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zachary

Interesting Cretaceous Tooth

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zachary

Hello fellow fossil enthusiasts,

I am new to the forum but have been fossil hunting for a couple years. I came across this strange tooth in Ramanessin brook and I am a little confused as to what it may be. I am either thinking a S. serrata or a goblin. It does not have any striations on it. The scale is in inches. I appreciate any help.

 

Thanks,

Zach

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Edited by zachary

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Fossildude19

Scapanorhynchus texanus, I think. 

Wait for some more opinions, but looks similar to some pictured HERE.

Good photos, btw. :) 

Regards, 

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Darktooth

I agree. The lack of striations could simply be from water wear.

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zachary
2 hours ago, Fossildude19 said:

Scapanorhynchus texanus, I think. 

Wait for some more opinions, but looks similar to some pictured HERE.

Good photos, btw. :) 

Regards, 

 

11 minutes ago, Darktooth said:

I agree. The lack of striations could simoly be from water wear.

The thing that is different about it is that it is asymmetrical and its cusplets are ragged. It is also almost as wide as it is long which is not a goblin characteristic. It is also way bigger than a posterior goblin can possibly get. Another difference is that it does not have a U-shaped root.

Edited by zachary

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Fossildude19

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Plax
1 hour ago, zachary said:

 

The thing that is different about it is that it is asymmetrical and its cusplets are ragged. It is also almost as wide as it is long which is not a goblin characteristic. It is also way bigger than a posterior goblin can possibly get. Another difference is that it does not have a U-shaped root.

back teeth are wide in Scapanorhynchus.

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Carl

Yep: I see Scapanorhynchus texanus, too.

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Troodon

I agree with the others.. Added picture from the elasmo.come site to compare against.  The lateral teeth are very different than anterior ones like Plax indicated

 

Screenshot_20170419-115254_20170419115402577.thumb.jpg.6eba9fc4972a3bc892654c7758e95ea7.jpg

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zachary
23 minutes ago, Troodon said:

I agree with the others.. Added picture from the elasmo.come site to compare against.  The lateral teeth are very different than anterior ones like Plax indicated

 

Screenshot_20170419-115254_20170419115402577.thumb.jpg.6eba9fc4972a3bc892654c7758e95ea7.jpg

I found many laterals before but they are much more elongated than this one. This one's width is as great as it's length. And it is way too big for a posterior.

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erose

Pretty sure I have posteriors easily that big.

 

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sixgill pete

That tooth is without a doubt S. texanus. I have countless ones that look just like yours.

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zachary

I guess you are right guys. It might have been just wishful thinking on my part. Thanks for the info.

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