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Mtskinner

Unknown Teeth from the Tallahatta Formation

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Mtskinner

Here's a few teeth that have me stumped from Southeast Alabama. The area they were found is right in the middle of the Tallahatta formation which should point to them being from the Eocene. We found over twenty of them in the same area with the sizes ranging from 1" to 1/4' inch long. Each tooth is curved and has deep ridges that run the entire length of the tooth, though some are worn more than others. The bases are all round which points me in the direction of a crocodile of some sort but that's where I'm getting stuck...I cant seem to find anything that resembles it online so any help would be greatly appreciated! 

Thanks,

Terence   

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10-15-17 (9).jpg

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Here's a picture of the other items that were associated with them

10-15-17 (6).jpg

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Macrophyseter

Hm. My first guess was just simply fish teeth, but after a few clicks around I found out that some Green River crocodile teeth also have small, long, conical, and pointy teeth as well. Here's an few examples

XVG15c.jpgXVG08c.jpgREP440_02_lrg.JPG

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Troodon

From an old publication... Croc indet.

 

Reptiles from the Eocene Tallahatta Formation of Alabama

J. Alan Holman &Gerard R. Case

Pages 328-333 | Received 11 Sep 1987, Accepted 28 Dec 1987, Published online: 24 Aug 2010

http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02724634.1988.10011716

 

 

Screenshot_20171017-193359.thumb.jpg.a9deb6c78a9f895054f7928e70f7b9b8.jpg

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Anomotodon

I think it is a Gavialoidea crocodilian, most likely Thoracosaurus or its close relative. I am not sure about Thoracosaurus occurrence in Eocene, but it definitely survived till Paleocene. Gavialoidea indet. (?Thoracosaurus) label is highly likely to be correct.

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WhodamanHD

The very latest Paleocene over here in Maryland produces similar croc teeth, I would guess they survived a little longer.

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