MB

Crab's Fever

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Hi Caterpillar, I will check ;)

 

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You can not despise anything, even the most miserable piece of rock, look  friends, last week, browsing in old boxes, found a very small chunk of tufo volcanico from the Eocene of Vicenza region (Italy), that I got from a good friend years ago... with something white looking out... a very small hermit crab chela, but a big surprise, one of the ones that just described a friend of mine in a superb article : Lessinipagurus planus De Angeli & Caporiondo, 2017. Obviously, being a hermit crab, you can't expect to find carapace (they have not) and usually neither legs, only chelae remains, but they are amazing, isn't?5923d0b8a2481_IMG_5269text..thumb.jpg.0c607af9e15064a768513ca71785e415.jpg

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Excellent find. :fistbump:

That is a second Lessinipagurus species in your collection, congratulations. 

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Wooohooo! :crab:

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15 hours ago, Microplax said:

Excellent find. :fistbump:

That is a second Lessinipagurus species in your collection, congratulations. 

Yes, thank you :)

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You can not despise anything, even the most miserable piece of rock, look  friends, last week, browsing in old boxes, found a very small chunk of tufo volcanico from the Eocene of Vicenza region (Italy), that I got from a good friend years ago... with something white looking out... a very small hermit crab chela, but a big surprise, one of the ones that just described a friend of mine in a superb article : Lessinipagurus planus De Angeli & Caporiondo, 2017. Obviously, being a hermit crab, you can't expect to find carapace (they have not) and usually neither legs, only chelae remains, but they are amazing, isn't?

 

Wow!   Wickedly Awesome!!!  

 

  Im going to have to visit here more often.

 

RB

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I have a question fellow crab preppers.

 

Ive noticed a few Tumidos that are 3D prepped (top and some underside) for sale with their  claws positioned nicely away from the front of the carapace and angled away from the front.

 

 

I haven't seen this preservation style yet with Tumidos not saying it couldn't happen but....

 

Has anybody heard of the practice of carefully disarticulating the claws and repositioning in a more asthetic or nice looking position?

 

i guess it could be done but you would have to be careful with the tips of the pincers and making the join look natural would be tricky.

Ive seen other species like this that I have wondered about too.

 

here is an example:

To me the positioning looks unnatural for a Tumido.

 

image.jpeg.052eb0b7e4fe3b1837d927bb0d05b530.jpeg

 

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   Ive prepped out quite a few Tumido's over the years and have never ran into one like that.  I would assume that the claws have been repositioned?

 

RB

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I’ve never prepped a Tumidos, but have done plenty of Pulalius crabs from NW OR & WA and although the smaller ones often seem to have their claws tucked in--they can be found in any position, probably depending on if they were molts or how they were buried.  I’m always looking for ones with the claws outstretched, as its makes a more challenging and fun prep job and the results are interesting.  I don’t think it would be easy to stage or maneuver them, as they would be hard to re-attach ( I use use cyranoacrylate and one needs a clean, snug attachment point).    Here is a group of mine, reaching out—all in the same position when uncovered. 

IMG_1500.jpg

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20 minutes ago, bruce said:

 Here is a group of mine, reaching out—all in the same position when uncovered. 

Looks nice.

Can We see them one at a time, or at least separated a little?

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Here is the one in the very back.  More are in public Facebook photospost-1410-0-09810900-1470945191_thumb.jpgpost-1410-0-46590700-1470945215_thumb.jpg

post-420-0-76002200-1420652744_thumb.jpg

14991009_10154216249744195_1559189816077486179_o.jpg

 

 

 

12549084_10153498502844195_3404245743159889447_n.jpg

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Not usual in Tumidocarcinus, but who knows... the only way to know is examining the merus and carpus and check if they are, like you said, disarticulated and then repositioned as it is done in many commercial Italian crabs, for example most of Harpactocarcinus and Harpactoxanthopsis you see everywhere.

 

:)

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3 hours ago, bruce said:

Thanks, please send me a PM and I will show you where to find them on Facebook.

Why not post them here so all can see?

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Please see above.  I edited and added to original post. - Bruce

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2 hours ago, bruce said:

Please see above.  I edited and added to original post. - Bruce

Those are astounding pieces!

Thanks for showing them here.

