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Kathleen

Fossilized gum and teeth ?

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Kathleen

I need help identifying these teeth and petrified gums. My neighbor received a load of gravel from a quarry in Kansas. I asked if i could look for fossils etc. And I found these teeth. They are 1 1/2 inches long. Thank you

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20190515_084921.jpg

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doushantuo

I reiterate: I'm bad at recognizing stuff from photographs;these look like mammalian teeth(might even be pretty recent??),but i will disappoint you on the "gums" part: given the thermodynamics of organic nonmineralized tissue decay , the chances are these are not gums 

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Misha

Reminds me of a molar from some kind of pig.

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doushantuo

my thinking was along those lines also / they look bunodont

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jpc

out of focus, but I am leaning towards modern pig tooth.  

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SUPER BAT

baby mamot teeth?

Image result for deinotherium skull

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TyBoy

The gums you are indicating are the broken roots of the teeth.

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Misha
2 hours ago, SUPER BAT said:

baby mamot teeth?

Image result for deinotherium skull

The shape does not match to what you would expect in a mammoth, the image you show is deinotherium which is not a mammoth and never existed in Kansas.

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sseth

I believe this is a pig tooth.

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Kathleen

It was found in a quarry. Wonder how old it is.  The top gum looking part is like rock.  

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Mark Kmiecik
2 minutes ago, Kathleen said:

It was found in a quarry. Wonder how old it is.  The top gum looking part is like rock.  

Found in a quarry and quarried from rock are two different things. How old it is depends on how long ago the animal died, not the age of the animal. Tap your teeth lightly with a butter knife and record the sound on your phone or computer. Tap any old rock you found the same way and record. Do they sound the same?

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Harry Pristis

Quarrying operations necessarily move surface deposits to get to deeper material.  A modern pig tooth from the surface could be included in the gravel.

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