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daa906

Starfish, Lincoln Creek formation WA

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daa906

Hey guys! I haven’t posted in a very very long time but I came across this in my journeys and have never found or seen one before. Any ideas? Found in the Lincoln creek formation of Washington state. It is about 1 1/2”

202EB622-DC03-4302-9A02-A37AD2B26B0C.jpeg

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fossisle

Looks like a sea urchin

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FossilDAWG

I agree with fossile, it is an echinoid or the impression of one.  The "arms" of the "starfish" are the ambulacra of the echinoid.

 

Don

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daa906

I can see what you are talking about, this is the positive side of the fossil. The fossil is 3D rather than an impression. There was a concretion on top of this that was weathered and fell apart. I do see how it looks like a sea urchin though.

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daa906

The fossil is sitting inside of the impression rather than an imprint of a fossil if that makes sense. 

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Wrangellian

The whole cavity including what you see as 'arms' is (or was) an echinoid/sea urchin, it was not a concretion that dissolved out. The body (shell) would have been a biscuit-shaped thing with 5 'petals' on its top surface, called ambulacra. Nice specimen even if it is just an impression/negative/mold.

 

 

2-RARE-Oligocene-echinoids-sea-urchins-seeigel-Eupatagus.jpg

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caldigger

Here's a couple more off Google to give you a better idea of the patterning.

 

20180220_231625.png

20180220_231423.png

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Phevo

Linthia sp.

 

Here's a Linthia sp. for comparison ca. 63 myo

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daa906

Ah, that last picture with the ambulacra indented into the urchin definitely shows that it is indeed an urchin. Thank you! I wish the actual body had stayed intact. It completely disintegrated when I picked it up. It did look like a concretion though. I find many concretions where I found this. Very first sea urchin I have ever found there. Mostly Pulalius vulgaris in that area.

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fossisle

You could make a nice positive by filling the depression in with latex or dental compound.

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oldtimer

Nice find for the area you are hunting in.

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Al Dente

Sometimes a reversed image will bring out more details of moldic fossils.

 

 

revers209_negate.jpg

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