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Theropod Teeth Morphology - Kem Kem Basin

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Haravex

An awesome post troodon I have around 25 small teeth that i have either classified as abelsauride or dromaeosaurid I can take close up pictures of all of them if you like including the 3 carchar teeth as one is very small might help with serration count and id for juveniles.

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oldtimer

Nice thread @Troodon to help in ID.

I have a few teeth that this may really help in the correct ID.

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Anomotodon

Great job, @Troodon, for putting it all together!!

I actually thought of another idea for this type of teeth.

5a8225478281e_Morph6.jpg.d635a519195f4106fc4ce116eea844bd.jpg

 

At first I thought that they are from Aegisuchus (but its dentition is unknown, and related Laganosuchus lacks serrations completely and has perfectly symmetrical crowns, although Aegisuchus is larger, so who knows).

*Also relatively thin jaws of Stomatosuchids are unlikely to have teeth with long roots like these ones

Like this

image.png.ed2d4d07f02c63684d9907933085d5aa.png

But what do you think about anterior Hamadasuchus? Looks like there is enough space to house root this size and they are also finely serrated and slightly distally recurved and have very fine labial/lingual ridges. 

Cranial osteology and phylogenetic relationships of Hamadasuchus rebouli(Crocodyliformes: Mesoeucrocodylia) from the Cretaceous of Morocco

 

Details of the cranium of Hamadasuchus rebouli(ROM 52620). Upper details are to same scale; scale bar = 10 cm. Details of the dentition are to same scale; scale bar = 2 cm.

 

Araripesuchus anteriors are different, they have much wider crowns and larger mesial and distal depressions near the base.

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Tidgy's Dad

Another very useful thread in the making. 

Thank you, Troodon. :)

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Troodon
10 hours ago, Anomotodon said:

Great job, @Troodon, for putting it all together!!

I actually thought of another idea for this type of teeth.

 

At first I thought that they are from Aegisuchus (but its dentition is unknown, and related Laganosuchus lacks serrations completely and has perfectly symmetrical crowns, although Aegisuchus is larger, so who knows).

*Also relatively thin jaws of Stomatosuchids are unlikely to have teeth with long roots like these ones

Like this

 

But what do you think about anterior Hamadasuchus? Looks like there is enough space to house root this size and they are also finely serrated and slightly distally recurved and have very fine labial/lingual ridges. 

Thanks, I was thinking it could be a Crocodylomorph but its a very compressed tooth and did not see any matches with those you suggested.

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JohnBrewer

Another great thread, thanks Frank. 

 

Could you explain the physical differences be anterior/posterior (I know @Anomotodon has touched on this) maxillary/mandibular, determining adult/juvenile, distinguishing between different genus and anything else you may think of.  

 

Would be nice to make an educated guess on my teeth and I’m sure others would be interested. 

 

Maybe if a standard way of detailing Kem Kem teeth (such as the way photographs should be taken of the teeth, setation count &c) members could have a Kem Kem teeth gallery. I think this would be hugely beneficial both for the forum and a wider audience. 

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JohnBrewer

Excellent post. Will be printing some of this out. Thanks Frank. 

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Troodon
4 hours ago, Haravex said:

morph type 9b for your use in this highly informative post.

 

Thanks have added but are there Carinae present at the midline of the tooth.  Not apparent in your pictures @Haravex

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Anomotodon

I remembered that I also have almost morph 9b tooth, but I thought it is simply a straight Elosuchus tooth. What do you think? It has some very fine randomly spaced wrinkles that I have seen on other crocodile teeth. Although Haravex tooth definitely looks like a spino.

 

elo.thumb.jpg.7d8af1465d43d66ace189b25bd60afd0.jpg

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Troodon
1 hour ago, Anomotodon said:

I remembered that I also have almost morph 9b tooth, but I thought it is simply a straight Elosuchus tooth. What do you think? It has some very fine randomly spaced wrinkles that I have seen on other crocodile teeth. Although Haravex tooth definitely looks like a spino.

 

 

Are there carinae present midline of the tooth both sides

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Haravex

I want to add that that type 9b only appears in the upper regions of the kem kem beds aka Ifezouane formation and also these teeth i have personally never seen above 2.5 inches or the golden 70mm mark

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-Andy-

Here's another morph type 4 tooth.

 

Moroccan_Raptor.thumb.jpg.40f7471b40676150e4ba3b934e21e591.jpg

 

5a84e423e7268_Raptor1.jpg.3985227fb1d38ba071ff951d5dad5c34.jpg5a84e427456ab_Raptor3.thumb.jpeg.db015d8ecd3cccb4341d875423401a7c.jpeg5a84e429108d2_Raptor4.thumb.jpeg.dd61471ca0bf35165acf56c53b1f8681.jpeg5a84e42ad96cf_Raptor5.thumb.jpeg.3f13eb10cc37180fc48ccad1765276ce.jpeg5a84e4253e56e_Raptor2.thumb.jpg.ee00b26e9d80eadab742f296025c462d.jpg

 

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Anomotodon
3 hours ago, Troodon said:

Are there carinae present midline of the tooth both sides

Yes, carinae are developed and in the middle of the tooth (from both mesial and distal view).

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hxmendoza

Great post as usual Frank. Thanks!

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Troodon
12 hours ago, Anomotodon said:

Yes, carinae are developed and in the middle of the tooth (from both mesial and distal view).

I would then say they are Spinosaurid...

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Troodon

Thanks for the input and comments.

 

Appreciate the examples provided and if there are more its welcomed.

 

Hopefully we can start to put some family names to the one that are missing..would like some help from the scientific community with some new publications.  :D

 

 

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Anomotodon
8 hours ago, Troodon said:

I would then say they are Spinosaurid...

Interesting, then I will have to change this picture in my gallery.

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