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JBMugu

STH ID Help

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JBMugu

Here is a find that I have been wondering about, it's about 7". First glance it looks like a average rib bone. Thing is I have a lots rib bones but nothing like this. First interesting thing is the weight, it's heavy, at least twice as heavy as the  average STH bone. Second it's not fragile, I dropped it on the tile ( by accident) and it bounced. Third is that it is very dense by the outer edges and is hollow in the middle. Any ideas? Thanks 

IMG_20190112_104655.jpg

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JBMugu

More pics

IMG_20190112_104827.jpg

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JBMugu

Ah I figured out how to crop pics on my phone!

IMG_20190112_104703.jpg

IMG_20190112_104816.jpg

IMG_20190112_104827.jpg

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ynot

I do not see anything diagnostic left on this bone. Agree that it does not look like a rib.

Maybe @Al Dente or @siteseer or @MarcoSr will know.

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siteseer

Hi JB,

 

Sirenian ribs can be very dense and heavy.  That looks like a piece of one.  Sirenian fossils are very rare in the STH Bonebed.  Bob Ernst found a nice tooth, a skull and some rib pieces. 

 

When collecting was allowed in the central Florida phosphate mines, you could find teeth plus the occasional skull or skeleton.  Rib pieces were all over the place.

 

Jess

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MrR

I had heard that desmostylus teeth had been found at STH. I'm not sure if they are considered "Sirenian". Perhaps reading this UCSD study would be of interest, and answer such questions. The study mentions creatures of the California Miocene (Pg.97) . It's now on my reading list for this week (And my forgetting list of the following week.:headscratch:). Cheers.

 

Dugong, Sirenian, Desmostylus, et. al.

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siteseer
16 minutes ago, MrR said:

I had heard that desmostylus teeth had been found at STH. I'm not sure if they are considered "Sirenian". Perhaps reading this UCSD study would be of interest, and answer such questions. The study mentions creatures of the California Miocene (Pg.97) . It's now on my reading list for this week (And my forgetting list of the following week.:headscratch:). Cheers.

 

Dugong, Sirenian, Desmostylus, et. al.

 

No, desmostylians are a separate order of mammals. 

 

Yes, Desmostylus teeth have been found there but they are quite rare.  I collected the bonebed from 1993 to 2007 and found just one partial tooth of a Desmostylus and not one piece of a sirenian (sea cow - I think the STH form is still considered a species of Metaxytherium).

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MarcoSr

The Sirenian ribs that I find in MD/VA are very dense and heavy.  I don't see anything diagnostic in the pictures, so I can't comment any further.

 

Edit:  I should have stated that these ribs are always solid, not hollow like the specimen in the pictures.

 

Marco Sr.

Edited by MarcoSr
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