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Brett Breakin' Rocks

Chubutensis or Megalodon ?

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Brett Breakin' Rocks

Hello Everyone,

 

  Something that has always confused me ... teeth like this.  This was a tooth pulled from Savannah River dredge material.  I can't confirm the formations but the dredge worked the river to 47foot depth.  I've read in some spots that the material could possibly be as old as Miocene.  My assumption when I am hunting is Pliocene to Pleistocene. Is this just a juvenile meg tooth with cusps or a chubutensis tooth ?  Should the cusps be more integrated into the blade ? 2 inches on the slant.

 

Anyhoo ... an outlier to the teeth that I normally find which are solidly in the megalodon camp.  At least from a morphological standpoint.

 

@Al Dente  Have you seen chubs pulled out of the river ?

 

01_SavannahGA_Chubutensis_112818.thumb.jpg.f621f2a0a60e1b5c30a5735b65d82acb.jpg

 

Thanks,

Brett

 

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MrR

As a newbie, I sure share that confusion. I just picked up Mark Renz' book, "Megalodon: Hunting the Hunter", and am looking at his color images of chubs and angustidens, and telling them apart is sure tough for me. Making it worse, is the fact that they seem to have been swimming around at overlapping times. I'll be watching your thread with interest. Good luck.

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Al Dente
15 hours ago, Brett Breakin' Rocks said:

 

@Al Dente  Have you seen chubs pulled out of the river ?

I’m not very familiar with what can be found in the Savannah River. I generally identify these teeth based on the age, but if I can’t figure out the age, identification can be difficult because these teeth can be highly variable.

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Brett Breakin' Rocks
1 hour ago, Al Dente said:

I’m not very familiar with what can be found in the Savannah River. I generally identify these teeth based on the age, but if I can’t figure out the age, identification can be difficult because these teeth can be highly variable.

Ok, that was my guess as well ... at least it was a fun find for the area.  Not something I've seen.

 

Thanks,

Brett

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