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sharko69

New Creek, new adventures

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sharko69

Had a doctors appointment a couple of weeks ago and as I was driving home I drove over a bridge that sparked my attention. I saw the access was fairly easy to the first couple and sand bars, and being dressed business casual I needed easy. I always keep my rubber boots in the back of the FJ and made my way down for a quick look. The area is Texas Cretaceous Eagle Ford so I knew the odds were good, but I have hunted other creeks in the area and been skunked. I was there for about 15 minutes and about to head back when I spotted a familiar sight. There was a large Ptychodus  waiting to be picked up. 

 

i headed home and looked at google maps to see if I could find any other access. I found another spot that also looked promising and a couple of days later on the way home from work, I again threw on the boots and hit the couple of accessible piles and was surprised to fine several more Ptychodus teeth and a beautiful large Cretodus. 

 

This is weekend though it was cold and rainy, my son and I hit the area again this time spending a little over an hour or so and found a few more broken teeth as well as a large X-Fish vert and a small mosasaur vert. I am certain this creek is going to turn up some great material after the next rains. I am attaching ictures of the finds from the couple of hours I have had to hunt this spot. 

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The Amateur Paleontologist

Nice finds! Hope you find more material at that site :) 

-Christian

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Nimravis

Great finds- congrats.

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Tidgy's Dad

A very good opportunistic haul! 

Nice.:)

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Darktooth

Awesome finds! The Ptychodus and Cretodus are great finds indeed!

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KimTexan

Cool finds.

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caldigger

What are we looking at on this one?

20190211_101514.png

It almost looks like "soda straws" cave formation feature or agatized coral.

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Heteromorph
6 hours ago, sharko69 said:

BE43320A-1DDF-4040-8CE4-9D3DD728D7D5.jpeg

Wow! Sounds like a fun creek. Are you sure you were in the Eagle Ford and not the Basal Atco? This tooth bears some striking similarity to Ptychodus atcoenses.

 

9EBECA45-5331-43BC-9E8E-04CBEC283C4C.thumb.jpeg.d94f5a18e4d19a585a524dee8a692221.jpeg5ECE167A-1764-43C2-9C35-51CD2CE23DD2.thumb.jpeg.0f3dba60b21cc5f9325dc59be145052c.jpeg

 

From: NEW DATA ON THE OCCURRENCE AND DISTRIBUTION OF PTYCHODUS FROM THE UPPER CRETACEOUS OF TEXAS

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sharko69
4 hours ago, caldigger said:

What are we looking at on this one?

20190211_101514.png

It almost looks like "soda straws" cave formation feature or agatized coral.

Surpula worm tubes on a clam section.

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sharko69
2 hours ago, Heteromorph said:

Wow! Sounds like a fun creek. Are you sure you were in the Eagle Ford and not the Basal Atco? This tooth bears some striking similarity to Ptychodus atcoenses.

 

9EBECA45-5331-43BC-9E8E-04CBEC283C4C.thumb.jpeg.d94f5a18e4d19a585a524dee8a692221.jpeg5ECE167A-1764-43C2-9C35-51CD2CE23DD2.thumb.jpeg.0f3dba60b21cc5f9325dc59be145052c.jpeg

 

From: NEW DATA ON THE OCCURRENCE AND DISTRIBUTION OF PTYCHODUS FROM THE UPPER CRETACEOUS OF TEXAS

 

I also compared with P. atcoensis and thought that was a possibility but had it identified as a big fat P. whipplei by Shawn Hamm. I have several hundred Ptychodus teeth and nothing that even comes close to how robust this tooth is.  Sticks out like a literal sore thumb in my collection even compared to some of my largest specimens.

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sharko69
Just now, sharko69 said:

 

I also compared with P. atcoensis and thought that was a possibility but had it identified as a big fat P. whipplei by Shawn Hamm. I have several hundred Ptychodus teeth and nothing that even comes close to how robust this tooth is.  Sticks out like a literal sore thumb in my collection even compared to some of my largest specimens.

Here is another picture:

 

D5A7620F-CFB1-40E0-B43B-D60450BBB934.jpeg

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Heteromorph
10 minutes ago, sharko69 said:

 

I also compared with P. atcoensis and thought that was a possibility but had it identified as a big fat P. whipplei by Shawn Hamm. I have several hundred Ptychodus teeth and nothing that even comes close to how robust this tooth is.  Sticks out like a literal sore thumb in my collection even compared to some of my largest specimens.

That would be the weirdest P. whipplei I have ever seen! But then again, Shawn Hamm knows 1,000X more than me so I must defer to his judgement. I just wonder what led him to that determination.

 

So you are sure that it from the Eagle Ford? Maybe it is some weird transitional form to P. atcoensis. 

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sharko69
39 minutes ago, Heteromorph said:

That would be the weirdest P. whipplei I have ever seen! But then again, Shawn Hamm knows 1,000X more than me so I must defer to his judgement. I just wonder what led him to that determination.

 

So you are sure that it from the Eagle Ford? Maybe it is some weird transitional form to P. atcoensis. 

 

I agree with you. The marginal lines was the only reason I originally thought P. whipplei. They run in different directions and the cusp is much higher in relation then others I have. That is why I questioned it myself. I was also somewhat surprised at the response but I am going to say he knows 10,000X more than myself. One more picture.

261D414A-6BD4-4FDA-8D2A-C7FD9C435F13.jpeg

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sharko69
45 minutes ago, Heteromorph said:

That would be the weirdest P. whipplei I have ever seen! But then again, Shawn Hamm knows 1,000X more than me so I must defer to his judgement. I just wonder what led him to that determination.

 

So you are sure that it from the Eagle Ford? Maybe it is some weird transitional form to P. atcoensis. 

Two of my P. atcoensis for comparison:

 

FA5CA6F1-1723-4526-A1AD-E2B7BF0337D4.jpeg

4B7725CD-F7AF-4BAC-9096-642D719AFA25.jpeg

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