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dolevfab

I have found this thing in a campanian marine phosphate deposit. It came along with fish and shark teeth. It looks like some kind of tooth, but I have no idea. The brown area is translucent and looks like enamel. Although the grey is thicker and sharp.  Any experts on cretaceous fish would be welcome :)

 

Ps. This is definately not just a rock, I am fairly familiar with this deposit and can judge a rock from a fossil.

Could anybody I'd this please?

 

 

20190104_201555.thumb.jpg.6c6986644dddc8170e9a92ea4a832142.jpg

 

 

20190104_201331.jpg

20190104_201527.jpg

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caldigger

Can you state where this was from?

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sixgill pete

Also can you give us good measurements on this.

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Anomotodon

Not sure what the object on the left is though, could be a piece of another Hadrodus too

 

20190104_201527.jpg

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Carl

Definitely a pycnodont pharyngeal tooth but I wouldn't risk assigning a genus to it.

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dolevfab
2 hours ago, sixgill pete said:

Also can you give us good measurements on this.

4 cm long.

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dolevfab
2 hours ago, Anomotodon said:

It is a Hadrodus bony fish pharyngeal tooth, here is an image of one from Menuha formation (Israel, taken from Wikipedia)

 

ÐаÑÑинки по запÑоÑÑ hadrodus

Thanks!

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sixgill pete

@Anomotodon @Carl @dolevfab 

At 4 cm (1.575 inches) that would be an extremely large pharyngeal tooth.

I think it is a piece of something. 

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sixgill pete

It reminds me of a gill raker. But that would be a huge one.

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sixgill pete

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Al Dente

It looks like Hadrodus/Stephanodus to me.

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sixgill pete
23 minutes ago, Al Dente said:

It looks like Hadrodus/Stephanodus to me.

Even at 4 centimetres?

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sixgill pete

Well, you live and learn. I would never had expected a pharyngeal tooth to be this large.

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MarcoSr
12 hours ago, Al Dente said:

It looks like Hadrodus/Stephanodus to me.

 

12 hours ago, sixgill pete said:

 

Don

 

I was thinking Hadrodus/Stephanodus like Eric.  However, I've never seen a Hadrodus/Stephanodus pharyngeal tooth at 4 cm (those two specimens in that TFF post aren't 4 cm).  So a pycnodont pharyngeal tooth from a large species that we just don't see here in the US.

 

Marco Sr.

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siteseer

Yeah, pycnodont seems to be what that is.  Giants exist.  I once saw a Paraorthacodus tooth that was about one-third larger than any other one I'd seen before.  And what about Northern Shark's giant Carcharoides tooth?

 

The other specimen might be a piece of another one though it seems flatter so that might be a piece of a sawfish rostral spine.

 

Jess

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Max-fossils

First thing I thought of was Eotrigonodon (E. serratus occurs in the Lede Sand Formation, in the Eocene of Belgium). 

The exact shape doesn't fit with E. serratus but I could see it going with maybe another Eotrigonodon or another closely-related fish. 

 

Even though it's giant in size, I'm still sticking with fish pharyngeal tooth.

The Eotrigonodon is not a pycnodont, it's from the Tetraodontiformes. Perhaps that's another place to look at for a genus/species answer for this specimen. 

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Plax
On 1/4/2019 at 1:25 PM, dolevfab said:

I have found this thing in a campanian marine phosphate deposit. It came along with fish and shark teeth. It looks like some kind of tooth, but I have no idea. The brown area is translucent and looks like enamel. Although the grey is thicker and sharp.  Any experts on cretaceous fish would be welcome :)

 

Ps. This is definately not just a rock, I am fairly familiar with this deposit and can judge a rock from a fossil.

Could anybody I'd this please?

Am liking that you've said "definitely not just a rock". We get a lot of "just a rock" IDs here on the forum but hope that no one would say that for such a distinctive fossil.

Agree with Al Dente on the ID.

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