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fossilnut

Help in identification

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fossilnut

This  unusual fossil is3 1/4 inches long, 2 3/4 at widest point and tapers to 2 inches. It is 1 1/8,inches thick. The shape is somewhat oval and tapers. This is the 2nd fossil with this coloration that I found in November. Fossils on the beach range from Cretaceous--Exogyra shells and sea urchins to Miocene/Pliocene megalodon and great white shark teeth. The beach has been "renourished" after a recent hurricane. Formerly abundant shark teeth are now very sparse. It does not appear to be bone. The idea of a "tusk" occurred to me but I am unfamiliar with  what a tusk would look like. Any ideas or even better questions would be appreciated. Previously (yesterday) posted a bone found in the same area. Additional pictures will follow.

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The reverse side

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fossilnut

An end view

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The other end

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Fossildude19

Maybe @Boesse can have a look. 

 

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Plax

my guess is weathered piece of manatee rib because of the low porosity. Most of the time these are black or dark brown but this fragment would have been exposed at some time. Keep in mind that this is just a guess.

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fossilnut

Thanks Plax. Please look at my earlier post of a bone with very interesting 'grooves" n one side if you did't see that. I have no clue what it's purpose is or what aminal it came from. Soon I will post some pics of echinoids that I think might be Cretaceous PeeDee formation. These were also found on the beach at NMB

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bottom side

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a sea urchin broken inhalf from same area-NMB

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fossilnut

bottom side

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fossilnut

a third sea urchin top completely eroded but bottom good preservation. Are these all likely from the same genus species. My online look up these seem to be from the PeeDee formation. North Myrtle Beach is within a few miles of North carolina. The beach was recently "renourished". I was told materioal from 3 miles offshore. A few years back I found a smaller urchin but it was a greyish limestone not the beautiful white (calcite?) of these ones. I plan to try and do some prep to remove the covering material.
 

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Al Dente

Your echinoids look like Hardouinia, probably H. mortonis.

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fossilnut

Thanks for your response. I have seen some of the North Carolina's fossil club material. Would love to join them on a field trip someday.

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Boesse

I'm not sure. It's quite dense, so sirenian rib seems to be reasonable. I think the pores are natural bone pores rather than borings.

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fossilnut

Thanks for looking at this. I am going to post picture of 2 other finds from the same area. May not be related but they all are the same light colored and were found within days of each other. Your thought would be appreciated. Files are large so I will multiple post.

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Reverse side

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cupped end my thumb fits perfectly

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"top" grooved area--my fore finger fits into this

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fossilnut

This is the third piece

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other side

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end view

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other end

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