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On 26 June 2017 at 11:56 PM, RJB said:

   Ive prepped out quite a few Tumido's over the years and have never ran into one like that.  I would assume that the claws have been repositioned?

 

RB

Thanks RB.

 

I hadn't seen it before either. I've seen it on one other, but it had a huuuuge dominant claw.

 

still some nice prep work if there has been some fiddling.

On 27 June 2017 at 6:10 AM, bruce said:

I’ve never prepped a Tumidos, but have done plenty of Pulalius crabs from NW OR & WA and although the smaller ones often seem to have their claws tucked in--they can be found in any position, probably depending on if they were molts or how they were buried.  I’m always looking for ones with the claws outstretched, as its makes a more challenging and fun prep job and the results are interesting.  I don’t think it would be easy to stage or maneuver them, as they would be hard to re-attach ( I use use cyranoacrylate and one needs a clean, snug attachment point).    Here is a group of mine, reaching out—all in the same position when uncovered. 

IMG_1500.jpg

Thanks for the nice images Bruce.

 

it does seem to be more common for this species of crab and certainly makes for a dramatic and eye catching piece if you have the skill, patience and courage to prep it that way.

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5 hours ago, MB said:

Thanks MB,

 

I wonder if the "claw tucking" is for non moulted crab shell. The tendons or muscles inside contract after death?

Not sure about the anatomy of crab musculature.....

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9 hours ago, Doctor Mud said:

Thanks MB,

 

I wonder if the "claw tucking" is for non moulted crab shell. The tendons or muscles inside contract after death?

Not sure about the anatomy of crab musculature.....

Apparently, and after a rapid burial in m death events regarding these two species, not moults. I don't think in contraction after death but in a defensive posture.  Another thing would be if they were in a dry environment, but they are in the water. Anyway I'm with RB, but this one could be an exception, I don't know.

:)

 

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On 27 June 2017 at 6:51 AM, bruce said:

Here is the one in the very back.  More are in public Facebook photospost-1410-0-09810900-1470945191_thumb.jpgpost-1410-0-46590700-1470945215_thumb.jpg

post-420-0-76002200-1420652744_thumb.jpg

14991009_10154216249744195_1559189816077486179_o.jpg

 

 

 

12549084_10153498502844195_3404245743159889447_n.jpg

Wonderful preps (or Oreos according to autocorrect)

 

Must take a very delicate touch to prep those claws!

On 27 June 2017 at 6:10 AM, bruce said:

I’ve never prepped a Tumidos, but have done plenty of Pulalius crabs from NW OR & WA and although the smaller ones often seem to have their claws tucked in--they can be found in any position, probably depending on if they were molts or how they were buried.  I’m always looking for ones with the claws outstretched, as its makes a more challenging and fun prep job and the results are interesting.  I don’t think it would be easy to stage or maneuver them, as they would be hard to re-attach ( I use use cyranoacrylate and one needs a clean, snug attachment point).    Here is a group of mine, reaching out—all in the same position when uncovered. 

IMG_1500.jpg

A fossil crab aerobics class....

"Now stretch those claws 1...2...3...4"

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Our cat "Mr Ron" tends to kindly demonstrate the usual preservation for Tumidos. 

 

 

image.thumb.jpeg.4d3928f773bcd6603c0d948479835c5e.jpeg

 

Both claws "paws" tucked under.

(A common winter morning preservation for Mr Ron)

 

image.thumb.jpeg.7b2984cdbd85af115ded5f29c174afc0.jpeg

 

Big (usually right claw/paw) extended left claw/paw (smaller) tucked under or at least close to the front. (The heater is on now!)

 

image.thumb.jpeg.3513d88926363cfe2b54b21c6d6d3347.jpeg

 

a very uncommon position for fossil tumidos..... More common for Mr Ron.

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10 hours ago, Doctor Mud said:

 

image.thumb.jpeg.3513d88926363cfe2b54b21c6d6d3347.jpeg

 

a very uncommon position for fossil tumidos..... More common for Mr Ron.

 

 

What a misery ! :hearty-laugh:

 

Coco

 

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3 hours ago, Coco said:

 

 

What a misery ! :hearty-laugh:

 

Coco

 

Yes it's a hard life being a cat sometimes.

I took time off fanning him and feeding him kibble to take the photo....

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