anyone has more info on genus types, etc. would be greatly appreciated!

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Roy, S.K., & Croneis, C. (1931)

 A Silurian worm and associated fauna.

Field Museum of Natural History, 4(7):229-247

LINK

 

Weller, S. (1925) 

A new type of Silurian worm.

Journal of Geology, 33(5):540-544

Weller1925.pdf

 

 

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Second picture looks like a calamite to me.

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1 hour ago, piranha said:

Roy, S.K., & Croneis, C. (1931)

 A Silurian worm and associated fauna.

Field Museum of Natural History, 4(7):229-247

LINK

 

Weller, S. (1925) 

A new type of Silurian worm.

Journal of Geology, 33(5):540-544

Weller1925.pdf

 

 

Thanks, Piranha, I appreciate the reading materials.

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24 minutes ago, caldigger said:

Second picture looks like a calamite to me.

Interesting to note, Caldigger. It does indeed have more of a stem/floral quality to it. Thanks, need to research this more..

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you would have to go to Braidwood to find Calamites. :)

Its part of a spyroceras cephalopod.

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I agree with Jim. These periods are hundreds of millions of years apart. For Calmites and Silurian material to be exposed near each other seems highly unlikely. 

 

Just a friendly bit of advice, knowing the age of where you are hunting will help tremendously with IDing your finds, and vise versa. Happy hunting.

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On 11/29/2016 at 9:39 AM, JimB88 said:

you would have to go to Braidwood to find Calamites. :)

Its part of a spyroceras cephalopod.

Thanks! Makes sense

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