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Chase_E

Looking for Kansas Cardabiodon

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Chase_E

I am a Cretaceous shark tooth collector, and I’ve been trying really hard to find a good condition complete Cardabiodon venator from the western interior seaway, preferably Kansas. I have a lot of different trading fodder that I could present in order to trade including: 

Russian Cretoxyrhina mantelli and vraconensis,

 

Japanese Miocene and Pleistocene shark teeth, 

 

Russian Cretaceous shark teeth (cretalamna, archaeolamna, ptychodus, squalicorax, polyacrodus, etc.),

 

A couple dwardius woodwardi from Russia, 

 

Elmwood Mine mineral specimens (closed mine),

 

nice condition trilobites (beachers bed and Russia),

 

Many other species. 

 

Let me me know if you guys are interested in trading!

 

Thanks,

Chase

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Nimravis

Hopefully someone can help you out.

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siteseer
On July 2, 2019 at 6:30 PM, Chase_E said:

I am a Cretaceous shark tooth collector, and I’ve been trying really hard to find a good condition complete Cardabiodon venator from the western interior seaway, preferably Kansas. I have a lot of different trading fodder that I could present in order to trade including: 

Russian Cretoxyrhina mantelli and vraconensis,

 

Japanese Miocene and Pleistocene shark teeth, 

 

Russian Cretaceous shark teeth (cretalamna, archaeolamna, ptychodus, squalicorax, polyacrodus, etc.),

 

A couple dwardius woodwardi from Russia, 

 

Elmwood Mine mineral specimens (closed mine),

 

nice condition trilobites (beachers bed and Russia),

 

Many other species. 

 

Let me me know if you guys are interested in trading!

 

Thanks,

Chase

 

Hi Chase,

 

As you probably know by now, part of your problem is that you have some competition for something like that.  You might find a tooth at one of the Tucson shows.  The other part of your problem is that it has been proposed that Cardabiodon had an anti-tropical distribution, a proposal that has found support since, so you're less likely to find it from Texas or Mississippi or Alabama.  You are more likely to find it in the U.S. at sites in areas of Kansas or South Dakota or Montana but then you run into the problem that it's still not a well-known shark on top of it being uncommon.  Various collectors out there might have one or two but they're in a box mixed with their Cretoxyrhina and Cretalamna teeth especially if they're in the mid-size range of those two genera.  Some South Dakota sites that were accessible 20-30 years ago have been designated as BLM or national park land since then so you'd have to find collectors who hunted in the 80's or before.

 

Jess

 

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