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Sam S

Jellyfish fossil?

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Sam S

I discovered this specimen by chance a few years before I got into fossil hunting. I was on a vacation at Oak Island, North Carolina when I found it. I am thinking it is a Jellyfish fossil.

CE3136DF-2463-4C53-95D7-AC4B6F93C54B.jpeg

13968AE4-7393-4DFA-9473-9775DE3AA0B7.jpeg

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supertramp

maybe horn coral?

ciao

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DevonianDigger

Hrm... interested to see how people weigh in on this one. I'm not sure about jellyfish, but I've been wrong about lesser things before!

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Ludwigia

Jellyish fossils are extremely rare and when, then mostly as an imprint, since they are soft bodied creatures. Your fossil looks like the remnant of a horn coral.

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Rockwood

Isn't coastal  NC some distance from Paleocene formations though ? 

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bone2stone
21 minutes ago, Rockwood said:

Isn't coastal  NC some distance from Paleocene formations though ? 

True but there are many ways nature and mankind to transport materials to some unexpected areas.

Glacial or peoples gravel drive ways or even old dilapidated concrete.

BTW: I'm on the horn coral wagon.

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Rockwood
53 minutes ago, bone2stone said:

True but there are many ways nature and mankind to transport materials to some unexpected areas.

Glacial or peoples gravel drive ways or even old dilapidated concrete.

BTW: I'm on the horn coral wagon.

It brings the distinction between rugose and scleractinian corals more into focus though. Doesn't it ?

I'm guessing it's perhaps the features seen in this example that are being used as an indication ?

IMG_4576.JPG

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Rockwood

I still think there are scleractinians that need to be ruled out.

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Fossildude19

Could very well be - corals are not my strong suit. ;) 

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Rockwood
23 hours ago, Fossildude19 said:

Could very well be - corals are not my strong suit. ;) 

I struggle with them myself, but it seems like a situation like this bit me one time for missing the fact that there are very horn like looking solitary scleractinian.

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Ludwigia

Coral it is at any rate.

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Sam S

Now that it has been brought up, this is definitely a coral, but I am not positive that this is a horn coral. What can I clean it with to determine what type of coral it is?

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bone2stone

"Horn" coral vs. the mimics, the cross over grouping of the corals with this "shape".

Finding both here in Texas over the years, and calling them all "Horns or Cones", is so much easier.

Separating them by deposit where found is a less complicated means to keep track as to just what I find.

Just one type is "Horn" and everything else is scleractinian did not seem to make sense.

gallery_9194_2154_433285.jpg

(It seems that mimic corals filling in the niche that horns once occupied is natures way of keeping order in an ever changing environment)

 

None of the above are true "horns" yet all possess the shape without the central column?

(Cone shaped corals)

 

BTW: I still have no ID on the center specimen. (From Eagleford material of Dallas Co. Texas Upper Cret Britton member)

 

Jess B

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Wrangellian

The way I see it is 'horn' is just a descriptive term, like 'cone', and could apply to the Mesozoic scleractinian horns as well. The only reason we think of 'horn corals' as Paleozoic is because most of the horns we see are Paleozoic.

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Rockwood

Then one might as well refer to them as nice corals. Why bother ? 

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Pachy

In my modest opinion "horn coral" is a completely informal term applicable to any coral with the appearance of a horn. In no case exclusive of primary corals.
A couple of examples of non-primary horn corals.

Cretaceous (Santonian) example from NE Spain.

DSCN2129-1.jpg

DSCN2293-1.jpg

 

Eocene (Priabonian) example from NE Spain

DSCN8031.JPG

dscn8033.JPG

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Plax

try googling "Castle Hayne Formation coral". the Rock looks like Castle hayne Formation and some of it may be found on renourished beaches in Brunswick County.

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Rockwood
18 hours ago, Sam S said:

What can I clean it with to determine what type of coral it is?

I think vinegar is good for this. Be sure to thoroughly rinse it afterward. 

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D.N.FossilmanLithuania

Yes it is Rugose horn coral, judging by shape and ornamentation I think it is streptelasmatid from Ordovician. 

Best Regards

Domas

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Rockwood
2 hours ago, D.N.FossilmanLithuania said:

judging by shape and ornamentation

Care to elaborate. 

We love a good lesson in this sort of thing.

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Sam S

Thanks for all of your help! It will probably be a while till I get to cleaning it but I will post a pic when I have done so.

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