Jump to content
frankh8147

Squalicorax tooth ID (Monmouth, New Jersey)

Recommended Posts

frankh8147

I found this tiny Squalicorax tooth yesterday at Ramanessin Brook (Monmouth County, NJ Cretaceous). It's interesting to me because it appears to have a mesial heel (notch) that I've seen on other species of the shark but doesn't have a nutrient groove (which I believe disqualifies it from being Pseudocorax) so I'm trying to figure out what it is. 

 

Also, I don't believe Squalicorax bassanii is known from this location but I could be wrong.

 

Thanks!

-Frank

squali!.jpg

squali1.jpg

squali2.jpg

squali3.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Al Dente

The notch might be a deformity.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
frankh8147
10 minutes ago, Al Dente said:

The notch might be a deformity.

I'm thinking that too. The only thing that stopped me from calling it pathological and throwing it into the bin was the fact that the notch is in the same place as Pseudocorox and S. bassani.

 

I'm struggling on where to draw the line between different species and deformities. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Plax

don't think I've seen bassani in the Navesink. Yangaensis though is found in the Woodbury. I agree with Al Dente.

squalWoodbury1.jpg

squalWoodbury2.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Bronzviking

Nice tooth. Could be a freak, checkout my thread.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
xxxhalsteren

 

I just noticed about what time period we where talking and in what time period I was thinking.
So it seems that my european knowledge does not cut it. Any good shark evolution articles/lectures for me to start learning about America ?
It's Always a good thing to increase your knowledge

Centrophorus-sp.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The Jersey Devil

Neat tooth. Pseudocorax would have a nutrient groove, a deeper mesial indentation, and a lot of the time a more angled distal notch. Squalicorax bassanii/yangaensis is only found in the older deposits, has complex serrations, and a deep mesial notch.

 

This tooth isn’t pathological, but is rather a variation of Squalicorax “kaupi”. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Bronzviking
41 minutes ago, The Jersey Devil said:

Neat tooth. Pseudocorax would have a nutrient groove, a deeper mesial indentation, and a lot of the time a more angled distal notch. Squalicorax bassanii/yangaensis is only found in the older deposits, has complex serrations, and a deep mesial notch.

 

This tooth isn’t pathological, but is rather a variation of Squalicorax “kaupi”. 

Hi Joseph, I just visited your website and found it very informative and a nice user-friendly web design. Thanks for sharing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The Jersey Devil
1 hour ago, Bronzviking said:

Hi Joseph, I just visited your website and found it very informative and a nice user-friendly web design. Thanks for sharing.

 

Hi,

thanks a lot! It is a work in progress though; a lot of the descriptions aren’t written yet and some of the information has to be updated and improved/corrected.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
siteseer
9 hours ago, xxxhalsteren said:

 

I just noticed about what time period we where talking and in what time period I was thinking.
So it seems that my european knowledge does not cut it. Any good shark evolution articles/lectures for me to start learning about America ?
It's Always a good thing to increase your knowledge

Centrophorus-sp.jpg

 

Wow, great tooth.  That must be a Centrophorus you were talking about in the Antwerp thread.

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
siteseer
6 hours ago, The Jersey Devil said:

Neat tooth. Pseudocorax would have a nutrient groove, a deeper mesial indentation, and a lot of the time a more angled distal notch. Squalicorax bassanii/yangaensis is only found in the older deposits, has complex serrations, and a deep mesial notch.

 

This tooth isn’t pathological, but is rather a variation of Squalicorax “kaupi”. 

 

I agree.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
frankh8147

Thanks everyone! I will put this tooth somewhere good - out of the thousands of Squalicorax teeth I've found here, I've never seen that variation before.

 

Thanks again!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×