Jump to content
CharlotteG

Miocene pliocene shells Antwerp Belgium

Recommended Posts

CharlotteG

For possible future sales/trades I’m wondering if there are people interested in miocene - pliocene fossils similar to these on the picture below. For trades I would mainly be interested in shark teeth material or micro matrix. Please reply or send me a Pm. 

BAF38B1A-C3F4-4742-9895-5FD47298DBF0.jpeg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Misha

Those shells look pretty nice, although I don't have anything to offer for them, I have already given away all the material I had other than belemnites which nobody is interested in.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
caldigger

PM sent

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Bobby Rico

Beautiful  :wub:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
KimTexan

Interesting. Some of the shells appear to be the same as are found in the Chesapeake Bay Miocene.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Max-fossils
12 hours ago, KimTexan said:

Interesting. Some of the shells appear to be the same as are found in the Chesapeake Bay Miocene.

There is indeed some similarity. @I_gotta_rock sent me some beautiful Chesapeake/Calvert Cliffs bivalves, and I noticed the similarity between them and Antwerp shells. 

None of the species are the same, but a few of the genera are. For example, the American Glossus marylandica is very similar to the Belgian Glossus humanus and G. lunulatus. And the American Astarte thisphalia matches well with all the Belgian Astartidae shells (of which there are too many to list! :P). Also, the Chesapecten nefrens has some similarity with the Belgian Aequipecten opercularis or Pecten complanatus

And it's by clues like this that we can make conclusions on the ecology/environment back then. Here we can say that in the Miocene, Maryland and Belgium were both very similar sea environments! The most knowledgeable scientists can say even more stuff about the subject, like the climate (including approximate temperature sometimes), depth of the sea and strength of the currents, by comparing to similar present and fossil ecosystems.

All this is thanks to how highly specialized bivalves are (same with gastropods)! It's one of the many reasons as to why I love bivalves, because you can say so much about their environment just by looking at the species that occur and their shapes/morphologies :D 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Max-fossils

@CharlotteG beautiful shells! :dinothumb:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ricardo
On 25/11/2018 at 12:09 AM, CharlotteG said:

Please reply or send me a Pm.

 

Hello CharlotteG,

 

I will be interested in some Bivalvia if you have interest in a few Isurus oxyrhynchus extant teeth.

 

Regards,

 

Ricardo

 

IMG_0315.thumb.JPG.3934bb269494ae77e2ac294be314b5f4.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×