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Hugo Tran

Rock found along beach in Florida-fossils?

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Hugo Tran

Found this hunting for shark teeth at a beach this morning. Sadly, no teeth. This however caught my eye. The one little “black coloration” looks like it has a stem and then extends out to a larger part, so maybe fossil seaweed? It might be just a rock. Let me know what you think please. Thanks! 

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85AFC57E-A19A-4E19-988A-4D8F9A7EC522.jpeg

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digit

I've heard of one location in Florida that has fossilized sea grass but most marine algae (seaweed to the rest of us) doesn't tend to fossilize well. I'm more interested in the black outlined areas of this rock. Can't say I've seen similar from Florida but it strikes me that the black bits of this rock may be phosphatically blackened shells that are conglomerated into this limestone like rock. Quite possibly a fossil (though not easily distinguishable). There are a lot of fossilized shells in Florida so this is a much higher probability than seaweed.

 

You didn't say where in Florida you were hunting for shark teeth. Certain beaches have a higher probability of finding fossilized shark teeth (Caspersen Beach in the Venice, FL area) or up in Viera Beach near Jacksonville. Many other beaches are nothing but sand and tourists (and this time of year nesting sea turtles).

 

Welcome to the forum.

 

 

Cheers.

 

-Ken

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Hugo Tran

Thanks for all the info! I found it actually on sunset beach over in tarpon springs. Hopefully it will turn out to be something! 

 

-HT

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digit

Venice is not all that far from Tarpon Springs. The Peace River has had the first big drenching of the rainy season and is up 2 feet since we were last there on Saturday. Assuming further rains follow, the fossil hunting season on the river is likely at a close.

 

 

Cheers.

 

-Ken

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Hugo Tran

Wow. Thanks for the info! I’m heading up to Venice sometime soon to look for teeth. Hopefully I won’t get drenched. So, in your opinion, is what I have a fossil of some kind? 

 

-HT 

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Edited by Hugo Tran

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Bone Daddy

Fossiliferous limestone cobble. You'll find a lot of that material around Florida beaches. From small pieces upwards to big heavy chunks of it. As Ken said, some of it is phosphate-enriched and has a black coloration. Lots of tiny marine fossils are often embedded in it, along with more recent shells.

 

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Hugo Tran

Awesome! So I have some fossils here....great! Appreciate all the help. 

 

-HT

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digit

That means you're in the club! :P Now go out and get some shark teeth and other fossils.

 

 

Cheers.

 

-Ken

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Hugo Tran

Haha I will try. Thanks for all the help! 

 

-CH27

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Plantguy
10 hours ago, digit said:

I've heard of one location in Florida that has fossilized sea grass but most marine algae (seaweed to the rest of us) doesn't tend to fossilize well. I'm more interested in the black outlined areas of this rock. Can't say I've seen similar from Florida but it strikes me that the black bits of this rock may be phosphatically blackened shells that are conglomerated into this limestone like rock. Quite possibly a fossil (though not easily distinguishable). There are a lot of fossilized shells in Florida so this is a much higher probability than seaweed.

 

You didn't say where in Florida you were hunting for shark teeth. Certain beaches have a higher probability of finding fossilized shark teeth (Caspersen Beach in the Venice, FL area) or up in Viera Beach near Jacksonville. Many other beaches are nothing but sand and tourists (and this time of year nesting sea turtles).

 

Welcome to the forum.

 

 

Cheers.

 

-Ken

Hey Ken/Hugo Tran, 

 

I'm wondering if that might be a piece of the Suwannee Formation? Here's a piece of weathered limestone from up near Brooksville from many years ago.  

5d01bb4f44b10_WeatheredSuwanneeformation.thumb.jpg.58cc391fe31f80abdcfa2b53df3074de.jpgand a small echinoid with a similar dark staining that shows the individual plates..most of the echys dont have that staining so this one is fairly rare...the echys in both photos are a little over an inch long...

5d01bbf71db48_VulcanRhyncholampus.thumb.jpg.fc30606e61974bf7beb8bfe248b3872b.jpg

Good luck hunting! 

Regards, Chris 

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digit

A weathered echinoderm test in cross section would seem to match the black outline in the first photo at the start of this topic.

 

 

Cheers.

 

-Ken

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Hugo Tran

Neat! Thanks for all the help. I think I’ll hang on to it. 

 

-HT

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