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Can anyone ID these fossils found on Lake Michigan beach. I'm guessing they're various types of algae

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Welcome to TFF!

The first 2 pictures look like trace fossils.

The last pieces look like non fossil rocks.

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Wendell Ricketts

1 and 3 aren’t fossils, I’m afraid. 2 possibly contains some badly weathered remains of shell or similar material, but it’s hard to be certain from the photo. 

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1 and 3 look metamorphic, but number 2 looks sedimentary and may very well have remains of marine creatures in them, though as @Wendell Ricketts said, they are badly weathered so not enough to go on.

 

Welcome to the forum! Hope to see more finds from you, Kathi. 

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I am curious if #1 looks quite different when wet. Are you able to see more features when wet?

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I also agree on #2,3 & 4, but think that #1 could just as well be weathered limestone or marl with traces.

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abyssunder

I think there might be bryozoans in this pebble.
Can we get better close up images with a scale for this one?

 

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comparative picture from here

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I like your comparison Abyssunder. By Lake Michigan we find lots of Devonian seafloor embedded fossils washed up on shore which were dug up from the glaciers, especially various coral and crinoids. These sparked my curiosity as being more than just rock. Seems everyone agrees that 1 and 3 aren't fossils. To answer Kim, #1 can be seen better when wet. I posted the flip side of it which looks like it has a crinoid fossil, but I wanted to know what the other markings were. Anyway, thanks everyone for your input.

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This is another similar fossil showing both sides if that helps. One side definitely has a crinoid stem, but the other markings intrigue me with the same teardrop like markings and streaks! 

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The last rock shows a horn coral cross section (in first picture). The "teardrop" are an oblique cross section, but I am unsure of what., and what appear to be bryozoan (second picture)

The first picture (that is wet) is a nautiloid cross section.

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I suspected we might see more when wet that might help with ID. I’ve seen quite a number of similar fossils posted from the Great Lakes area. 

You should consider polishing it. I have seen stuff similar to your 4th stone come out absolutely stunning. 

Here is a post on the TFF Facebook group from a similar stone from Michigan after it was polished. The transformation is stunning and the result is exquisite!! The results were shocking to myself and others. It’s a must see. Although I’m not sure which lake it came from.

 

https://www.facebook.com/groups/135008766530423/permalink/1807813712583245/

 

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Oh wow, Kim, thanks for the tip. I checked out the FB link of polished stone from Lake Michigan. So beautiful when polished . . . who knew. I have so many of those types of fossils. I very much recognize the "Petoskey Stone" Hexagonaria, percarinata and the favosite corals as well as the circular crinoid stems. I'm tempted to give it a try!

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2 hours ago, KimTexan said:

I suspected we might see more when wet that might help with ID. I’ve seen quite a number of similar fossils posted from the Great Lakes area. 

You should consider polishing it. I have seen stuff similar to your 4th stone come out absolutely stunning. 

Here is a post on the TFF Facebook group from a similar stone from Michigan after it was polished. The transformation is stunning and the result is exquisite!! The results were shocking to myself and others. It’s a must see. Although I’m not sure which lake it came from.

 

https://www.facebook.com/groups/135008766530423/permalink/1807813712583245/

 

Omg....never imagined it could come to those colours...amazing

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  • 1 year later...
On 04.06.2018 at 8:15 PM, Kathi said:

This is another similar fossil showing both sides if that helps. One side definitely has a crinoid stem, but the other markings intrigue me with the same teardrop like markings and streaks! 

DSC09479.JPG

DSC09482.JPG

And I see also Graptolithina (?)

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