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Zenmaster6

Fossilized Fern from 56 MYA PETM BC Canada

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Zenmaster6

Hello, Someone says Cyathea, I think it looks like Neuropteris Flexuosa. 

Input?

59549769_361992414523445_7530920404131512320_n.jpg

59138297_589681711441983_8683240523122606080_n.jpg

59475811_2163689517071559_5095337647065268224_n.jpg

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Mark Kmiecik

I'm leaning towards Neuropteris. Pinnules populate the rachis more densely than Cyathea. I don't know if we can get down to species, but Flexuosa is a possibility.

 

Just noticed this specimen is "56 mya". I don't think Neuropteris made it that far into the future.

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piranha

Neuropteris is too old and not present in these BC / Washington floras.

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doushantuo

There was(is?/haven't checked yet) a Pecopteris cyathea,which your specimen (I hesitate to say "obviously")can't be,for the simple reason Piranha outlined.

The tree fern genus Cyathea is a not uncommon constituent of Paleocene("early Tertiary") paleofloras,I believe.

IF i may ask,why the "PETM"?

I take it you are familiar with the true meaning of the acronym?

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Rockwood

Tree ferns are restricted to southern latitudes today, but the leaves of ground ferns which look very similar are common in the Maine woods.

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Zenmaster6
13 hours ago, doushantuo said:

There was(is?/haven't checked yet) a Pecopteris cyathea,which your specimen (I hesitate to say "obviously")can't be,for the simple reason Piranha outlined.

The tree fern genus Cyathea is a not uncommon constituent of Paleocene("early Tertiary") paleofloras,I believe.

IF i may ask,why the "PETM"?

I tak/e it you are familiar with the true meaning of the acronym?

PETM is just how I think of these when I see them. 

These strange tropical plants from the thermal maximum. It seems significant to me at least, when identifying them.

Sort of like buchia are usually indicative of the Jurassic - Cretaceous Boundary period. I feel maybe adding PETM might help someone identify this.

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Zenmaster6

So I'm still uncertain. Is Cyathea off the table? 

I would imagine that a Cyathea frond fossil would have more leaflets connected to the fossil, this seems more like a ground fern of some kind but I still am at a lose. 

I'm making this assumption as well, based on this chart 
and this link https://www.researchgate.net/figure/Chuckanut-Formation-leaf-fossils-A-Sassafras-B-Taxodium-swamp-cypress-C_fig2_266138817

 

Stating that this fern which looks identical is a Cyathea.

Chuckanut-Formation-leaf-fossils-A-Sassafras-B-Taxodium-swamp-cypress-C.png

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