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Kem Kem Sauropod Teeth Identified Correctly?

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LordTrilobite

Good stuff. I'll need to check which catagory my Sauropod tooth falls in.

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Tidgy's Dad

I have seen lots of these teeth and am certain that there are at least two types of sauropod in the Kem Kem, I personally believe there are several. 

We just need to find the bigger bones and skulls. 

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WhodamanHD

Interesting, I think there are an incredible amount of undescribed sauropods in the Kem Kem. Hope we get more work done on these in the near future.

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Troodon

The Jaws of Sauropods are very complex for example, Diplodocus in addition to its functioning row has 4 rows of replacement teeth and Titanoisaurids one fewer.  So some of the variation is expected however most of the teeth I show here appear to be from the functioning row due to the wear facet.  

 

Screenshot_2017-12-24-04-51-16.jpg.73a2babfa0910f70feb92fc710120d4a.jpg

Evolution of High Tooth Replacement Rates in Sauropod Dinosaurs

Michael D. D’Emic, John A. Whitlock, Kathlyn M. Smith, Daniel C. Fisher, Jeffrey A. Wilson Published: July 17, 2013

https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0069235

 

 

If we look at other assemblages we can see what is possible.  

 

The early Cretaceous of the Kirkwood Formation of South Africa is known for its high diversity of Sauropods and is currently represented by four different groups Diplodocoidea, Dicraerosauridae, Brachiosauridae and Eusauropod.  Unfortunately only postcranial material.  The fossil record later in the Cretaceous is pretty slim especially in South America where a lot of comparisons are made since the faunas a closely related..   Unfortunately most discoveries are headless :(

 

From Japan 

Found this interesting paper Titanosauriform Teeth from the Cretaceous of Japan.  Some similarities to what is being sold as Rebbachisaurus :wacko:

  

http://www.scielo.br/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0001-37652011000100014

 

Screenshot_2017-12-24-05-32-06.thumb.jpg.7e1d86295b650a4d250114eb7f28ba1a.jpg

 

 

From Niger my smoking gun that we may have it wrong...or just don't know.

Nigersaurus is a Rebbachisaurid with very different teeth more peg shaped and small.  Scale bar for teeth 5 mm.   Clear evidence that Rebbachisaurids teeth can be peg shaped, small and very different and do not have to look like Diplo teeth..   So without a Rebbachisaurus skull we are clueless what it's teeth look like we may have it right or not.  

 

http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0001230

 

Screenshot_2017-12-24-05-55-51.thumb.jpg.44e16a55bd1bf1e1f419c111d0417db1.jpg

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hxmendoza

Excellent post Troodon. Thank you!

Great photos too. What are you using to take these?

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Troodon
On 12/25/2017 at 8:36 AM, hxmendoza said:

Excellent post Troodon. Thank you!

Great photos too. What are you using to take these?

Thanks.  I use a Canon  Rebel SLR digital with a macro lens, then Adobe photoshop elements

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Sagebrush Steve
On 12/25/2017 at 8:44 AM, Troodon said:

Thanks.  I use a Canon  Rebel 35mm with a macro lens, then Adobe photoshop elements

You mean a 35mm film camera?  Or a digital SLR?

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Troodon
16 minutes ago, Sagebrush Steve said:

You mean a 35mm film camera?  Or a digital SLR?

Oh correct must have been dreaming or senior moment. Who has film nowadays, thanks

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JohnBrewer
18 hours ago, Troodon said:

Who has film nowaday

Ahem....

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Sagebrush Steve
18 hours ago, Troodon said:

Oh correct must have been dreaming or senior moment. Who has film nowadays, thanks

 

53 minutes ago, JohnBrewer said:

Ahem....

Sheet film, no less, or do you still use glass plates?

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JohnBrewer
2 minutes ago, Sagebrush Steve said:

Sheet film, no less, or do you still use glass plates?

Both. I prefer making my glass plates from scratch as they’re sooo much cheaper per shot than film. Large and ultra large format film is silly prices. 

 

34EDB55A-B810-4F2A-A6BD-928F3AD92229.thumb.png.290b9f3951c33450c3a6865546ae29cc.png

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Troodon
1 hour ago, JohnBrewer said:

Ahem....

Okay my bad, I'm talking about us amateurs.  

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JohnBrewer

;)

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zekky

My contribution. Smaller tooth 1/2", very Nigersaurus like. 

 

 

sa1.jpg

sa2.jpg

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zekky

Not sure I'm on the Diplodocidae train. Look at Nemegtosaurus, they look a bit like the Diplodocidae. Are we sure there's a Diplodocidae and not just a few different families of Titanosaurs? 

1-s2.0-S0195667112001553-gr2.jpg

titanosaur_tooth_web.jpg

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Troodon
29 minutes ago, zekky said:

Not sure I'm on the Diplodocidae train. Look at Nemegtosaurus, they look a bit like the Diplodocidae. Are we sure there's a Diplodocidae and not just a few different families of Titanosaurs? 

 

 

Well the paper that describes Rebbachisaurus calls it a Diplo. so that is all we have to go on.   They obviously felt that the holotype material, limited as it was,  was diagnostic enough to describe it as such.  But I agree with you that it might not be and with new discoveries, it could change.  One thing that my limited research as told me and your Nemegtosaurs images continues to confirm is that the shape of the tooth is not diagnostic to determining if its a Diplo or Titanosaurid.  Just think how small, tiny,  the sampling size is of what has been published.  We have a long way to go in understanding what is going on here, again why we are far from identifying teeth from the Kem Kem.

 

Have not seen any teeth similiar to those of Sarmientosaurus not to say they do not exist.   With the age being identical to the Kem Kem's it's very possible that variations are around.   Thanks for you input.

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Troodon

Stumbled across this tooth which contines to support my case that identification of isolated sauropod teeth from the Kem Kem is still a mystery 

A late cretaceous Titanosauria from Madagascar whose teeth look remarkably like the Diplodocoid Rebbachisaurus  

 

Screenshot_20180620-104920.thumb.jpg.33f989c45d8619c3dc67cc11713548f1.jpg

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