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Brian Magnier

Peace River, trip 2

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Brian Magnier

Well, I got to go to the Peace River again! Only for a couple hours this time, but still found plenty of stuff to make me happy :) Tons of tiny shark teeth, turtle shell bits, stingray mouth pieces, and assorted bone chunks. Below are pictures of the highlights, and I would love any help in narrowing down my tentative IDs. Thanks!

 

~Penny for scale in all shots~

 

1- Carnivore tooth (?) No roots attached, but nice cusp.

2- Mammal molar. Could be recent based on color, but feels and looks old.

3- Small mammal tooth fragment. Peg-shaped, but probably not enough there to ID

4- Very thin bone. Was whole when it was found, broke between the river and home, but having it break let me see that it's pretty hollow.

5- Large chunk. Looks a bit like petrified wood, but I'm hoping maybe mammoth tooth piece based on how dense and smooth it is. It looks like it has been wearing down in flakes, and the flakes look like what I think mammoth enamel bits look and feel like.

6- Long bone. Could be recent, but feels quite dense. Mammal limb of some sort.

7- Shark tooth. Interesting curve, would like to know species.

Screen Shot 2018-04-15 at 6.25.13 PM.png

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Brian Magnier

Mammal molar

Screen Shot 2018-04-15 at 6.27.07 PM.png

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Brian Magnier

Small tooth frag

Screen Shot 2018-04-15 at 6.28.23 PM.png

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Brian Magnier

Long thin bone (maybe bird?)

 

Screen Shot 2018-04-15 at 6.30.04 PM.png

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Brian Magnier

Mystery chunk (hoping for mammoth)

Screen Shot 2018-04-15 at 6.32.15 PM.png

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Brian Magnier

Mammal limb. Quite large, about 8" long

Screen Shot 2018-04-15 at 6.34.25 PM.png

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Brian Magnier

Cool curvy shark tooth

Screen Shot 2018-04-15 at 6.34.59 PM.png

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Tidgy's Dad

Nice finds! 

Can't help, but a good day out. :)

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Darktooth

#7 Galeocerdo contortus. Sorry I can't help with the rest. Congrats on a good hunt!

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Brian Magnier

Awesome, thanks! :)

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calhounensis

1-partial tapir molar 

2-Sus Scrofa molar 

3-Sloth tooth

4-bird bone... probably modern.. but I'm unsure what the bone is or the species

5-Proboscidean tusk

6-deer radius 

 

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Brian Magnier

Very cool! I can definitely see 1 as being half of a tapir tooth. I assume the Sus scrofa for #2 would be recent? And I was also thinking of sloth tooth for 3, but it seemed very small (see scale - it's less than an inch long). But I don't have any experience with sloth teeth, so I definitely defer to you! :)

 

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Fossildude19
12 minutes ago, Brian Magnier said:

. I assume the Sus scrofa for #2 would be recent?               

Probably modern on the pig tooth. 

 

And I was also thinking of sloth tooth for 3, but it seemed very small (see scale - it's less than an inch long).

Baby sloth?

 

 

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garyc

#3 looks like giant armadillo to me. Let’s see what others say

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Shellseeker

@Auspex is still (and always) our bird expert.

Tusk has Hunter - Schreger lines.  Please get a photo that shows some of them.

 It may be armadillo or sloth. Sometimes they are hard to differentiate:

As you find Peace River fossils, a little advice..  There are LOTS of threads on Peace River fossils.  I always do a search of TFF as a first step.  It helped me get a lot smarter than I was...   Jack

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Jazfossilator

The bottom tooth looks like an extinct tiger (Galeocerdo)shark to me, however I'm no expert!

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Shellseeker
10 hours ago, Jazfossilator said:

The bottom tooth looks like an extinct tiger (Galeocerdo)shark to me, however I'm no expert!

A counting guy named Why Not once gave me a prize that included these teeth.. Like you I am not an expert, but I am thinking it is Aduncus.  Hopefully, those shark experts will chime in.

ContortusAduncustxt.jpg.014ccbf2c81db501a3870b4119decb8d.jpg

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digit

I was thinking sloth tooth for #3 as well till I saw the size (compared to Ol' Abe). The diameter would be about right for a Holmesina tooth. Both the armarillos and the sloths are in the superorder Xenarthra and so share some common heritage and obviously some tooth similarity. I found a Holmesina molar about a year or so ago and it was my trip-maker that day.

 

Do an internet image search for "Holmesina tooth" and you'll see similar looking teeth.

 

Cheers.

 

-Ken

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calhounensis

After looking again, I do see the closer resemblance to Holmesina. 

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Brian Magnier

Thanks so much to everyone for the help and input! Here is a closer shot of the potential tusk, showing the Schreger lines. Good to know!

 

Screen Shot 2018-04-16 at 11.38.33 AM.png

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digit
On 4/16/2018 at 10:38 AM, Brian Magnier said:

Here is a closer shot of the potential tusk, showing the Schreger lines.

I think you can scratch the "potential" on this. The Schreger lines are quite characteristic of the tusks of one of the hose-nose species. As far as I know the angle of the lines is less than 90 degrees in extinct species of proboscidea (mammoth, mastodon, gomphothere) and greater than 90 degrees in modern day elephants. This is a useful way to determine that a tusk has come from an extinct species and not a modern one under CITES restrictions. I don't believe there is a method that can be used to determine which type of proboscidean a chunk like your specimen came from only that is not from a modern day elephant (which was never in question). I've found lots of small chips of tusk ("ivory") in the Peace River but never a chunk as large as your find. They tend to be brittle and delaminate into tiny curved pieces so be happy that you got a real trip-maker.

 

 

Cheers.

 

-Ken

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Brian Magnier

Awesome!!! Thanks for the confirmation Ken, definitely very excited about the find! :) 

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digit

I'd be as well. :)

 

 

Cheers.

 

-Ken

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HoppeHunting
On 4/15/2018 at 7:51 PM, Darktooth said:

Galeocerdo contortus.

This shark is no longer listed as a species of Tiger but rather in its own genus of Requiem shark, Physogaleus. However, if you wish to refer to it as Galeocerdo, as many still do, feel free. Just thought I'd put that out there :)

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