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amon81

what do you think about this deinonychus tooth?

The seller says it's from Utah, U.S.A.

thanks to all

$_3 (12).jpg

$_3 (11).jpg

$_3 (10).jpg

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Troodon

What is the specific locality of where the tooth is from?  Anything more than Utah and what formation it was found.  This is very important.

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amon81

Ok thank you Troodon.

W.

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hxmendoza

Well, it's not Deinonychus. And the owner of the tooth says this of the denticle count:

"10 in the posterior and 8/9 on the anterior"

 

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amon81

Other pictures!

 

$_12 (1).png

$_12.png

$_12 (3).png

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Troodon

Thanks for the additional pictures but without a specific locality it's impossible to say what it is.  Utah has many fauna of different ages and pictures alone are not adequate.   The tooth does not look like Deinonychus to robust to be a dromaeosaurid.  My guess it's from the Cedar Mountain Formation.

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amon81

Ok Troodon,  do you think it's a dromaeosaurid?The seller said he did not know anything else about the tooth, just a general Utah reference, because he bought it 18 years ago.

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Troodon

No it does not look like a typical Dromaeosaurid tooth.   It's most likely from a midsize or larger theropod.  Having said that Utahraptor unlike other Dromaeosaurid's have nearly identical serration density (11-12/5 mm) in both carinae but I've only seen premaxillary teeth.  Without locality it could be a Jurassic tooth.

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-Andy-

While it might be tempting to get this tooth, understand this: there is no provenance data beyond "Utah".

 

If your goal is to get a nice Utah dino tooth, go ahead and buy it. But if you want a positive ID, be prepared that you might never know what dinosaur this tooth belongs to.

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