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corporateidentity

If this is a trace fossil, does it have a scientific name?

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corporateidentity

Hello everyone!

 

I found this specimen also in a creek on a walk through a local park north of Pittsburgh.  Thinking it may be a burrow fossil, but if it is, was wondering if there is an actual scientific name for it, so I know how to file it away accordingly under the proper name.  Found the term Cruziana online, and wondering if this would qualify.  Does anyone have any opinions? Or, if it is a burrow, is there any way of narrowing down what might have made it i.e. trilobites/arthropods etc?

 

Details:

 

1) Found in isolation/there were no other similar pieces nearby. 

 

2) Measures about 8-12 inches long. Burrow notches are about the width of a penny.

 

3) Again, found in Carboniferous territory in Western Pennsylvania found in a creek.

 

Thanks everyone!

 

 

additionalrock.JPG

additionalrock2.JPG

additionalrock3.JPG

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Innocentx

Very nice and definitely traces. Maybe palaeophycus. 

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Pumpkinhead

Cruziana is a term generally applied to trace fossils originating from trilobites (or other arthropods). Cruziana ichnofossils result from the movement of a partially buried trilobite through mud and will appear as bilateral trackways with furrows oriented obliquely to the direction of movement, like this image from Sam Gon III's excellent website:

triloichno.jpg

At the end is the resting trace, or Rusophycus. I don't think that what you have would qualify as Cruziana but it's definitely burrows. There isn't a way of definitively determining what specific organism caused those structures, but some common culprits for burrows include worms and shrimp. Great fossil and thanks for sharing. Here's a link with more info on trilobite specific trace fossils: http://www.trilobites.info/trace.htm

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Scylla

Looks like palaeophycus Like this

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Herb

I agree with Scylla and Innocentx

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corporateidentity

Thanks everyone!  I looked it up and I definitely think that's what it is. 

 

I appreciate it because I know I never would have found those links or that term.

 

I'll file this away under Palaeophycus

 

:)

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westcoast

It does indeed look like Palaeophycus however it does appear to branch in a couple of places which would rule that ichngenus out. But that might just be preservation of overlying burrows.

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abyssunder

" ... Palaeophycus is a lined burrow filled with sediments typically identical to those of the surrounding matrix. " (Pemberton & Frey,1982)

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