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Sagebrush Steve

Amazing stuff!  Wouldn’t want to come across one of those pterosaurs!

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doushantuo

eudgesllifernakristlanthc.jpg

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doushantuo

 

 

 

I have my doubts about the "archegosaur"...

 

 

park2sajbldwifllist.jpg

 

 

 

 

Betting my bottom dollar director Steve S. knew about this one

 

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jpenn
4 hours ago, Troodon said:

 

Mioplosus labracoides, believed to have been a voracious freshwater predator.  It is related to the modern-day Zander (pike-perch) and comes from the famous Green River Shales of Wyoming. Eocene, 57 million years old.

DV0r3pVXcAAjcJe.jpeg.783fbbf4acbfaab489501cf7eb9f478b.jpeg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

More familiar to North American anglers (especially in the Great Lakes region) Mioplosus' related genus of Sander includes the Walleye (Sander vitreus). Having caught more than a few the resemblance between Mioplosus and the walleye is strong, especially with the spiny first dorsal fin. Included is a Mioplosus of my own.

 

20180302_102521.jpg

 

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jpenn
4 hours ago, Troodon said:

 

Paleoniscoids were a group of extinct fishes with heterocercal tails and diamond-shaped ganoid scales. Pteronisculus cicatrosus (~7.1cm) is a marine fish from the Ambilobe region in northern Madagascar, Lower Triassic 240 million years old

DU6NFZtXcAAzR5r.jpeg.87da271f0c1360e85f1346b90188d055.jpeg

 

 

 

 

 

Oh hey, I have a Madagascan Pteronisculus as well! I love Middle Sakamena Formation nodule fossils, a biota still in recovery from the Permo-Triassic extinction. I'd put a date closer to about 250-247 million on them from what I have read. I'm not entirely sure the quoted fish is Pteronisculus, Triassic Early Fish Fauna of Madagascar has many similar-appearing species and I'm seeing more of a Parasemionotus with that one.

 

Here's mine, with the smaller ganoid scales I'd espect from Pteronisculus.

20180302_103049.jpg

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Bobby Rico

Sorry I am a bit late to the party this week but I like to add to the Sinclair dinos that we’re  at the 1964 world’s Fair . I have a old oil can that illustrates the dinosaurs that maybe swimming around in our gas tanks but never made the contentions to the world’s fair.  Thanks everyone and I love that ammonite with the bit marks  .

 

056EC6C2-6D22-4B4C-81CC-A352FD2BAA74.jpeg

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Tidgy's Dad
On 3/2/2018 at 11:47 AM, Troodon said:

Will start off this week with a  "did you know subject"

 

Did you know 

That we are closer to the time of the T-rex than T-rex was to the time of the Stegosaurus, Allosaurus and Diplodocus 

 

 

 

A specimen of Beothikus mistakensis, an Ediacaran rangeomorph organism, from Spaniard's Bay, Newfoundland. This is what life looked like, on the deep sea floor, 570 million years ago

DWo6Pg-XcAA5UmM.thumb.jpeg.ad1a046a5599def23dc81e1304472ed2.jpeg

 

 

My own specimen of a rangeomorph holdfast Medusina mawsoni from the Rawnsley Quartzite, Ediacara Formation, Flinders Range, South Australia.

It was originally though to be a jellyfish, hence the name. 

Medusina2.thumb.jpg.9f5f30e86cbef067be96d7e53d088728.jpg

Medusina1.thumb.jpg.bedf22d0d0d13bef3562239ba1b5ad5b.jpg

 

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Sagebrush Steve
19 hours ago, Bobby Rico said:

Sorry I am a bit late to the party this week but I like to add to the Sinclair dinos that we’re  at the 1964 world’s Fair . I have a old oil can that illustrates the dinosaurs that maybe swimming around in our gas tanks but never made the contentions to the world’s fair.  Thanks everyone and I love that ammonite with the bit marks  .

 

056EC6C2-6D22-4B4C-81CC-A352FD2BAA74.jpeg

Yes, and because of their advertising campaign for many years I really thought oil came from dinosaurs.  I always wondered how such rare fossil specimens could produce so much oil.

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doushantuo

Some good pics here .The big fish paints a very eloquent picture and is hugely(literally:P) impressive.

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Tidgy's Dad
5 hours ago, Troodon said:

 

Ctenothrissa vexillifer is a deep-bodied reef fish that disappeared after the Upper Cretaceous (99.7 to 94.3 mya), leaving no descendants. Sahel Alma, Lebanon

 

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The Nottingham Ichthyosaur had been hiding in a geology store for decades, and is now on display in the Life Sciences Building.

 

DXS9iNPXkAAFdeP.thumb.jpeg.a90d8098e08a4fd16de5dbdd4efee7bb.jpeg

 

 

 

Very close cousin to dinosaurs the triassic archosaur, Asilisaurus kongwe a composite cast at the Burke Museum

 

DXUaGoSVAAAX3_k.thumb.jpeg.862a99d014df6eef96b07b193e6219df.jpeg

 

Great selection of photos as usual. :)

But i would like to point out that those shown above all seem to have black eyes! 

Who is going about punching prehistoric animals? 

 

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ynot

:yay-smiley-1::yay-smiley-1::faint::thumbsu::1-SlapHands_zpsbb015b76:

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oldtimer

@Troodon You never cease to amaze me on Fridays and you have done it again.

Fantastic  pictures. I don't know where you come up with them but thanks for posting.

I love the picture showing the differences in the Ammonoids.

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Malone

Absolutely amazing! Generations will benefit from all your efforts to preserve these works of art!

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Troodon

Thank you oldtimer for your contributions last weeks Dinosaur Friday

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