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Lone_Wolf

Prehistoric Horse Tooth? Fossilized?

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Lone_Wolf

Found this near Waco, Tx. I think it is fossilized, but I'm no expert. In the same creek we found a whole horse skeleton awhile back coming out of the side of the creek, but this tooth looks fossilized. Makes me wonder if we shouldn't have looked closer at that skeleton.

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Lone_Wolf

Also found a Mosasaur Vertabrae in the same creak that I posted up awhile back as well as a ton of arrow heads.

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Harry Pristis
1 hour ago, Lone_Wolf said:

Found this near Waco, Tx. I think it is fossilized, but I'm no expert. In the same creek we found a whole horse skeleton awhile back coming out of the side of the creek, but this tooth looks fossilized. Makes me wonder if we shouldn't have looked closer at that skeleton.

 

 

 

What do you mean that this tooth "looks fossilized"? 

The horse may have died 20 years ago, or 20,000 years ago, as far as I can determine.  The condition of the tooth might lead me to guess it's more recent than ancient.  But, if I am not seeing something you think indicates great age, please tell us because this question comes up time and again.

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Lone_Wolf

Well it seems more like rock then tooth to me. If you tap it with a rock it sounds like a rock. There’s an old cow skull in my parents yard, and when you tap the teeth they make a “clink” sound. When you tap a rock it sounds much more similar to what tapping this tooth sounds like. What throws me off is the pristine condition, and the enamel look on the surface of the Molar. That’s why I’m here, to ask questions and learn. We just had a big rain and this came out of the side of a black clay creek heavily eroding. Baylor University has been interested in the site for research, but my Granfparents would never let them dig. They believe a glacier created the landscape. Large hill, with lots of interesting features.

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Lone_Wolf

It’s also heavy like a rock.

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jpevahouse

I notice isolated protocone, a sign of late Miocene or Pliocene horses.  An isolated protocone is that small circular enamel ridge which is not connected to the other enamel ridges. Horses are most commonly identified by the pattern of the enamel ridges on top of the tooth. They are very distinct to particular species. During the Late Miocene and Pliocene eras many different species lived at the same time, both small and large.

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JohnJ

If you zoom in closely, the protocone does not appear isolated.

Capture+_2019-05-07-21-36-14-1.png

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abyssunder

I don't know if it helps, but if you can determine the staining minerals, maybe we can say the tooth is permineralized.

Here's an example:

 

The_significance_of_vivianite_in_archaeo.jpg.ca6543617dd1dda82abe453521f5231e.thumb.jpg.b7ac177d2c4f711f376b5d371aaac3a1.jpg

 

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Benjaminpb

:envy:

Message me if you wouldn’t mind a tagalong.

 

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JarrodB

I find quite a few modern and Pleistocene horse teeth at the North Sulphur River Texas. The ones that are like solid rock I can tell are Pleistocene. Any that I can break with my hands I leave in the river. Lol pretty low tech approach but it works. 

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Life Finds A Way

Wagering a complete guess here, but judging by the whiteness of the top enamel it's not fossilized, but is still very old. Possibly from when horses were reintroduced to america in the early 1500's. 

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Jenners

This is my first find of a possible prehistoric horse tooth. Also my first post. Found at Manasota Keys Florida, January 2020. Thank you to this site for helping me identify this find. 

IMG_20200214_152605~3.jpg

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Jenners

IMG_20200214_153610~2.jpg

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Coco

Hi,

 

Yes, OK with horse.

 

Coco

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jcbshark
5 hours ago, Jenners said:

IMG_20200214_153610~2.jpg

If you found that at Manasota Key odds Are it’s fossilized :)

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garyc

Hey @Lone_Wolf welcome to the forum. You will definitely learn a lot here. Like Harry said, that tooth could be 20 years old or 20,000 years old. It is very difficult to tell with isolated Equus teeth. I would think you are in a pretty good area to find Pleistocene  aged material. If you have not already, you should check out the mammoth museum in Waco. It is very impressive

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dinosaur man
On 2019-05-07 at 3:15 PM, Lone_Wolf said:

Also found a Mosasaur Vertabrae in the same creak that I posted up awhile back as well as a ton of arrow heads.

?, if this areas Miocene or Pliocene in age how would there be a mosasaur vertebrae?

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abyssunder
23 hours ago, Jenners said:

This is my first find of a possible prehistoric horse tooth. Also my first post. Found at Manasota Keys Florida, January 2020. Thank you to this site for helping me identify this find. 

IMG_20200214_152605~3.jpg

Considering the oxidation process of vivianite I' ve posted earlyer, you might have an ancient hore tooth. It might  be Pleistocene to Holocene in age. Hard to say for sure.

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